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Merle K. (Mudhole) Smith Airport (IATA: CDV, ICAO: PACV, FAA LID: CDV) is a state owned, public use airport located 11 nautical miles (13 mi, 20 km) southeast of the central business district of Cordova, a city in the Valdez-Cordova Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska which has no road access to the outside world.[1] Airline service is subsidized by the Essential Air Service program.

Merle K. (Mudhole) Smith Airport
CDV-b.jpg
Summary
Airport typePublic
OwnerState of Alaska DOT&PF - Northern Region
ServesCordova, Alaska
Elevation AMSL54 ft / 16 m
Coordinates60°29′30″N 145°28′39″W / 60.49167°N 145.47750°W / 60.49167; -145.47750Coordinates: 60°29′30″N 145°28′39″W / 60.49167°N 145.47750°W / 60.49167; -145.47750
Map
CDV is located in Alaska
CDV
CDV
Location of airport in Alaska
Runways
Direction Length Surface
ft m
9/27 7,500 2,286 Asphalt
16/34 1,899 579 Gravel
Statistics (2016)
Aircraft operations13,605
Based aircraft29
Passengers36,860
Freight3,467,000 lbs

As per Federal Aviation Administration records, the airport had 16,640 passenger boardings (enplanements) in calendar year 2008,[2] 15,372 enplanements in 2009, and 17,856 in 2010.[3] It is included in the National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2015-2019, which categorized it as a primary commercial service (nonhub) airport (more than 10,000 enplanements per year) based on 16,061 enplanements in 2012.[4] The airport is named after Merle K. Smith, also known as "Mudhole", a pilot who in 1939 became president of Cordova Airlines, which used the airport as a hub between 1934 and 1968.[5] Cordova Airlines was acquired by Alaska Airlines in 1968.

Facilities and aircraftEdit

Merle K. (Mudhole) Smith Airport covers an area of 2,959 acres (1,197 ha) at an elevation of 54 feet (16 m) above mean sea level. It has two runways: 9/27 is 7,500 by 150 feet (2,286 x 46 m) with an asphalt surface; 16/34 is 1,899 by 30 feet (579 x 9 m) with a gravel surface.[1]

For the 12-month period ending January 1, 2011, the airport had 14,040 aircraft operations, an average of 38 per day: 46% general aviation, 29% air taxi, 18% scheduled commercial, and 7% military. At that time there were 30 aircraft based at this airport: 93% single-engine and 7% helicopter.[1]

Alaska Airlines operates Boeing 737 jets to the airport, the largest airplanes flying to Cordova. Alaska is the only jet aircraft operator to the airport.

Airlines and destinationsEdit

PassengerEdit

AirlinesDestinations
Alaska Airlines Anchorage, Seattle/Tacoma, Juneau, Yakutat[6]
Ravn Alaska
operated by Corvus Airlines
Anchorage[7]

StatisticsEdit

Carrier shares: January – December 2016[8]
Carrier   Passengers (arriving and departing)
Alaska
27,960(75.85%)
Corvus
8,900(24.15%)
Top domestic destinations: January – December 2016[8]
Rank City Airport Passengers
1 Anchorage, AK Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport 15,100
2 Seattle/Tacoma, WA Seattle–Tacoma International Airport 2,290
3 Juneau, AK Juneau International Airport 980
4 Yakutat, AK Yakutat Airport 140

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d FAA Airport Master Record for CDV (Form 5010 PDF). Federal Aviation Administration. effective April 27, 2017.
  2. ^ "Enplanements for CY 2008" (PDF, 1.0 MB). faa.gov. Federal Aviation Administration. December 18, 2009.
  3. ^ "Enplanements for CY 2010" (PDF, 189 KB). faa.gov. Federal Aviation Administration. October 4, 2011.
  4. ^ "Appendix A: List of NPIAS Airports with 5-Year Forecast Activity and Development Estimate" (PDF). National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems (NPIAS) Report. Federal Aviation Administration. Archived from the original (PDF, 7.89 MB) on February 22, 2016. Retrieved May 23, 2016.
  5. ^ [1]
  6. ^ "Alaska Destinations". (retrieved May 4, 2017)
  7. ^ "Ravn Alaska Destinations". (retrieved January 9, 2017)
  8. ^ a b "Cordova, AK: Cordova (CDV)". Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS), Research and Innovative Technology Administration (RITA), U.S. Department of Transportation. December 2016. Retrieved May 4, 2017.

Other sourcesEdit

  • Essential Air Service documents (Docket OST-1998-4899) from the U.S. Department of Transportation:
    • Order 2004-5-5 (May 4, 2004): tentatively reselects Alaska Airlines, Inc., to provide subsidized essential air service at Cordova, Gustavus, Petersburg, Wrangell, and Yakutat (southeast) Alaska, for the period from October 1, 2003, through April 30, 2006, at an annual rate of $5,723,008.
    • Order 2006-3-20 (March 22, 2006): re-selecting Alaska Airlines, Inc., to provide subsidized essential air service at Cordova, Gustavus, Petersburg, Wrangell, and Yakutat (southeast) Alaska, for the period from May 1, 2006, through April 30, 2009.
    • Order 2009-2-3 (February 9, 2009): re-selecting Alaska Airlines, Inc., to provide essential air service (EAS) at Cordova, Gustavus, and Yakutat, for an annual subsidy rate of $5,793,201 and at Petersburg and Wrangell at an annual subsidy rate of $1,347,195, through April 30, 2011.
    • Order 2011-2-1 (February 1, 2011): re-selecting Alaska Airlines, Inc., to provide essential air service (EAS) at Cordova, Gustavus, and Yakutat, for an annual subsidy rate of $4,486,951 and at Petersburg and Wrangell at an annual subsidy rate of $3,415,987, from May 1, 2011 through April 30, 2013.
    • Order 2013-2-10 (February 11, 2013): re-selecting Alaska Airlines, Inc., to provide Essential Air Service (EAS) at Cordova, Gustavus, and Yakutat, Alaska, for $4,827,052 annual subsidy and at Petersburg and Wrangell at an annual subsidy rate of $3,476,579, from May 1, 2013, through April 30, 2015.

External linksEdit