Michael L. Chapman

Michael Louis Chapman (born October 8, 1957) is a law enforcement executive who is the current sheriff of Loudoun County, Virginia.

Michael L. Chapman
Michael L. Chapman outside in Leesburg, Virginia.jpg
Sheriff of Loudoun County, Virginia
Assumed office
January 1, 2012
Preceded byStephen O'Neil Simpson
Personal details
Born (1957-10-08) October 8, 1957 (age 63)
Washington, D.C., U.S.
Political partyRepublican
Spouse(s)Ann (Rafferty) Chapman
Children6
EducationTroy University
University of Maryland

Early lifeEdit

Chapman was born in Washington, D.C. and began his law enforcement career with the Howard County Police Department (Maryland) in 1978. Chapman joined the Drug Enforcement Administration in 1985, and retired in 2008. Chapman was elected as Sheriff in Loudoun County, Virginia in November 2011, officially taking office on January 1, 2012.[1] He has since been re-elected in 2015[2] and 2019,[3] beginning his third term in January 2020.

Chapman has a Bachelor of Science in Business Management from the University of Maryland, and a Masters in Public Administration from Troy University, Alabama.[4]

Sheriff of Loudoun CountyEdit

Chapman has prioritized initiatives in the areas of service, technology, efficiency and professionalism in all of his campaigns for election.[5] Some of his most notable initiatives have been providing Crisis Intervention Team (CIT) training for all sworn deputies and dispatchers, [6] collaborating with mental health providers to open the Crisis Intervention Team Assessment Center (CITAC),[7] expanding the Drug Abuse Resistance Education (D.A.R.E) program to include elementary and middle schools,[8] establishing the a multi-disciplinary team to reduce opioid issues,[9] instituting a Cold Case Initiative to revitalize investigation of unsolved crimes,[10] and expanding education and outreach programs to include internet safety,[11] prescription and synthetic drug awareness,[12] and the dangers of vaping.[13]

National positionsEdit

Chapman has held national-level leadership positions with the Major County Sheriff's of America,[14] the National Sheriffs' Association,[15] and the D.A.R.E. Executive Law Enforcement Advisory Board.[16] In 2020, Chapman was appointed Chair of the Homeland Security Working Group[17] on the Presidential Commission on Law Enforcement and the Administration of Justice[18]

BibliographyEdit

  • "Mental Health Training for Law Enforcement is Key to Handling Crises," The Hill[19]
  • "A Grave Injustice," Richmond Times-Dispatch[20]
  • "Responding to Mental Health Emergencies: Crisis Intervention Training in Loudoun County," The Police Chief [21]
  • "HOT Program Makes Opioid Crisis Go Cold," Sheriff & Deputy[22]
  • "This is the Meaningful, Effective Prison Reform the US Badly Needs," The Hill[23]
  • "Leadership in a Sheriff's Campaign," FBI-LEEDA Insighter [24]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Jackman, Tom (May 7, 2012). "New Loudoun Sheriff Mike Chapman makes fast progress after taking office". Washington Post. Retrieved February 9, 2020.
  2. ^ "Virginia election results: Nov. 3, 2015". November 3, 2015. Retrieved February 9, 2020.
  3. ^ "UPDATED: All Loudoun County Election Results: 2019". Loudoun Times-Mirror. November 5, 2019. Retrieved February 9, 2020.
  4. ^ "Getting to Know Your Virginia Sheriffs – Loudoun County Sheriff Mike Chapman". Virginia Sheriffs' Association. August 19, 2019. Retrieved February 11, 2020.
  5. ^ "On The Ballot: The Constitutional Officers". Loudoun Now. October 23, 2019. Retrieved February 11, 2020.
  6. ^ Edmunds, Chantalle (December 18, 2017). "Loudoun sheriff's office celebrates Crisis Intervention Training milestone". Loudoun Times-Mirror. Retrieved February 9, 2020.
  7. ^ "Loudoun County opens Crisis Intervention Team Center". Loudoun Times-Mirror. September 29, 2015. Retrieved February 11, 2020.
  8. ^ Owens, Crystal (August 28, 2012). "D.A.R.E. expands to Loudoun's middle schools". Loudoun Times-Mirror. Retrieved February 9, 2020.
  9. ^ Bateman, Scott (April 3, 2015). "Loudoun Sheriff's Office announces Heroin Operations Team amid uptick in overdoses". Loudoun Times-Mirror. Retrieved February 11, 2020.
  10. ^ Owens, Crystal (August 18, 2012). "LTM Editorial: Heating up a cold case". Loudoun Times-Mirror. Retrieved February 9, 2020.
  11. ^ Owens, Crystal (February 11, 2013). "LSCO Internet Safety Course tonight at Briar Woods High School". Loudoun Times-Mirror. Retrieved February 9, 2020.
  12. ^ "Chapman Gets National Award For Drug Education Outreach". Loudoun Now. June 27, 2017. Retrieved February 11, 2020.
  13. ^ "Sheriff's office aims to educate Loudoun youth on vaping". Loudoun Times-Mirror. September 6, 2019. Retrieved February 9, 2020.
  14. ^ "Leadership". Major County Sheriffs of America. Retrieved February 9, 2020.
  15. ^ "Committees". National Sheriffs' Association. Retrieved February 11, 2020.
  16. ^ "Getting to Know Your Virginia Sheriffs – Loudoun County Sheriff Mike Chapman". D.A.R.E. August 23, 2019. Retrieved February 11, 2020.
  17. ^ "Working Groups". www.justice.gov. February 18, 2020. Retrieved April 5, 2020.
  18. ^ "Presidential Commission on Law Enforcement and the Administration of Justice". www.justice.gov. February 18, 2020. Retrieved April 5, 2020.
  19. ^ Chapman, Michael (April 14, 2021). "Mental Health Training for Law Enforcement is Key to Handling Crises". The Hill. Retrieved April 19, 2012.
  20. ^ Chapman, Mike (May 26, 2020). "Mike Chapman Column: A Grave Injustice". Richmond Times-Dispatch. Retrieved April 19, 2021.
  21. ^ Chapman, Michael (September 2014). "Responding to Mental Health Emergencies: Crisis Intervention Training in Loudoun County". The Police Chief. 81: 34–37.
  22. ^ Chapman, Michael (2018). "HOT Program Makes Opioid Crisis Go Cold". Sheriff & Deputy. S: 24–29.
  23. ^ Chapman, Michael (July 31, 2018). "This is the meaningful, effective prison reform the US badly needs". The Hill. Retrieved February 12, 2020.
  24. ^ Chapman, Michael (November 2012). "Leadership in a Sheriff's Campaign" (PDF). FBI-LEEDA Insighter. III: 11–13.