My World Is Empty Without You

"My World Is Empty Without You" is a 1965 song recorded and released as a single by the Supremes for the Motown label.

"My World Is Empty Without You"
1966 - My World Is Empty Without You.png
Single by the Supremes
from the album I Hear a Symphony
B-side"Everything Is Good About You"
ReleasedDecember 29, 1965
Recorded1965
StudioHitsville U.S.A. (Studio A)
GenreBaroque pop, soul
Length2:33
LabelMotown
M 1089
Songwriter(s)Holland–Dozier–Holland
Producer(s)Brian Holland
Lamont Dozier
The Supremes singles chronology
"I Hear a Symphony"
(1965)
"My World Is Empty Without You"
(1965)
"Love Is Like an Itching in My Heart"
(1966)
I Hear a Symphony track listing
12 tracks
Side one
  1. "Stranger in Paradise"
  2. "Yesterday"
  3. "I Hear a Symphony"
  4. "Unchained Melody"
  5. "With a Song in My Heart"
  6. "Without a Song"
Side two
  1. "My World Is Empty Without You"
  2. "A Lover's Concerto"
  3. "Any Girl in Love (Knows What I'm Going Through)"
  4. "Wonderful! Wonderful!"
  5. "Everything is Good About You"
  6. "He's All I Got"

OverviewEdit

Written and produced by Motown's main production team of Holland–Dozier–Holland, the song's fast tempo accompanies a somber lyric which delves into the feelings of depression which can set in after a breakup.

"My World Is Empty Without You" was one of the few songs written by the team for the Supremes to not reach number one, peaking at number five on the US pop chart for two weeks in February 1966[1] and at number 10 on the R&B chart; the single failed to chart on the UK Singles Chart. The group performed the song on the CBS hit variety program The Ed Sullivan Show on Sunday, February 20, 1966.[2]

Billboard described the song as being "right in their pulsating rhythm groove of 'I Hear a Symphony' with even more excitement in the performance."[3]

PersonnelEdit

ChartsEdit

CertificationsEdit

Region Certification Certified units/sales
United States 1,000,000[15][16]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Billboard Hot 100". Billboard. Nielsen Company. 78 (10): 18. 1966. Retrieved 18 May 2011.
  2. ^ "The Supremes, Dave Clark Five, Richard Kiley". The Ed Sullivan Show. Season 19. Episode 23. New York City. 20 February 1966. CBS. WCBS.
  3. ^ "Spotlight Singles" (PDF). Billboard. January 8, 1966. p. 18. Retrieved 2021-03-07.
  4. ^ "Every Unique AMR Top 100 Single of the 1966". Top 100 Singles. Retrieved 31 December 2020.
  5. ^ a b "Billboard HITS OF THE WORLD". Billboard. 5 March 1966. p. 34.
  6. ^ "Top RPM Singles: Issue 5703." RPM. Library and Archives Canada.
  7. ^ "The Supremes Chart History (Hot 100)". Billboard.
  8. ^ "The Supremes Chart History (Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Songs)". Billboard.
  9. ^ "CASH BOX Top 100 Singles". Cashbox. February 26, 1966. Retrieved 31 December 2020.
  10. ^ "The CASH BOX Top 50 In R&B Locations". Cashbox. March 5, 1966. Retrieved 31 December 2020.
  11. ^ "100 TOP POPS: Week of February 19, 1966" (PDF). Record World. worldradiohistory.com. February 19, 1966. Retrieved 29 January 2021.
  12. ^ "TOP 40 R&B: Week of February 19, 1966" (PDF). Record World. worldradiohistory.com. February 19, 1966. p. 20. Retrieved 29 January 2021.
  13. ^ "Top 100 Hits of 1964/Top 100 Songs of 1966". Musicoutfitters.com. Retrieved 2016-09-27.
  14. ^ "The CASH BOX Year-End Charts: 1966". Cashbox. Retrieved 31 December 2020.
  15. ^ Jay Warner (20 January 1973). "Announcing Motown's Yesteryear Series: two million-selling singles on one record". Billboard. Vol. 85 no. 3. Nielsen Business Media, Inc. p. 63. ISSN 0006-2510. Retrieved 24 January 2020.
  16. ^ Joseph Murrells (1984). "THE SUPREMES". Million Selling Records from the 1900s to the 1980s: An Illustrated Directory. London, W1H: B.T. Batsford. p. 233. ISBN 0-7134-3843-6.CS1 maint: location (link)

External linksEdit