Pennsylvania Route 507

Pennsylvania Route 507 (PA 507) is a 27.2-mile-long (43.8 km) state highway located in Monroe, Wayne, and Pike Counties in Pennsylvania. The southern terminus is at PA 435 and at an interchange with Interstate 380 (I-380) near Gouldsboro. The northern terminus is at U.S. Route 6 (US 6) in Palmyra Township. PA 507 runs southwest-northeast as a two-lane undivided through forests in the upper reaches of the Pocono Mountains, with the northern section nearly parallel to Lake Wallenpaupack. The route passes through Gouldsboro before it crosses PA 196 in Angels. In Newfoundland, PA 507 and PA 191 run concurrent for about 2 miles (3.2 km) and intersect the north end of PA 447. After splitting from PA 191, the route has an interchange with I-84 and a junction with the northern terminus of PA 390 before ending at US 6. PA 507 was designated between US 611 (now PA 435) west of Gouldsboro and US 6 in Tafton in 1928. The route was fully paved by the 1930s and has remained on the same alignment since.

Pennsylvania Route 507 marker

Pennsylvania Route 507
Route information
Maintained by PennDOT
Length27.244 mi[1] (43.845 km)
Major junctions
South end I-380 / PA 435 near Gouldsboro
  PA 196 in Angels
PA 191 in Newfoundland
PA 447 in Newfoundland
I-84 in Greene Township
PA 390 near Tafton
North end US 6 in Palmyra Township
Location
CountiesMonroe, Wayne, Pike
Highway system
PA 505PA 512

Route descriptionEdit

PA 507 begins at PA 435 and I-380 in Coolbaugh Township, Monroe County, heading northeast on a two-lane undivided road. From the terminus, Coolbaugh Road continues.[2][3] A short distance later, the road enters Lehigh Township in Wayne County and becomes Main Street, running through dense forests with some homes to the north of Gouldsboro State Park. PA 507 curves to the east and heads through wooded areas of homes, entering the community of Gouldsboro, where it crosses a Delaware–Lackawanna Railroad line. The road continues north-northeast through dense forests with some private residential developments. The route heads into Dreher Township and becomes Millcreek Road, coming to an intersection with PA 196 in Angels. PA 507 continues northeast through more forests with some housing developments, curving east and coming to an intersection with PA 191. Here, the route turns north to form a concurrency with PA 191, heading north on Main Street through wooded areas with some fields and homes to the west of Wallenpaupack Creek. The road curves to the north-northeast and intersects the northern terminus of PA 447 in Newfoundland. The two routes pass through rural residential and commercial development before PA 191 splits to the northwest and PA 507 heads northeast as Lake Wallenpaupack Road.[2][4]

 
PA 507 approaching the intersection with PA 196 in Dreher Township

PA 507 crosses the Wallenpaupack Creek into Greene Township, Pike County, running through woodland with some development and turning to the north-northwest. The road heads to the north and comes to an interchange with I-84. Following this interchange, the route runs through forests, turning to the northeast. PA 507 continues into Palmyra Township and heads through forested areas of private residential developments on the southeast shore of Lake Wallenpaupack. The road winds northeast along the lakeshore, passing through Paupack and coming to an intersection with the northern terminus of PA 390 near Tafton. Past this, PA 507 continues north through wooded residential development to the east of the lake, reaching its northern terminus at an intersection with US 6.[2][5]

HistoryEdit

When Pennsylvania first legislated routes in 1911, the present-day corridor of PA 507 was designated as part of Legislative Route 168 between the border of Lackawanna and Wayne counties and Gouldsboro and as Legislative Route 254 between Gouldsboro and Tafton.[6] PA 507 was designated in 1928 to run from US 611 (now PA 435) west of Gouldsboro northeast to US 6 in Tafton. At this time, the route was paved between US 611 and PA 90 (now PA 191) near Newfoundland and for a short stretch to the north of Newfoundland.[7] By 1930, PA 507 was paved between PA 90 north of Newfoundland and PA 790 in Greentown along with a small section near Lake Wallenpaupack.[8] The entire length of the route was paved during the 1930s.[9] In 1969, an interchange with I-81E (now I-380) was built with US 611 near the southern terminus of PA 507, at which point US 611 headed south along the freeway.[10][11] An interchange between I-84 and PA 507 was completed in 1968 and opened to traffic in the 1970s.[10][12][13]

Major intersectionsEdit

CountyLocationmi[1]kmDestinationsNotes
MonroeCoolbaugh Township0.0000.000   PA 435 (Drinker Turnpike) / I-380Southern terminus of PA 435; Exit 13 (I-380)
WayneDreher Township8.08913.018  PA 196 (South Turnpike Road)
10.60317.064  PA 191 south (South Sterling Road) – CrescoSouth end of PA 191 overlap
11.93019.199  PA 447 south
12.31219.814  PA 191 north (East Sterling Road) – HamlinNorth end of PA 191 overlap
PikeGreene Township14.617–
14.639
23.524–
23.559
  I-84 – Scranton, MilfordExit 20 (I-84)
Palmyra Township25.75541.449  PA 390 south
27.24443.845  US 6 (Lake Wallenpaupack Road/Grand Army of the Republic Highway)
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b Bureau of Maintenance and Operations (January 2015). Roadway Management System Straight Line Diagrams (Report) (2015 ed.). Pennsylvania Department of Transportation. Archived from the original on February 17, 2011. Retrieved June 30, 2015.
  2. ^ a b c Google (December 15, 2011). "overview of Pennsylvania Route 507" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved December 15, 2011.
  3. ^ Monroe County, Pennsylvania Highway Map (PDF) (Map). PennDOT. 2011. Archived from the original (PDF) on November 6, 2011. Retrieved March 4, 2011.
  4. ^ Wayne County, Pennsylvania Highway Map (PDF) (Map). PennDOT. 2011. Archived from the original (PDF) on November 6, 2011. Retrieved December 7, 2011.
  5. ^ Pike County, Pennsylvania Highway Map (PDF) (Map). PennDOT. 2011. Retrieved December 15, 2011.
  6. ^ Map of Pennsylvania Showing State Highways (PDF) (Map). Pennsylvania Department of Highways. 1911. Archived from the original (PDF) on July 5, 2011. Retrieved January 1, 2014.
  7. ^ Map of Pennsylvania (Map). Pennsylvania Department of Highways. 1928. Retrieved May 7, 2015.
  8. ^ Tourist Map of Pennsylvania (PDF) (Map). Pennsylvania Department of Highways. 1930. Archived from the original (PDF) on July 5, 2011. Retrieved June 24, 2010.
  9. ^ Official Road Map of Pennsylvania (PDF) (Map). Pennsylvania Department of Highways. 1940. Archived from the original (PDF) on July 5, 2011. Retrieved December 16, 2014.
  10. ^ a b Official Map of Pennsylvania (PDF) (Map). Pennsylvania Department of Highways. 1970. Archived from the original (PDF) on July 5, 2011. Retrieved December 17, 2014.
  11. ^ Federal Highway Administration (2012). "NBI Structure Number: 000000000026847". National Bridge Inventory. Federal Highway Administration.
  12. ^ Pennsylvania Official Transportation Map (PDF) (Map). Pennsylvania Department of Transportation. 1980. Archived from the original (PDF) on October 24, 2011. Retrieved January 29, 2015.
  13. ^ Federal Highway Administration (2012). "NBI Structure Number: 000000000029816". National Bridge Inventory. Federal Highway Administration.

External linksEdit

KML is from Wikidata
  • Kitsko, Jeffrey J. (2020). "PA 507". Pennsylvania Highways. pp. 501–550.