Mr. Fish is the name of two fictional supervillains appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics.

Mr. Fish
Power029a.jpg
Mr. Fish as seen on the cover of Luke Cage, Power Man #29.
Publication information
PublisherMarvel Comics
First appearanceLuke Cage, Power Man #29 (April, 1975)
Created byBill Mantlo
George Tuska
In-story information
Alter egoMortimer George Norris
Bill Norris
Team affiliationsMr. Fish I:
Maggia
Mr. Fish II:
Flashmob
Notable aliasesMr. Fish I:
Mort
AbilitiesAmphibious physiology
Enhanced strength

Publication historyEdit

The Mortimer Norris version of Mr. Fish first appeared in Luke Cage, Power Man #29 and was created by Bill Mantlo and George Tuska. Initially, Luke Cage, Power Man #29 was intended to continue a storyline from the 28th issue. The continuation of that story was running late. Because of these deadline considerations, the splash page admits, this fill-in story, "No One Laughs at Mr. Fish", was created to ensure #29 hit the stands on schedule.

The Bill Morris version of Mr. Fish first appeared in Daughters of the Dragon #4 and was created by Justin Gray, Jimmy Palmiotti, and Khari Evans.

Fictional character biographyEdit

Mortimer NorrisEdit

Mr. Fish was once an ordinary human being, a petty crook named Mortimer George Norris who stumbled upon some stolen radioactive material while on a job. The exposure made him dizzy and caused him to fall into the East River. When he emerged, he had been mutated into an amphibious fish-man with enhanced strength. He used these powers to establish a Maggia branch in his area, aided by a group of thugs and his second-in-command, a dwarf named "Shrike". This attempt was cut short by a battle with Luke Cage. Mr. Fish initially seemed to have the upper hand: his men overpowered Cage and Fish himself used a mysterious concussive ray gun to knock Cage out, taking him to a deserted construction site. However, and despite Shrike's advice to finish Cage off before he awoke, Mr. Fish waited until Cage awoke so that he could recount his origin and master plan. Cage got his second wind and made short work of Fish's men. In a desperate move, Fish rushed towards Cage with a steel girder, but Cage dodged and Fish fell off the building, seemingly dying on impact.[1]

Mr. Fish turns up alive during the "All-New, All-Different Marvel" to warn Tombstone that the Black Cat will be targeting him and his criminal empire during an upcoming gang war for control of Harlem.[2] Burgeoning crime lord Alex Wilder later crashes one of Tombstone and Mr. Fish's meetings, beating the former and magically banishing the latter to Hell.[3] After recovering from the attack, Tombstone rescues Mr. Fish from Hell with the help of Black Talon.[4]

Bill NorrisEdit

Bill Norris, the first Mr. Fish's similarly-mutated brother,[5] was introduced visiting an exotic nightclub with the Walrus.[6] He subsequently joined the Flashmob, a group of former opponents of Luke Cage, during Shadowland. The assemblage of villains confront the new Power Man, and are remanded to Ryker's Island after being defeated by him and Iron Fist. A few members of the Flashmob, including Mr. Fish, are eventually bailed out by Big Ben Donovan.[7]

When a virus begins giving people spider-powers similar to Spider-Man's during the "Spider-Island" storyline, Mr. Fish and the rest of the Flashmob are among those infected, prompting them to try and escape from the quarantined Manhattan. They are prevented from doing so by the Heroes for Hire.[8]

Powers and abilitiesEdit

Mr. Fish has enhanced strength, a fish-like appearance, and a gun.

Other versionsEdit

Marvel AdventuresEdit

This version of Mr. Fish was about to enact his master plan only for him and his henchmen to encounter the Fantastic Four. Human Torch used his flames to dehydrate Mr. Fish, enough for a police officer to knock him out and arrest him.[9]

In other mediaEdit

TelevisionEdit

  • A variation of the Mortimer Norris version of Mr. Fish appears in season 2 of Luke Cage, portrayed by Hakim Callender. While he still has the nickname "Mr. Fish", he does not possess any superhuman abilities and resembles a normal man. He and his gang approach Misty Knight and Colleen Wing while they are having drinks in a bar and plans to assault Misty as retaliation for her sending his brother Bill to Dannemora. Misty manages to fight Mortimer and overpower him despite only having one arm to punch, while Colleen makes short work of his lackeys. Both of them leave as Misty tells the bartender to put their drinks on Mortimer's tab.[10]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Luke Cage, Power Man #29
  2. ^ David Walker (w), Sanford Greene (p), Sanford Greene (i), Lee Loughridge (col), VC's Clayton Cowles (let), Jake Thomas (ed). Power Man and Iron Fist v3, #10 (9 November 2016), United States: Marvel Comics
  3. ^ David F. Walker (w), Sanford Greene (p), Sanford Greene (i), Lee Loughridge (col), VC's Clayton Cowles (let), Jake Thomas (ed). Power Man and Iron Fist v3, #11 (14 December 2016), United States: Marvel Comics
  4. ^ David F. Walker (w), Sanford Greene (p), Sanford Greene (i), Lee Loughridge (col), VC's Clayton Cowles (let), Jake Thomas (ed). Power Man and Iron Fist v3, #14 (8 March 2017), United States: Marvel Comics
  5. ^ Spider-Man: Back in Black Handbook #1
  6. ^ Daughters of the Dragon #4
  7. ^ Shadowland: Power Man #2
  8. ^ Spider-Island: Heroes for Hire #1
  9. ^ Fantastic Four Giant-Size Adventures #1
  10. ^ Jobst, Marc (director); Matt Owens (writer) (June 22, 2018). "Wig Out". Marvel's Luke Cage. Season 2. Episode 3. Netflix.

External linksEdit

  • Mr. Fish I at the Appendix to the Handbook of the Marvel Universe
  • Mr. Fish II at the Appendix to the Handbook of the Marvel Universe