Mount Evans Hill Climb

The Bob Cook Memorial Mount Evans Hill Climb or Mount Evans Hill Climb is a bicycle race situated on Mount Evans near Idaho Springs, Colorado. Begun in 1962, the race has been held every year since except for three cancellations. In 1981, it was renamed in honor of five-time race winner Bob Cook, who died of cancer at the age of 23. The race is 27.4 miles (44.1 kilometers) in length and ascends 6,590 feet (2,010 m).

Bob Cook Memorial Mount Evans Hill Climb
Race details
DateJuly
RegionMount Evans, Colorado, USA
English nameBob Cook Memorial Mount Evans Hill Climb
Nickname(s)Mt. Evans Hillclimb
DisciplineRoad race
TypeOne-day race
History
First edition1962 (1962)
Editions54
First winnerStuart Baillie and Adolph Weller (tie)
Most wins Scott Moninger (USA) (6 times)

The race takes place on the highest paved road in the United States, starting at an altitude of 7,540 feet (2,298 meters) and terminating at 14,130 feet (4,306 meters), 130 feet (39 meters) below Mount Evans' summit.[1] Due to the altitude, the event is sometimes marked by inclement weather.

Over the years, the race has attracted significant professional riders. Riders come from all over the United States and in the past the race has had riders from France, Switzerland, Germany, and Australia compete. The age range of the participants is from nine to eighty-five years. The race is also supported by volunteers from the Colorado cycling community who help marshal, drive support, officiate and work the picnic. The event includes categories for all levels of racing and encourages riders of all abilities. Between six hundred and a thousand riders compete each year in a number of categories.

Course recordsEdit

Bob Cook held the course record from 1975-1980. The first three years he held the record he was a junior. The present men's record is held by Tom Danielson, set in 2004 with a time of 1:41:20. The women's course record is held by Jeannie Longo of France at 1:59:19.

Canceled yearsEdit

The race was canceled three times: twice due to snow and once when the race director was in Atlanta at the 1996 Summer Olympics.

List of winnersEdit

Women competed in the race beginning in 1976. The winners of the race are:[2]

Year Men's Winner Time Women's Winner Time
1962 Stuart Baillie/Adolph Weller 2:28[note 1]
1963 Stuart Baillie 2:24[note 1]
1964 Stuart Baillie 2:08:07[note 1]
1965 Michael Hiltner 2:09:55
1966 Stuart Baillie 2:14
1967 [note 2] [note 2]
1968 Mike Dennis N/A
1969 Stan Justice 2:19:23
1970 Kalman Halasi 2:22:49
1971 Kalman Halasi 2:14:35
1972 Bob Poling 2:11:41
1973 Jack Janelle 2:05:32[note 1]
1974 Jack Janelle 2:05:09[note 1]
1975 Bob Cook 2:02:55[note 1]
1976 Bob Cook 1:57:50[note 1] Robin Deily 2:44:58 [note 1]
1977 Bob Cook 1:55:43[note 1] [note 2] [note 2]
1978 Bob Cook 1:54:27[note 1] Margaret Nettles 1:18:44 [note 3]
1979 [note 4] [note 4] [note 4] [note 4]
1980 Bob Cook 1:54:55 Margaret Nettles 2:41:10 [note 1]
1981 Alexi Grewal 1:57:36 Martha Stafford 2:29:54 [note 1]
1982 Don Spence 1:58:12 Jan DeYoung 2:28:33 [note 1]
1983 Todd Gogulski 1:53:43[note 1] Ann Chernoff 2:24:37 [note 1]
1984 Alexi Grewal 1:47:51[note 1] Denise Yamagishi 2:23:45 [note 1]
1985 Ned Overend 1:49:53 Barb Dolan 2:15:58 [note 1]
1986 Ned Overend 1:49:22 Catherine Porter 2:22:58
1987 Todd Gogulski 1:54:07 Vanessa Brines 2:26:03
1988 Tom Resh 1:51:56 Darien Raistrick 2:19:46
1989 [note 4] [note 4] [note 4] [note 4]
1990 Alexi Grewal 1:46:29[note 1] Darien Raistrick 2:13:59 [note 1]
1991 Mike Engleman 1:51:41[note 1] Darien Raistrick 2:23:10
1992 Mike Engleman 1:45:30 Linda Brenneman 2:15;24
1993 Mike Engleman 1:56:57 Jan Bolland 2:32:21
1994 Mike Engleman 1:50:35 Eve Stephenson 2:25:43
1995 Mike Engleman 1:46:32 Linda Jackson 2:13:28 [note 1]
1996 [note 5] [note 5] [note 5] [note 5]
1997 Jonathan Vaughters 1:53:54 [note 6] Julie Hudetz 2:18:22
1998 Scott Moninger 1:52:16 Jeannie Longo 1:59:19 [note 7]
1999 Jonathan Vaughters Emily Robbins 2:09:58
2000 Scott Moninger 1:49:42 Kimberly Bruckner 2:09:00
2001 Scott Moninger 1:46:56 Karen Bockel 2:22:15
2002 Scott Moninger 1:50:20 Kimberly Bruckner 2:05:31
2003 Jonathan Vaughters 1:49:29 Allison Lusby 2:09:29
2004 Tom Danielson 1:41:20[note 8] Ann Trombley 2:19:03
2005 Scott Moninger 1:52:50 Mara Abbott 2:20:10
2006 Scott Moninger 1:49:52 Mara Abbott 2:11:55
2007 Tom Danielson 1:43:04 Michelle Steiner 2:22:04
2008 Kevin Nicol 1:53:21 Jeannie Longo 2:10:10
2009 Tom Danielson 1:42:09 Jennifer Slawta 2:15:58
2010 Peter Stetina 1:50:20 Tammy Jacques-Grewal 2:15:07
2011 LeRoy Popowski 1:57:36 Tammy Jacques-Grewal 2:13:24
2012 LeRoy Popowski 1:51:02 Tammy Jacques-Grewal 2:08:08
2013 Christopher Carr 1:57:16 Annie Toth 2:19:30
2014 Fortunato Ferrara 1:51:22 Mara Abbott 2:14:12
2015 Lachlan Morton 1:48:05 Mara Abbott 2:19:16
2016 Chris Butler 1:50:19 Annie Toth 2:17:40
2017 Chad Haga 1:43:39 Mara Abbott 2:16:35
2018 Gregory Daniel 1:49:51 Flavia Oliviera 2:16:26
2019 Keegan Swirbul 1:43:53 Annie Toth 2:16:05

Race notesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v New record time
  2. ^ a b c d Race was held, but no results are available.
  3. ^ Race finished at Echo Lake.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h Race not held (snow).
  5. ^ a b c d Race not held (organizer at 1996 Olympic Games).
  6. ^ Mat Anand, a Canadian National Team member was the first across the line, but was relegated to second place for ‘hooking’ Jonathan Vaughters in the final sprint.
  7. ^ Current Record
  8. ^ Current Record

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Archived copy" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2008-10-11. Retrieved 2008-04-15. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link) CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  2. ^ "Archived copy" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2008-10-11. Retrieved 2008-04-15. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link) CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)