Nicole Letourneau

Nicole Lyn Letourneau (born in Fredericton, New Brunswick) is a Canadian professor and researcher. She is the Alberta Children's Hospital Foundation Chair in Parent-Infant Mental Health and a professor at the University of Calgary. Formerly she held the Norlien Foundation Chair in Parent-Infant Mental Health (2011–2016) and Canada Research Chair in Healthy Child Development (2007–2011). She currently serves as the director of the RESOLVE Alberta and principal investigator for the CHILD (Child Health Intervention and Longitudinal Development) Studies Program at Alberta Children's Hospital Research Institute.[1] She has written over 180 peer-reviewed publications; authored the books, Parenting and Child Development: Issues and Answers, What Kind of Parent Am I: Self-Surveys That Reveal The Impact of Toxic Stress Scientific Parenting: What Science reveals about Parental Impact, and has contributed more than 20 other books on parenting and childcare.[2][3]

Nicole Letourneau
Nicole Letourneau.jpg
Born
NationalityCanadian
Alma materUniversity of New Brunswick
University of Alberta
OccupationProfessor, Researcher
Websitewww.childstudies.ca

During the course of her career as a child psychiatry researcher, she has received many honors for her work. In 2016, she received the Inspiration Award, bestowed by the Ministry of Human Services of Alberta.[4] In 2015, she was named one of four Alberta Change Agents by Apple Magazine of Alberta Health Services.[5] In 2014, she was named to the Canadian Academy of Health Sciences, one of the highest honours bestowed upon health researchers in Canada.[6] She has received research merit awards from two Canadian Colleges of Nursing including Alberta's and New Brunswick's in 2011. She was featured in The Globe and Mail in 2008 when she was named to Canada's Top 40 Under 40 and has been named in Canada & North America's Who's Who.[7][8] In 2007, she was named Canada's premier young investigator by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) in receiving the highest ranking in the entire New Investigator competition.[9] She also received the University of Alberta Alumni Horizon award in 2004, recognizing outstanding early accomplishments of alumni.[10]

Early life and educationEdit

Letourneau was born in Fredericton, New Brunswick. She graduated from the Fredericton High School in 1987 and went on complete her baccalaureate degree in Nursing from the University of New Brunswick in 1991, after which she successfully completed the requirements to be a Registered Nurse. After she became a Registered Nurse, she was employed in the surgery ward at the Dr. Everett Chalmers Regional Hospital as well as the Women and Children's unit at the Oromocto Public Hospital.[11]

In 1992, she moved to Alberta and enrolled in the University of Alberta, where she received a fellowship from the National Health Research and Development Program. She completed her master's degree in 1994[12] and subsequently started her PhD in Nursing from University of Alberta. Alongside her PhD, she served as a registered nurse at various hospitals including the University of Alberta Hospital working in pediatric surgery and intensive care, as well in pediatric homecare of Alberta Health Services.[13]

CareerEdit

After the completion of her PhD in 1998, she left her work as a nurse and became an assistant professor at the University of Alberta, where she had been working as a research assistant and researcher on various projects.[14]

Letourneau received post-doctoral fellowships from Alberta Heritage Foundation for Medical Research (AHFMR) and CIHR for her research on support interventions for high-risk families affected by teenage motherhood, depression and other stressors.[15]

In early 2003, Letourneau created the Child Health Intervention and Longitudinal Development (CHILD) Studies Program at the University of Alberta. In September, she moved back to her hometown of New Brunswick joining the University of New Brunswick as associate professor. Simultaneously, she became a research fellow at the Canadian Research Institute for Social Policy (CRISP) at the University of New Brunswick. During this time she became an adjunct professor at the University of Alberta to focus on her work at CHILD. Her research focus began changing from early childhood development to postpartum depression. In 2004, CIHR gave her a grant to conduct research on supporting families affected by postpartum depression.[16][17]

In July 2007, Letourneau received tenure as a professor at the University of New Brunswick. In 2011, she left CRISP as well as University of New Brunswick and joined the Faculty of Nursing at University of Calgary. Simultaneously, she became a scientist at the Alberta Children's Hospital Research Institute. She received the Norlien/Alberta Children's Hospital Foundation Chair with a grant of $900,000 to conduct research on Parent-Infant mental health issues with the option to renew the grant after it ended in 2016. She has been renewed. This role has allowed her to focus most of her time on research.[18]

After focusing on research in the Faculty of Nursing for a year, Letourneau joined to the Faculty of Medicine attaining appointments in Pediatrics and Psychiatry. In 2012, she was appointed as a director of RESOLVE Alberta (Research and Education to Solutions to Violence and Abuse) at the University of Calgary and in 2015, she served as an interim director at the Owerko Centre for Neurodevelopment and Child Mental Health.[19]

As of 2016, Letourneau serves as the Professor of Nursing and Cumming School of Medicine at the University of Calgary and the director of RESOLVE Alberta. She is also the principal investigator of CHILD and the ACHF Chair in Parent-Infant Mental Health.[20] She is a member of many international societies, including a founding board member of the International Association for the Study of Attachment, member of the Society for Emotional and Attachment Studies, World Association for Infant Mental Health and Post-partum Support International.[21]

She has a history of provincial and national governance, serving on the board of the New Brunswick Foundation for Health Research (2010–13), National Collaborating Centre on the Determinants of Health (2007–2011), CIHR Governing Council (2007–2014), including chair of the Standing Committee on Ethics and member of nominating and governance committee, and institute advisory board of the CIHR Institute of Gender and Health (2005–2007) and finally Assisted Human Reproduction Canada (2008–12). She is also secretary of the board of Discovery House Family Violence Prevention Society (2017-), past president of the Alberta Association for Infant Mental Health (2017-19) and incoming president of the College and Association of Registered Nurses of Alberta (2020-2022)[22][23].

Research and writingEdit

Letourneau's research work has been focused on parenting and child development.[24] Initially her research was completely focus on psychological development in early childhood. However, a major part of her research has been focused on how postpartum depression affects parenting and child development. Her writings also deal with child rearing amidst complex social issues such as family violence and teen motherhood.[25][26] Letourneau is one of the first nurse researchers to study the origins of fetal programming of infant stress reactivity[27] and alterations in brain structure caused due to pre-natal depression.[28] Her latest work focuses on how parent-child relationships affect health outcomes such as allergic disease and interact with genotype in predicting neurological outcomes.[29][30]

Building on her completed PhD, she attained her first grant as Co-Principal Investigator from AHFMR on a program to that was found to successfully promote maternal-child relationships between teenage mothers and their infants.[31][32] Her first national funding was from the CIHR Institute of Neuroscience, Mental Health and Addiction on supports and services for mothers affected by postpartum depression. Her research highlighted women's needs and led to policy recommendations for reforms and improved services across Canada and culminated in a conference that attracted researchers, service providers, and policy makers. Thus began a history of attaining regular, substantial funding for projects with national impact.[33][34]

Most recently, she developed and tested MOMS (Mothers Offering Mentorship and Support) Link along with Dr. Cindy-Lee Dennis of the University of Toronto and in partnership with the Province of New Brunswick. Not only was this published, but it has been licensed for delivery by Sykes Telecare.[35][36]

She is also the principal investigator of the APrON (Alberta Pregnancy Outcomes and Nutrition) study. APrON is a longitudinal cohort of ~2200 mothers, fathers and their children, focused on mothers' and children's mental and physical health and nutrition. APrON was established through $5 million funding from Alberta Innovates (formerly AHFMR). To date, 80+ peer-reviewed publications and hundreds of presentations have been derived from these data.

For APrON, funding has been obtained to follow the sample until children are 12 years old ($1.9 million from ACHF). For a subsample (n=225/2200), called the Fetal Programming Cohort, Letourneau is Co-Principal Investigator and co-founder and has helped attain additional funding for more in-depth data collection on parental caregiving quality (videotaped lab visits at 6, 18 and 48 months of age), infant HPA-axis function (lab visits at 3, 6 and 18 months of age), epigenetics and genetics (blood and buccal collection at 3 months of age) via funding from CIHR, PolicyWise, ACHF, NCE AllerGen, KidsBrainHealth/NCE Neurodevnet and an anonymous donor totaling nearly $1 million.

In 2012, Letourneau began research on developing MOMS Link along with Dr. Cindy-Lee Dennis of the University of Toronto, a program she envisioned would help mothers suffering from postpartum depression.[37] Subsequently, she launched a pilot program in New Brunswick. As part of the program, new mothers were signed up for a weekly one-on-one phone call with a woman who had experienced postpartum depression. In 2016, she began working on bringing the program to national audiences through partnership with Sykes.[38]

She has built on this success, with the VID-KIDS (Video-feedback interaction guidance for mothers with depression and their infants) study[39] funded by CIHR (~$600,000), focused on supporting depressed mothers’ parent-infant relationship quality to promote infant mental health. With post-doctoral fellow Martha Hart, she also developed and tested the ATTACH™ (Attachment and Child Health) program[40], which was selected as a Frontiers of Innovation program by the Harvard Center on the Developing Child for its promise in addressing toxic stress impacts on children’s mental health[41]. It received a CIHR-SPOR grant to scale and spread ATTACH™ across Canada. Letourneau and Hart launched the online training program for health care professionals to receive instruction in ATTACH™ in 2019.

Letourneau has written over 180 peer-reviewed publications; authored the books, What Kind of Parent Am I?: Self-Surveys That Reveal the Impact of Toxic Stress and More, Scientific Parenting: What Science reveals about Parental Impact, and Parenting and Child Development: Issues and Answers, has contributed to more than 20 books on parenting and childcare.[42][43][44][45][46]

Personal lifeEdit

She is married to Dean Mullin and has two sons.

Honors and awardsEdit

  • 2019 – Award for Excellence in Leadership from the Canadian Association of Perinatal and Women’s Health Nursing[47]
  • 2017 – National Recipient of Center for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) Difference Maker Award
  • 2017 – Canadian Association of Schools of Nursing Research Award[48]
  • 2016 – Inspiration Award (Ministry of Human Services, Province of Alberta)[49]
  • 2016 – Peak Scholar Award for Research Innovation
  • 2015 – Award of Excellence in Research (College and Association of Registered Nurses of Alberta)
  • 2011 – Award of Merit: Research (Nurses Association of New Brunswick)
  • 2010 – Visitorship Award (Harrison McCain Foundation)
  • 2008 – Canada's Top 40 Under 40 (Caldwell Partners)
  • 2007 – Canada Research Chair Tier II in Healthy Child Development
  • 2006 – New Investigator Award (Peter Lougheed/CIHR)
  • 2006 – Young Scholars Award (Harrison McCain Foundation)
  • 2006 – Research Award (Canada Research Chairs Infrastructure Fund)
  • 2005 – CRISP Award (National Data Training Centre, University of New Brunswick)
  • 2004 – New Investigator Award (Canadian Institutes of Health Research, Regional Partnerships Program)
  • 2004 – University of Alberta Alumni Horizon Award (University of Alberta)[50]
  • 2003 – New investigator (Canadian Institute for Advanced Research)
  • 2003 – Outstanding New Investigator Award (Canadian Association for Nursing Research)[51]

BibliographyEdit

Selected booksEdit

  • Parenting and Child Development: Issues and Answers (2020)
  • What Kind of Parent Am I?: Self-Surveys That Reveal the Impact of Toxic Stress and More (2018)
  • Canada Needs to Rethink Approach to Early Childhood Development in Why We Need More Canadian Health Policy in the Media (2016)
  • A Parent-first Approach Helps Children in Making Evidence Matter in Canadian Health Policy (2015)
  • Scientific Parenting: What Science Reveals about Parental Influence (2013)
  • Developmental Theories in Canadian Fundamentals of Nursing (5th ed.) (2012)
  • Development Across the Lifespan in Fundamentals of Canadian Nursing: Concepts, Process and Practice (2012)
  • Supporting Resilience Among Homeless Youth in Resilience in action (2008)
  • Postpositivistic Critical Multiplism: A Beginning Dialogue in Philosophical and Theoretical Perspectives for Advanced Nursing Practice (4th ed.) (2006)
  • Effect Size: What, Why, & How it is Determined? in Power in Research: Selected Issues for the Health Care Professional (2002)

Selected papersEdit

  • Development of a telephone-based peer support program for new mothers with postpartum depression (2016)
  • The influence of newborn early literacy intervention programs in three Canadian provinces (2015)
  • A narrative and meta-analytic review of the effectiveness of attachment interventions (2015)
  • Quasi-experimental evaluation of a telephone-based peer support intervention for maternal depression (2015)
  • How do interactions between early caregiving environment and genes influence health behavior? (2014)
  • Socioeconomic status and child development: A meta-analysis. Journal of Emotional and Behavioral Disorders (2013)
  • Mothers and infants exposed to intimate partner violence compensate (2013)
  • Post-partum depression is a family affair: Addressing the impact on mothers, fathers and children (2012)
  • Cortisol patterns of depressed mothers and their infants are related to maternal-infant interactive behaviours (2011)
  • Identifying the support needs of fathers affected by postpartum depression: A pilot study (2011)
  • Canadian mothers' perceived support needs during postpartum depression (2007)
  • Adolescent mothers: Support needs, resources, and support education interventions (2004)
  • Attrition among adolescents involved in a parenting program (2001)

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Brandon University researcher's project helps new mothers form bonds with their babies".
  2. ^ "Publications of Nicole Letourneau on Google Scholar".
  3. ^ "Letourneau's research featured in the Globe and mail Online News "How bias in mental health care hurts women, from the lab to the medicine cabinet"".
  4. ^ Government of Alberta, Alberta Human Services. "2016 Inspiration Award Recipients". www.humanservices.alberta.ca. Retrieved 2019-06-05.
  5. ^ "Nicole Letourneau a "change agent" for health – AllerGen". Retrieved 2019-06-05.
  6. ^ "Four top scholars join prestigious Canadian Academy of Health Sciences". UToday | University of Calgary. 2014-09-18. Retrieved 2019-06-05.
  7. ^ "Canada's Top 40 Under 40 – Honourees 2007". www.canadastop40under40.com. Retrieved 2019-06-05.
  8. ^ "Canadian Who's Who". canadianwhoswho.ca. Retrieved 2019-06-05.
  9. ^ "2006 Canadian Health Research Awards". Retrieved June 5, 2019.
  10. ^ "Search Award Recipients | Alumni and Friends". www.ualberta.ca. Retrieved 2019-06-05.
  11. ^ "Archived – Recognizing Signs of Women Abuse: CIHR Experts Speak Out in Light of National Day of Remembrance". 2016-08-31.
  12. ^ "The effect of improved parent-infant interaction on infant development" (PDF).
  13. ^ "Canadian Institutes of Health Research(Profile of Nicole Letourneau)".
  14. ^ "Dr. Nicole Letourneau, Network Participants / Participants au réseau – Canadian Observatory on the Justice System's Response to Intimate Partner Violence – L'Observatoire Canadien sur les mesures judiciaires prises pour contrer la violence conjugale".
  15. ^ "Summary of Research Program".
  16. ^ "Post-partum depression support program looks for Calgary support".
  17. ^ "Linking Moms to Combat Post-Partum Depression" (PDF).
  18. ^ "Owerko Centre at the Alberta Children's Hospital Research Institute".
  19. ^ "Nursing Chair is lead investigator at the new Owerko Centre".
  20. ^ "Faculty Positions in Child and Youth Mental Health Mathison Centre for Mental Health Research & Education: Background information" (PDF).
  21. ^ "Letourneau's research featured in Breakfast TV blog by Leah Sarich "Phone Support for New Moms" March 3".
  22. ^ "Discovery House Leadership". Discovery House. Retrieved June 21, 2020.
  23. ^ "Provincial Council Member Profile - Nicole Letourneau". Retrieved June 21, 2020.
  24. ^ "Building Better Baby Brains from Whats up Yukon". 2013-11-21.
  25. ^ "Letourneau interviewed by Aaron Chatha of Metro News, July 14 on MOMS Link".
  26. ^ "Letourneau interviewed by Amber Schinkel of Global News, June 17 on How to Recognize Symptoms of Postpartum Depression".
  27. ^ Giesbrecht, Gerald F.; Letourneau, Nicole; Campbell, Tavis S.; Alberta Pregnancy Outcomes Nutrition Study Team (2017). "Sexually dimorphic and interactive effects of prenatal maternal cortisol and psychological distress on infant cortisol reactivity". Development and Psychopathology. 29 (3): 805–818. doi:10.1017/S0954579416000493. hdl:1880/51759. PMID 27426858.
  28. ^ "Depression during pregnancy is associated with abnormal brain structure in children".
  29. ^ "Letourneau's research featured in CBC news online article "Mom-to-mom mentorship more effective than clinical therapy or medication, findings suggest", May 9".
  30. ^ Letourneau, N.; Giesbrecht, G. F.; Bernier, F. P.; Joschko, J. (2014). "How Do Interactions Between Early Caregiving Environment and Genes Influence Health and Behavior?". Biological Research for Nursing. 16 (1): 83–94. doi:10.1177/1099800412463602. hdl:1880/51047. PMID 23099559.
  31. ^ Letourneau, N. (2001). Attrition among adolescents involved in a parenting program. Child: Care, Health & Development, 27, 183-186.
  32. ^ Letourneau, N (2001). "Improving adolescent parent-infant interactions: A pilot study". Journal of Pediatric Nursing. 16 (1): 53–62. doi:10.1053/jpdn.2001.20554. PMID 11247525.
  33. ^ Letourneau, N.; Duffett-Leger; Stewart, M.; Hegadoren, K.; Dennis, C.-L.; Rinaldi, J.; Stoppard, J. (2007). "Canadian mothers' perceived support needs during postpartum depression". Journal of Obstetric, Gynecologic, and Neonatal Nursing. 36 (5): 441–449.
  34. ^ Letourneau, N., Dennis, C., Benzies, K., Duffett-Leger, L., Stewart, M., Tryphonopoulos*, P., ... & Watson, W. (2012). Post-partum depression is a family affair: Addressing the impact on mothers, fathers and children. Issues in Mental Health Nursing, 33, 445-457.
  35. ^ Letourneau, N.; Secco, L.; Colpitts, J. Aldous; Stewart, M.; Dennis, C. (2015). "Quasi-experimental evaluation of a telephone-based peer support intervention for maternal depression". Journal of Advanced Nursing. 71 (7): 1587–99. doi:10.1111/jan.12622.
  36. ^ Letourneau, N., Duffett-Leger, L., Stewart, M., Dennis, C. L., Secco, L., Colpitts, J. (2016). Development of a telephone-based peer support program for new mothers with postpartum depression. Current Women's Health Reviews, 12(1), 48-57.
  37. ^ "Post-partum depression support program looks for Calgary support".
  38. ^ "Linking Moms to Combat Post-Partum Depression" (PDF).
  39. ^ "Video-Feedback Interaction Guidance for Improving Interactions Between Depressed Mothers and their Infants". Child Studies. Retrieved June 24, 2020.
  40. ^ "ATTACH™ Program". ATTACH™ Program. Retrieved June 24, 2020.
  41. ^ "Current Frontiers of Innovation Projects". Center on the Developing Child. Retrieved June 24, 2020.
  42. ^ Letourneau, Nicole (2018-06-23). What Kind of Parent Am I?: Self-Surveys That Reveal the Impact of Toxic Stress and More. Dundurn. ISBN 9781459739017.
  43. ^ Letourneau, Nicole (2013). Scientific Parenting: What Science Reveals About Parental Influence. Dundurn. ISBN 1459710088.
  44. ^ "Publications of Nicole Letourneau on Google Scholar".
  45. ^ "Letourneau's research featured in the Globe and mail Online News "How bias in mental health care hurts women, from the lab to the medicine cabinet"".
  46. ^ Letourneau, Nicole (2020). Parenting and Child Development: Issues and Answers. Waterside Press. ISBN 9781909976788.
  47. ^ "2019 CAPWHN Awards". Canadian Association of Perinatal and Women's Health Nursing. Retrieved June 21, 2020.
  48. ^ "2017 CASN Award Winners". Canadian Association of Schools of Nursing. Retrieved June 21, 2020.
  49. ^ "Inspiration Award Recipients".
  50. ^ "University of Alberta Alumni Horizon Award Recipients".
  51. ^ "University of New Brunswick Profile on Nicole Letourneau".

External linksEdit