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Patrick Hogan (Cumann na nGaedheal politician)

Patrick J. Hogan (13 May 1891 – 14 July 1936) was an Irish farmer, solicitor and politician. He served as Minister for Labour and Minister for Agriculture during the first independent Irish government between 1922 and 1932.[1]

Patrick Hogan
Patrick Hogan TD.jpg
Minister for Agriculture
In office
3 April 1930 – 9 March 1932
PresidentW. T. Cosgrave
Preceded byNew office
Succeeded byJames Ryan
In office
11 January 1922 – 2 June 1924
Preceded byArt O'Connor
Succeeded byOffice abolished
Minister for Agriculture and Lands
In office
2 June 1924 – 3 April 1930
PresidentW. T. Cosgrave
Preceded byNew office
Succeeded byOffice abolished
Minister for Labour
In office
17 July 1922 – 9 September 1922
PresidentW. T. Cosgrave
Preceded byJoseph McGrath
Succeeded byOffice abolished
Teachta Dála
In office
24 May 1921 – 14 July 1936
ConstituencyGalway
Personal details
Born(1891-05-13)13 May 1891
Bullaun, County Galway, Ireland
Died14 July 1936(1936-07-14) (aged 45)
Aughrim, County Galway, Ireland
NationalityIrish
Political partyFine Gael
Other political
affiliations
Sinn Féin
Pro-Treaty Sinn Féin
Cumann na nGaedheal
Spouse(s)Mona Devitt (m. 1931–1936, his death)
Children4
OccupationFarmer, solicitor

Contents

Early lifeEdit

Hogan was born in Kilrickle near Bullaun, County Galway, the son of Michael Hogan, a farmer, and his wife Bridget (née Glennon). He was educated at St. Joseph's College in Ballinasloe and, after completing a BA in History at University College Dublin, was apprenticed to an Ennis solicitor, J. B. Lynch, a relative of his father, and qualified in 1914.

Political careerEdit

Hogan's interest in politics can be traced back to 1910. He frequently collected newspaper cuttings of speeches made during the two general election campaigns that year. Hogan had virtually no active role in political affairs over the next few years and, unlike his brothers, did not join the Irish Republican Brotherhood or the Irish Volunteers. In spite of this he joined Sinn Féin shortly after the 1916 Easter Rising. Hogan, being mistaken for one of his brothers, was arrested in error in 1921 and interned with other republicans in Ballykinlar.

Despite his lack of a fighting record, Hogan's local connections made him a particularly good election candidate in his home constituency of Galway. He was elected to Dáil Éireann at the 1921 general election.[2] Hogan later supported the Anglo-Irish Treaty and was appointed to the subsequent government as the non-cabinet Minister for Agriculture in 1922. He held the same position in the provisional government, while also briefly serving as Minister for Labour, before retaining the agriculture portfolio in the 1st Executive Council of the Irish Free State. The new Cumann na nGaedheal government believed that a better performance in the agriculture sector would help the economy of the fledgling new state. Hogan adopted policies which aimed at improving the competitiveness of agricultural exports. The new Department of Agriculture set standards for production and presentation in eggs, meat and butter. It also extended the farm advisory service and tried to improve breeding stocks and crops. As Minister, Hogan also believed that land purchase was a desirable development. His Land Act, 1923 ordered the compulsory purchase of all land still held by landlords. This process took nearly fifteen years to complete, however, by 1937 all Irish farmers owned their farms. In 1927 Hogan established the Agricultural Credit Association to make loans available to farmers who wanted to improve their farms.

Hogan was killed in a car accident in Aughrim, County Galway, in July 1936, while still a serving TD.

Personal lifeEdit

Hogan married Mona Devitt, a widow with a young son, in 1931. She bore him four daughters in quick succession, including Brigid Hogan-O'Higgins who succeeded her father as a Fine Gael TD for several Galway constituencies between 1957 and 1977.

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Mr. Patrick Hogan". Oireachtas Members Database. Retrieved 7 August 2011.
  2. ^ "Patrick Hogan". ElectionsIreland.org. Retrieved 7 August 2011.
Oireachtas
New constituency Teachta Dála
for Galway

1921–1936
Succeeded by
Martin Neilan
Political offices
Preceded by
Joseph McGrath
Minister for Labour
1922
Office abolished
Preceded by
Art O'Connor
Minister for Agriculture
1922–1924
Succeeded by
Himself
as Minister for Lands and Agriculture
Preceded by
Himself
as Minister for Agriculture
Minister for Lands and Agriculture
1924–1930
Succeeded by
Himself
as Minister for Agriculture
Preceded by
Himself
as Minister for Lands and Agriculture
Minister for Agriculture
1930–1932
Succeeded by
James Ryan