Open main menu

Michael Hirsh is a senior correspondent and the deputy news editor for Foreign Policy magazine. He is the former national editor for Politico magazine.

Hirsh is the former foreign editor, chief diplomatic correspondent and national economic correspondent for Newsweek, as well as a former member of JournoList. He is a lecturer and has appeared numerous times as a commentator on Fox News, CNN, MSNBC, National Public Radio, and is a frequent guest of The Young Turks, a streaming internet political talk show. In addition to Newsweek, he has written for The Washington Post, Politico Magazine, The New York Times Book Review, The New York Review of Books, Foreign Affairs, Harper's, and Washington Monthly. Hirsh was co-winner of the Overseas Press Club award for best magazine reporting from abroad in 2001 for "prescience in identifying the al Qaeda threat half a year before the September 11 attacks" and for Newsweek's coverage of the war on terror, which also won a National Magazine Award. Hirsh also co-authored (with Rod Nordland) the November 3, 2003 cover story, "Bush's $87 Billion Mess," about the Iraq reconstruction plan, one of three issues that won Newsweek its second National Magazine Award for General Excellence in three years. He lives in Northwest, Washington, D.C..

Hirsh is the author of two books:

  • Capital Offense: How Washington’s Wise Men Turned America’s Future over to Wall Street (2010),[1][2] is a narrative history of the best and brightest of the economic and political world from the Reagan revolution on, with a focus on the era of Greenspan, Rubin and Summers in the ‘90s, the Bush years, and culminating in the financial disaster and the attempts to fix the system afterward. Michiko Kakutani of The New York Times called the book “provocative” and “highly informed,” saying it “makes for useful and succinct reading at a time when the state of the economy — and President Obama’s handling of the recession — are being vociferously debated in Washington and around the country.”
  • At War with Ourselves: Why America is Squandering Its Chance to Build a Better World (hardcover, 2003; paperback, 2004), is a look at the psycho-dynamics of America’s ambivalent stewardship of the global system. The New York Times reviewer, Bill Keller, wrote that it displayed “well-informed, historically literate, non-ideological common sense” that was “something to be treasured.”

ReferencesEdit

External linksEdit