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Pat Hills

Patrick Darcy Hills AO (31 December 1917 – 22 April 1992) was a New South Wales politician. He served in various high offices across the state most notably the Deputy Premier of New South Wales, Leader of the Opposition and as the Lord Mayor of Sydney.


Pat Hills

Pat Hills.jpg
6th Deputy Premier of New South Wales
In office
30 April 1964 – 13 May 1965
PremierJack Renshaw
Preceded byJack Renshaw
Succeeded byCharles Cutler
22nd Leader of the Opposition of New South Wales
Elections: 1971, 1973
In office
2 December 1968 – 17 November 1973
DeputySyd Einfeld
Preceded byJack Renshaw
Succeeded byNeville Wran
68th Lord Mayor of Sydney
In office
9 December 1952 – 30 November 1956
DeputyFrank Green
Kevin Dwyer
Anthony Doherty
Preceded byErnest Charles O'Dea
Succeeded byHarry Jensen
Alderman of the Sydney City Council
In office
4 December 1948 – 4 December 1953
ConstituencyFlinders Ward
In office
5 December 1953 – 30 November 1956
ConstituencyCity Ward
Personal details
Born
Patrick Darcy Hills

(1917-12-31)31 December 1917
Surry Hills, New South Wales, Australia
Died22 April 1992(1992-04-22) (aged 74)
Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Resting placeNorthern Suburbs Memorial Gardens
Political partyLabor
Spouse(s)Stella Steele Hills

Contents

Early lifeEdit

Hills was born in the Sydney suburb of Surry Hills. He was educated at Marist Brothers High School, Darlinghurst and was apprenticed as an electrical engineer.[1]

He was an alderman on Sydney City Council from 1948 to 1956 and Lord Mayor of Sydney from 1953 to 1956.[2]

Political careerEdit

Hills was elected to the New South Wales Legislative Assembly as the member for Phillip in 1954, representing the Labor Party; he held the seat till its abolition in 1981. Then, until 1988, he served as member for Elizabeth.

He was Minister for Local Government in the cabinet of Premier Robert Heffron (1959-1964), and Deputy Premier under Heffron's successor Jack Renshaw. Following Renshaw's departure from the Labor leadership, Hills was the State Opposition Leader from 1968 to 1973; at the 1971 and 1973 state elections he was narrowly defeated by the Liberal Premier, Sir Robert Askin.

During his long Parliamentary service of 34 years, Hills served terms as Deputy Premier and as Minister in a number of portfolios including Local Government, Highways, Mines, Energy, Industrial Relations, Technology, Roads and Employment. In opposition he served as Deputy Leader for three years and Leader for five years. His many notable initiatives and achievements as a Minister include the Sydney to Newcastle Highway, the construction of the Gladesville Bridge and establishment of the State Planning Authority now known as the NSW Department of Planning. One of his major achievements was the building of the Eraring and Bayswater power stations. he has been accused of sabotaging the 1948 Cumberland County Plan for Sydney, "flogging the green belt out the back door before the ink was dry".[3]

Later life and careerEdit

He served as a member of the Sydney Cricket Ground and Sports Ground Trust from July 1961 to December 1989, and was Chairman of the Trust during its significant expansion period from 1977 to 1989. Until John Robertson's resignation in 2014, Hills was the only New South Wales Labor Leader not to have been premier since World War II.

Hills died in Sydney and was cremated with his ashes interred at Northern Suburbs Memorial Gardens.

HonoursEdit

Hills was made an Officer of the Order of Australia (AO) in the 1988 Australia Day Honours.[4]

The suburb of Hillsdale, New South Wales is named after Hills.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "The Hon. Patrick Darcy Hills (1917 - 1992)". Former Members. Parliament of New South Wales. Retrieved 20 February 2010.
  2. ^ "Patrick Darcy Hills". Sydney's Aldermen. City of Sydney. Retrieved 10 April 2018.
  3. ^ http://www.smh.com.au/comment/a-real-city-needs-more-than-just-tying-up-loose-ends-20141217-128zdi.html
  4. ^ "HILLS, Patrick Darcy - Officer of the Order of Australia". It's an Honour database. Australian Government. 26 January 1988. Retrieved 10 April 2018. For service to the New South Wales Parliament and to local government.
Government offices
Preceded by
William Parker Henson
Chairman of the Sydney County Council
1952 – 1954
Succeeded by
Harry Jensen
Civic offices
Preceded by
Ernest Charles O'Dea
Lord Mayor of Sydney
1952 – 1956
Succeeded by
Harry Jensen
Parliament of New South Wales
Preceded by
Tom Shannon
Member for Phillip
1954 – 1981
District abolished
New district Member for Elizabeth
1981 – 1988
District abolished
Political offices
Preceded by
Jack Renshaw
Minister for Local Government
1959 – 1965
Succeeded by
Pat Morton
Minister for Highways
1959 – 1965
Preceded by
Jack Renshaw
Deputy Premier of New South Wales
1964 – 1965
Succeeded by
Charles Cutler
Preceded by
Jack Renshaw
Leader of the Opposition of New South Wales
1968 – 1973
Succeeded by
Neville Wran
Preceded by
George Freudenstein
Minister for Mines
1976 – 1978
Succeeded by
Ron Mulock
as Minister for Mineral Resources
and Development
Minister for Energy
1976 – 1981
Succeeded by
Paul Landa
Preceded by
Paul Landa
Minister for Industrial Relations
1976 – 1988
Succeeded by
John Fahey
as Minister for Industrial Relations
and Employment
New title Minister for Technology
1978 – 1980
Succeeded by
Ron Mulock
Preceded by
Ron Mulock
Minister for Technology
1981 – 1984
Succeeded by
George Paciullo
Preceded by
George Paciullo
Minister for Roads
1984
Succeeded by
Laurie Brereton
Preceded by
Bob Debus
Minister for Employment
1986 – 1988
Succeeded by
John Fahey
as Minister for Industrial Relations
and Employment
Party political offices
Preceded by
Jack Renshaw
Deputy Leader of the Australian Labor Party (NSW Branch)
1964 – 1968
Succeeded by
Syd Einfeld
Preceded by
Jack Renshaw
Leader of the Australian Labor Party (NSW Branch)
1968 – 1973
Succeeded by
Neville Wran