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Natalie Angier /ænˈdʒɪər/[1] (born February 16, 1958[2] in the Bronx[3], New York City) is an American nonfiction writer and a science journalist for The New York Times.[2] Her awards include the Pulitzer Prize for Beat Reporting in 1991[2] and the AAAS Westinghouse Science Journalism Award in 1992.[4] She is also noted for her public identification as an atheist and received the Freedom from Religion Foundation’s Emperor Has No Clothes Award in 2003.[5]

Natalie Angier
Born (1958-02-16) February 16, 1958 (age 61)
New York City, New York
NationalityUnited States
OccupationScience writer
EmployerThe New York Times
Known forScience articles and books
Notable work
Woman: An Intimate Geography, 1999;
The Canon: A Whirligig Tour of the Beautiful Basics of Science, 2007
Spouse(s)Rick Weiss
ChildrenKatherine Weiss Angier
Parents
  • Keith Angier (father)
  • Adele Angier, née Rosenthal (mother)
AwardsPulitzer Prize for Beat Reporting, 1991

Contents

Early lifeEdit

Angier was born in the Bronx,[3] New York City, on February 16, 1958, to Keith Angier and Adele Angier, née Rosenthal.[6] She was raised in the Bronx and New Buffalo, Michigan.[7]

EducationEdit

Angier began her college studies at age 16 at the University of Michigan.[3] After completing two years at the University of Michigan, she studied English, physics, and astronomy at Barnard College, where she graduated magna cum laude[6] in 1978.[2] She also studied medieval literature, post graduation.[3]

CareerEdit

Angier began her writing career as a technical writer for Texas Instruments.[3] She was then hired as a founding staff member of Discover Magazine in 1980 and largely wrote about evolutionary biology and animal behavior during her four years there.[3][8] After Discover, she worked as a senior science writer for Time Magazine; as an editor at the women’s magazine, Savvy (now defunct); and as a professor at the New York University’s Graduate Program in Science and Environmental Reporting.[7]

In 1990, Angier joined The New York Times as a science writer and remains on staff.[7] She won the Pulitzer Prize for Beat Reporting in 1991[7] and the AAAS Westinghouse Science Journalism Award in 1992.[4], among many other awards detailed in the Awards and honors section below.

Her writing has appeared in print and on-line magazines: The American Scholar, The Atlantic, GEO, National Geographic, O magazine, Parade, Slate, Smithsonian, Washington Monthly, among others.[7] Angier’s books and anthology contributions are detailed in the Books section below.

Angier is a voting member of the usage panel of The American Heritage Dictionary.[7][9]

Philosophical viewsEdit

Angier first publicly described herself as an atheist in 2001:[5]

So, I’ll out myself. I’m an Atheist. I don’t believe in God, Gods, Godlets or any sort of higher power beyond the universe itself, which seems quite high and powerful enough to me. I don’t believe in life after death, channeled chat rooms with the dead, reincarnation, telekinesis or any miracles but the miracle of life and consciousness, which again strike me as miracles in nearly obscene abundance. I believe that the universe abides by the laws of physics, some of which are known, others of which will surely be discovered, but even if they aren’t, that will simply be a result, as my colleague George Johnson put it, of our brains having evolved for life on this one little planet and thus being inevitably limited. I’m convinced that the world as we see it was shaped by the again genuinely miraculous, let’s even say transcendent, hand of evolution through natural selection.

— Natalie Angier, “Confessions of a Lonely Atheist”, New York Times Sunday Magazine (January 14, 2001)[10]

This, in part, is why Angier was presented with the Freedom from Religion Foundation’s Emperor Has No Clothes Award in 2003.[11]

Personal lifeEdit

Angier married Rick Weiss on July 27, 1991.[12] Rick Weiss is a former science reporter for The Washington Post.[13] Angier and Weiss live in Takoma Park, Maryland[11] and have a daughter, Katherine Weiss Angier,[8] who graduated summa cum laude in 2018 from Princeton with a degree in Biology.[14]

Awards and honorsEdit

BooksEdit

  • Author: Natural Obsessions: Striving to Unlock the Deepest Secrets of the Cancer Cell, 1988, ISBN 0395924723 1999 Paperback
  • Contributor: New Science Journalists, 1995, ISBN 0345383656 Paperback
  • Author: The Beauty of the Beastly: New Views on the Nature of Life, 1995, ISBN 0395791472 1996 Paperback
  • Author: Woman: An Intimate Geography, 1999, ISBN 0544228103 2014 Paperback
  • Contributor: The Best American Science Writing 2000, 2000, ISBN 0060957360 Paperback
  • Contributor: The Best American Science Writing 2001, 2001, ISBN 0060936487 Paperback
  • Contributor: The Best American Science Writing 2002, 2002, ISBN 0060936509 Paperback
  • Editor: The Best American Science and Nature Writing 2002, 2002, ISBN 0618134786 Paperback
  • Contributor: The Bitch in the House: 26 Women Tell the Truth About Sex, Solitude, Work, Motherhood, and Marriage, 2002, ISBN 0060936460 Paperback
  • Contributor: When Race Becomes Real: Black and White Writers Confront Their Personal Histories, 2002, ISBN 155652448X Hardcover
  • Contributor: Sisterhood Is Forever: The Women’s Anthology for a New Millennium, 2003, ISBN 0743466276 Paperback
  • Contributor: The Best American Science Writing 2003, 2003, ISBN 0060936517 Paperback
  • Contributor: The Best American Science Writing 2005, 2005, ISBN 0060726423 Paperback
  • Contributor: The Best American Science Writing 2005, 2005, ISBN 0060726423 Paperback
  • Contributor: Axelrod & Cooper’s Concise Guide to Writing, 4th Edition, 2006, ISBN 0312434391 Paperback
  • Author: The Canon: A Whirligig Tour of the Beautiful Basics of Science, 2007, ISBN 0547053460 Paperback
  • Editor: The Best American Science Writing 2009, 2009, ISBN 9780061431661 Paperback
  • Author: Woman: An Intimate Geography, Revised and Updated Edition, 2014, ISBN 1844089908 Paperback

External linksEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "New York Times science writer Natalie Angier talks about her new book Woman: An Intimate Geog...". NPR. NPR. 24 March 1999. Archived from the original on 22 January 2019. Retrieved 22 January 2019.
  2. ^ a b c d e "Natalie Angier: Pulitzer prize winning science writer for The New York Times". Edge.org. Edge Foundation, Inc. Archived from the original on 8 September 2016. Retrieved 8 September 2016.
  3. ^ a b c d e f Darby, Ann (22 March 1999). "Natalie Angier: The Science Of Being Female". Publishers Weekly. PWxyz, LLC. Archived from the original on 24 January 2019. Retrieved 24 January 2019.
  4. ^ a b "AAAS Westinghouse Science Journalism Award - Newspapers (> 100,000 daily circulation)". AAAS. American Association for the Advancement of Science. Archived from the original on 15 April 2014. Retrieved 15 April 2014.
  5. ^ a b "Natalie Angier". Freedom From Religion Foundation. Freedom From Religion Foundation. Archived from the original on 23 January 2019. Retrieved 23 January 2019.
  6. ^ a b Brennan, Elizabeth; Clarage, Elizabeth (1999). Who’s Who of Pulitzer Prize Winners. Phonenix, Arizona: The Oryx Press. ISBN 1-57356-111-8. Retrieved 30 January 2019.
  7. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k "Natalie Angier". New York Times. The New York Times Company. See “More” link on page or page’s source code for referenced information. Archived from the original on 8 December 2018. Retrieved 8 December 2018.
  8. ^ a b c "Natalie Angier". The Santa Fe Science Writing Workshop. Archived from the original on 2 September 2018. Retrieved 2 September 2018.
  9. ^ a b "(untitled)". The American Heritage Dictionairy of the English Language. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. Archived from the original on 2 November 2017. Retrieved 2 November 2017.
  10. ^ "Positive Atheism's Big List of Quotations: Al-Aq". Positive Atheism. Cliff Walker. Archived from the original on 30 September 2007. Retrieved 30 September 2007.[dead link]
  11. ^ a b c "Emperor Has No Clothes Award: But What About the Tooth Fairy, Mom? Raising a Healthy God-free Child in a Hopelessly God-struck Nation". FFRF. Freedom From Religion Foundation. November 2003. Archived from the original on 30 April 2016. Retrieved 30 April 2016.
  12. ^ Angier, Natalie (30 July 2018). "Little-known tradition, because I just made it up: When your anniversary day and the number of years you've been married coincide--e.g., 27 years on July 27-- you're supposed to go trekking with llamas". Twitter. Twitter. Archived from the original on 28 January 2019. Retrieved 28 January 2019.
  13. ^ Weiss, Rick (20 July 2008). "What You Should Know Before You Spit Into That Test Tube". Washington Post. The Washington Post. Archived from the original on 10 November 2015. Retrieved 10 November 2015.
  14. ^ Angier, Natalie (1 June 2018). "We just learned that our hardworking daughter Katherine will graduate Princeton next week in biology--summa cum laude!". Twitter. Twitter. Archived from the original on 28 January 2019. Retrieved 28 January 2019.
  15. ^ "Christmas Books; Notable Books of the Year". New York Times. The New York Times Company. 4 December 1988. p. 13. Archived from the original on 25 May 2015. Retrieved 25 May 2015.
  16. ^ "Science Journalism Awards: 1992 Large Newspaper". AAAS. American Association for the Advancement of Science. Archived from the original on 28 January 2019. Retrieved 28 January 2019.
  17. ^ "Woman: An Intimate Geography by Natalie Angier". Library Thing. Library Thing. Archived from the original on 29 December 2014. Retrieved 29 December 2014.
  18. ^ "All Professors at Large: 1965 to June 30, 2023". Cornell University. Cornell University. Archived from the original on 15 June 2018. Retrieved 15 June 2018.
  19. ^ Bupp, Nathan (4 August 2008). "CSI's Robert P. Balles Award Goes to New York Times Science Writer Natalie Angier". Committee for Skeptical Inquiry (CSI). CSI. Archived from the original on 6 January 2018. Retrieved 6 January 2018.
  20. ^ a b c "The Canon by Natalie Angier". Library Thing. Library Thing. Archived from the original on 23 December 2015. Retrieved 23 December 2015.
  21. ^ "Congratulations to the Class of 2009". Jay Connected. Washington & Jefferson College, Office of Alumni Relations. Archived from the original on 29 January 2019. Retrieved 29 January 2019.