Pape Diouf

Mababa "Pape" Diouf (18 December 1951 – 31 March 2020) was a Senegalese journalist and football agent, who was the president of French football club Olympique de Marseille between 2005 and 2009. He was the first Black President of a top flight football club in any of Europe's top six leagues [1][2][3][4]

Mababa Pape Diouf
Born(1951-12-18)18 December 1951
Abéché, Chad
Died31 March 2020(2020-03-31) (aged 68)
Dakar, Senegal

Personal lifeEdit

Diouf was born in Abéché, Chad, to Senegalese parents.[5][6] The family returned to their native country shortly after Diouf's birth.[2] Diouf had Chadian, French and Senegalese citizenships.[6] Diouf moved to Marseille at the age of eighteen.[7] He later studied at Sciences Po.[7]

CareerEdit

Diouf started out as a journalist, working for La Marseillaise [fr] newspaper.[7] Diouf centred his work around sport, and particularly the local football club, Olympique de Marseille.[3][4] Eventually he turned his hand to being a sports agent,[4] with clients such as former French international defender Basile Boli, and Cameroonian goalkeeper Joseph-Antoine Bell playing for Marseille. He became closely linked with the Côte d'Azur side.[8] As an agent, his clients included Marcel Desailly, Basile Boli, William Gallas, Samir Nasri, and Didier Drogba[9] during Drogba's time at Marseille from 2003 to 2004.[7]

In 2004, Diouf became Marseille's general manager.[10] In 2005, owner Robert Louis-Dreyfus made Diouf Marseille club president.[10] In doing so, he became the first black president of a top-tier European football club.[9] Whilst Diouf was president, Marseille finished second in Ligue 1 twice, and twice finished as runners up in the Coupe de France.[11] In 2009, Diouf appointed Didier Deschamps as Marseille manager. Under Deschamps, Marseille won the 2009–10 Ligue 1, the first time in 18 years that they had won the league.[5] Diouf left the role later in 2009,[12][9] and was replaced by Jean-Claude Dassier.[13] From September 2007 to June 2009, he also worked for the Ligue de Football Professionnel as an administrator.[12][11][9] In 2009, he attended the FIFA headquarters in Zürich, Switzerland, to talk about racism in football and the standard of football in France.[14]

DeathEdit

Diouf died on 31 March 2020 after succumbing to the global pandemic of COVID-19 in Senegal.[7][12] Diouf had been due to fly to Nice, France for coronavirus treatment, but was deemed too ill to travel.[7] He was the first fatality from coronavirus in the country.[5][7]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Pape Diouf: Former Marseille president dies after contracting coronavirus". BBC News. 1 April 2020. Retrieved 1 April 2020.
  2. ^ a b "Pape Diouf: Celebrating Europe's first black club president". Futaa. 1 April 2020. Retrieved 1 April 2020.
  3. ^ a b (in French) [In] OM Actualités (retrieved : 1 May 2012) [1] Archived 21 December 2013 at the Wayback Machine
  4. ^ a b c (in French) Exclusive interview with Olympique de Marseille Magazine (official site) "Pape Diouf : L’OM ne fait plus dans le folklore" Archived 12 September 2008 at the Wayback Machine (Retrieved : 1 May 2012)
  5. ^ a b c "1st virus death in Senegal is ex-French soccer club boss". Associated Press. 1 April 2020. Retrieved 1 April 2020.
  6. ^ a b "Football world mourns death of Pape Diouf". FIFA. 1 April 2020. Retrieved 1 April 2020.
  7. ^ a b c d e f g "Former Marseille boss Pape Diouf dies at 68 from coronavirus". France24. 1 April 2020. Retrieved 1 April 2020.
  8. ^ Nabiswa, Collins (1 April 2020). "🇫🇷 Pape Diouf: Celebrating Europe's first black club president". futaa.com.
  9. ^ a b c d "Former Marseille president Pape Diouf dies after contracting coronavirus". The Guardian. 31 March 2020. Retrieved 1 April 2020.
  10. ^ a b Panja, Tariq (2 April 2020). "Pape Diouf, Former President of Marseille Soccer Club, Dies at 68". The New York Times. Retrieved 30 April 2020.
  11. ^ a b Morse, Ben (1 April 2020). "Legendary Marseille president Pape Diouf dies after contracting coronavirus". CNN. Retrieved 1 April 2020.
  12. ^ a b c "Pape Diouf: Former Marseille president dies after contracting coronavirus". BBC Sport. Retrieved 1 April 2020.
  13. ^ "Un patron de TF1 à la tête de l'OM". La Provence (in French). 19 June 2009. Retrieved 1 April 2020.
  14. ^ "Pape Diouf: Football brings people together". FIFA. 14 April 2009. Retrieved 1 April 2020.
  • (in French) Sport fr (retrieved : 1 May 2012)