Great Basin Divide

The Great Basin Divide in the western United States is the ridgeline that separates the Great Basin from the Pacific Ocean watershed, which completely surrounds it.

Great Basin Divide
Geography
CountriesUnited States and Mexico
Parent rangeNorth America
Great Basin Divide
Columbia/ Klamath
Columbia/ Klamath
44.1°N (Silvies R divide)
44.1°N (Silvies R divide)
Dean Pass
Dean
Pass
Great Basin Divide
Columbia/Colorado
Columbia/Colorado
Great Basin Divide
Great Basin Divide
Great Basin Divide
Klamath/ Sacramento
Klamath/ Sacramento
Great Basin Divide
Pegleg Mtn
Pegleg Mtn
Peeler Lake
Peeler Lake
Crumbly Sp[1]
Crumbly Sp[1]
Great Basin Divide
31.46°N
31.46°N
Great Basin Divide
Pink pog.svg-triple pt,[1] Cyan pog.svg-overflow pt, Black pog.svg-border, Red pog.svg-other
Map all coordinates using: OpenStreetMap 
Download coordinates as: KML · GPX

The Great Basin is the largest set of contiguous endorheic watersheds of North America, including six entire USGS watershed subregions.[2] It contains the watersheds of several large prehistoric and still-existing lakes, most notably Lake Bonneville, Lake Lahontan, Lake Manly, and the Salton Sea. As such, it occupies most of present-day Nevada, about half of Utah, large parts of eastern California and Oregon, and small parts of Idaho, Wyoming, and Baja California. The arid climate of this area ensures that none of the major lake basins are filled to overflowing, and thus no precipitation falling into them reaches the sea.

On the other hand, precipitation falling on the exterior of the Great Basin Divide does (theoretically) reach the Pacific Ocean, through a number of different channels. Roughly speaking, the area to the north and northeast of the Great Basin drains into the Columbia River, mostly via the Snake River. Likewise, the area to the south and southeast drains into the Colorado River, a good part of it via the Green River. The area west of the Great Basin is drained by the Klamath River, the Central Valley of California (Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers), and various small rivers of southern California and northern Baja.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b "USA Lower 48 Triple Divide Points". PeakBagger.com. Retrieved 2011-11-13.
  2. ^ "Boundary Descriptions and Names of Regions, Subregions, Accounting Units and Cataloging Units". USGS.gov. Retrieved 2010-06-07.