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Perquimans County, North Carolina

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Perquimans County (/pɜːrˈkwɪmənz/)[1] is a county located in the U.S. state of North Carolina. As of the 2010 census, the population was 13,453.[2] Its county seat is Hertford.[3] The county was originally created as Berkeley Precinct. It was renamed Perquimans Precinct around 1684 and gained county status in 1739.[4]

Perquimans County
Perquimans County Courthouse
Map of North Carolina highlighting Perquimans County
Location within the U.S. state of North Carolina
Map of the United States highlighting North Carolina
North Carolina's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 36°11′N 76°25′W / 36.18°N 76.41°W / 36.18; -76.41
CountryUnited States
State North Carolina
Founded1739
Named forThe Perquimans Indians, an Algonquian people
SeatHertford
Largest townHertford
Area
 • Total329 sq mi (850 km2)
 • Land247 sq mi (640 km2)
 • Water82 sq mi (210 km2)  25%%
Population
 • Estimate 
(2018)
13,422
 • Density54/sq mi (21/km2)
Time zoneUTC−5 (Eastern)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−4 (EDT)
Congressional district3rd
Websitewww.co.perquimans.nc.us

Perquimans County is part of the Elizabeth City, NC Micropolitan Statistical Area, which is also included in the Virginia Beach-Norfolk, VA-NC Combined Statistical Area.

The Harvey Point Defense Testing Activity facility is located in Perquimans County.

Contents

GeographyEdit

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 329 square miles (850 km2), of which 247 square miles (640 km2) is land and 82 square miles (210 km2) (25%) is water.[5]

Adjacent countiesEdit

Major highwaysEdit

DemographicsEdit

Census Pop.
17905,439
18005,7084.9%
18106,0526.0%
18206,85713.3%
18307,4198.2%
18407,346−1.0%
18507,332−0.2%
18607,238−1.3%
18707,9459.8%
18809,46619.1%
18909,293−1.8%
190010,0918.6%
191011,0549.5%
192011,1370.8%
193010,668−4.2%
19409,773−8.4%
19509,602−1.7%
19609,178−4.4%
19708,351−9.0%
19809,48613.6%
199010,44710.1%
200011,3688.8%
201013,45318.3%
Est. 201813,422[6]−0.2%
U.S. Decennial Census[7]
1790-1960[8] 1900-1990[9]
1990-2000[10] 2010-2013[2]

As of the census[11] of 2000, there were 11,368 people, 4,645 households, and 3,376 families residing in the county. The population density was 46 people per square mile (18/km²). There were 6,043 housing units at an average density of 24 per square mile (9/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 70.82% White, 27.99% Black or African American, 0.18% Native American, 0.21% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 0.13% from other races, and 0.64% from two or more races. 0.60% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. There were 4,645 households of which 28.20% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 56.50% were married couples living together, 12.60% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.30% were non-families. 24.10% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.90% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.42 and the average family size was 2.86.

23.00% of the population were under the age of 18, 6.80% from 18 to 24, 24.40% from 25 to 44, 26.60% from 45 to 64, and 19.30% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 42 years. For every 100 females there were 91.30 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 87.50 males.

The median household income was $29,538 and the median family income was $35,212. Males had a median income of $27,251 compared with $18,728 for females. The per capita income for the county was $15,728. About 13.90% of families and 17.90% of the population were below the poverty line, including 27.20% of those under age 18 and 15.80% of those age 65 or over.

EducationEdit

CommunitiesEdit

 
Map of Perquimans County, North Carolina With Municipal and Township Labels

TownsEdit

Unincorporated communitiesEdit

Notable residentsEdit

PoliticsEdit

Presidential elections results
Presidential elections results[12]
Year Republican Democratic Third parties
2016 62.3% 4,177 34.6% 2,319 3.2% 212
2012 57.5% 3,822 41.5% 2,759 1.1% 71
2008 56.6% 3,678 42.6% 2,772 0.8% 51
2004 59.8% 2,965 39.8% 1,971 0.4% 22
2000 51.8% 2,230 47.2% 2,033 1.0% 43
1996 38.9% 1,561 51.5% 2,069 9.6% 385
1992 36.9% 1,429 46.9% 1,818 16.3% 631
1988 53.3% 1,781 46.2% 1,543 0.5% 16
1984 57.3% 1,939 42.6% 1,441 0.2% 5
1980 42.4% 1,210 54.7% 1,560 3.0% 84
1976 35.2% 909 64.6% 1,666 0.2% 5
1972 62.6% 1,299 34.8% 723 2.6% 54
1968 15.4% 468 33.6% 1,023 51.0% 1,554
1964 39.2% 941 60.8% 1,458
1960 30.4% 637 69.6% 1,460
1956 41.0% 709 59.0% 1,022
1952 34.1% 644 65.9% 1,245
1948 12.7% 135 80.1% 849 7.2% 76
1944 21.7% 266 78.3% 960
1940 16.2% 228 83.8% 1,176
1936 14.2% 161 85.8% 970
1932 14.9% 225 84.9% 1,280 0.1% 2
1928 49.6% 600 50.4% 609
1924 34.6% 295 64.5% 550 0.9% 8
1920 31.9% 487 68.2% 1,042
1916 30.8% 288 69.1% 645 0.1% 1
1912 24.8% 228 70.4% 647 4.8% 44

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Talk Like A Tarheel, from the North Carolina Collection's website at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Retrieved 2013-02-05.
  2. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on June 7, 2011. Retrieved October 29, 2013. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  3. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07.
  4. ^ "North Carolina: Individual County Chronologies". North Carolina Atlas of Historical County Boundaries. The Newberry Library. 2009. Retrieved January 25, 2015.
  5. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Archived from the original on January 12, 2015. Retrieved January 18, 2015. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  6. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved July 24, 2019.
  7. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 18, 2015.
  8. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved January 18, 2015.
  9. ^ Forstall, Richard L., ed. (March 27, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 18, 2015.
  10. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. Retrieved January 18, 2015.
  11. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  12. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved 2018-03-17.

External linksEdit