Modern pentathlon at the 1976 Summer Olympics

The modern pentathlon at the 1976 Summer Olympics was represented by two events (both for men): Individual competition and Team competition.[1] As usual in Olympic modern pentathlon, one competition was held and each competitor's score was included to the Individual competition event results table and was also added to his teammates' scores to be included to the Team competition event results table. This competition consisted of 5 disciplines:

Men's modern pentathlon
at the Games of the XXI Olympiad
DatesJuly 18–22
Competitors47 from 17 nations
← 1972
1980 →

Boris Onischenko of the Soviet Union was ejected from the competition during the fencing event after it was discovered he had wired his epée with a concealed push button circuit breaker that enabled him to register a hit at any time. Onischenko's results were deleted from the records, and he was spirited away from the Olympic Village almost immediately, never competing in events outside the USSR again.[2]

The other Soviet team members, Pavel Lednev and Boris Mosolov, were allowed to continue individually, but as three athletes are required to compete in a team event, it was ruled that their results would receive no score in the team competition.

Participating nationsEdit

A total of 47 athletes from 17 nations competed at the Montreal Games:[1]

Medal summaryEdit

Event Gold Silver Bronze
Individual
details
Janusz Pyciak-Peciak
  Poland
Pavel Lednyov
  Soviet Union
Jan Bártů
  Czechoslovakia
Team
details
  Great Britain (GBR)
Jim Fox
Danny Nightingale
Adrian Parker
  Czechoslovakia (TCH)
Jan Bártů
Bohumil Starnovský
Jiří Adam
  Hungary (HUN)
Tamás Kancsal
Tibor Maracskó
Szvetiszláv Sasics

Medal tableEdit

RankNationGoldSilverBronzeTotal
1  Great Britain (GBR)1001
  Poland (POL)1001
3  Czechoslovakia (TCH)0112
4  Soviet Union (URS)0101
5  Hungary (HUN)0011
Totals (5 nations)2226

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b "Modern pentathlon: 1976 Olympic Results". sports-reference.com. Archived from the original on 2020-04-17. Retrieved 2012-08-24.
  2. ^ Wallechinsky, David (1984). The Complete Book of the Olympics. England: Penguin Books. p. 345. ISBN 0140066322.

External linksEdit