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Native HistoryEdit

When only Native Americans lived in the area, and for a time after, a major trading trail went over Mono Pass and through Bloody Canyon to Mono Lake, just to the east of the Yosemite area.[2][3][4][5][6]

The location of Mono PassEdit

Mono Pass is just outside of Yosemite National Park, though the trail starts along the Tioga Road 1.4 miles (2.3 km) east of the entrance, inside the park.[1]

 
A tarn, on the Mono Pass Trail

As to hiking, there are a wealth of references.[7][1][8][9][10][6]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c "Mono Pass Trail, Yosemite National Park". americansouthwest.net. Retrieved 1 February 2019.
  2. ^ "Yosemite Nature Notes" (PDF). yosemite.ca.us. October 1, 1953. Retrieved 1 February 2019.
  3. ^ "Scenic Vista Management Plan for Yosemite National Park" (PDF). NPS. July 1, 2010. Retrieved 1 February 2019.
  4. ^ Ewart, Dick (1978). "Mono Pass and Bloody Canyon". yosemite.ca.us. Retrieved 2 February 2019.
  5. ^ Gregory, Candace (September 3, 2017). "Hiking up to Mono Pass Trail's High Lakes". Hiking up to Mono Pass Trail’s High Lakes. sierranewsonline.com. Retrieved 2 February 2019.
  6. ^ a b Shannon, Betty (November 1, 1978). "The Mono Pass – Bloody Canyon Trail" (PDF). Owens Valley History. Retrieved 2 February 2019.
  7. ^ "Mono Pass". yosemite.com. Retrieved 1 February 2019.
  8. ^ Cary, Russ. "Yosemite Hikes Home » Tioga Pass Road » Mono Pass". yosemitehikes.com. Retrieved 1 February 2019.
  9. ^ Shields, Allan (1960). "Mono Pass and historic Golden Crown Mines". yosemite.ca.us. Retrieved 1 February 2019.
  10. ^ "Golden Crown Mine". NPS. March 1, 2015. Retrieved 2 February 2019.
  11. ^ "Ruby Peak, (0.7 mi SW of Ruby Lake)". summitpost.org. Retrieved 2 February 2019.

External linksEdit