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Moro Witch Doctor (aka Amok) is a 1964 Filipino action film written and directed by Eddie Romero, and co-produced by Romero, Kane W. Lynn and Irwin Pizor (doing business as "Hemisphere Pictures"). The film stars Jock Mahoney, Margia Dean, Pancho Magalona, Reed Hadley, Paraluman, Vic Diaz and Michael Parsons. The film was shot back to back with The Walls of Hell.[1]

Moro Witch Doctor
Moro Witch Doctor poster.jpg
Theatrical release poster
Directed byEddie Romero
Produced byEddie Romero
Kane W. Lynn
Screenplay byEddie Romero
StarringJock Mahoney
Margia Dean
Vic Diaz
Reed Hadley
Paraluman
Michael Parsons
Music byAriston Avelino
CinematographyFelipe Sacdalan
Edited byJoven Calub
Production
company
Distributed by20th Century Fox
Release date
  • November 1964 (1964-11)
Running time
90 minutes (Philippines)
61 minutes (US version)
CountryUnited States
Philippines
LanguageEnglish
Budgetless than $65,000[1]

The film originally ran 90 minutes. It was sold to Robert L. Lippert who arranged for it to be released in November 1964, by 20th Century Fox in a 61-minute version.[1][2][3]

Contents

PlotEdit

CIA agent Jefferson Stark is ordered to the Philippines to investigate the double homicide of two American plantation owners, Cameron and Kruger. Authorities believe the two were killed as a result of local gun smuggling and drug dealing. Cameron's sister Paula helps Stark in his investigation, and learns her brother is still alive and has gone into hiding from the syndicate. Stark discovers the plantation is all just a cover for the crime ring's smuggling operations. A fanatical cult leader named Datu Sumlang tries to buy the property, but when Paula refuses to sell, her brother's ex-friends start getting murdered. Stark uses Paula as a lure by telling her to meet him in Manila with a suitcase full of money. She gets attacked by the supposedly dead Kruger, and Stark comes to Paula's aid and kills him. With Kruger's death, the crime ring dissolves and her brother Cameron is exonerated.

CastEdit

ProductionEdit

Margia Dean later recalled "It was a dangerous film to do. That was really roughing it. We had machine-gunned guards all along... Jock Mahoney was not very pleasant to work with... He was a pompous ass."[4]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c Ray, Fred Olen (1991). The New Poverty Row: Independent Filmmakers as Distributors. McFarland. p. 65.
  2. ^ "Moro Witch Doctor (1964) - Overview". TCM.com. 1964-10-28. Retrieved 2015-09-15.
  3. ^ "Moro-Witch-Doctor - Trailer - Cast - Showtimes". NYTimes.com. Retrieved 2015-09-15.
  4. ^ http://www.westernclippings.com/interview/margiadean_interview.shtml

External linksEdit