Megan Cavanagh (judge)

Megan Kathleen Cavanagh is an attorney who was elected in November 2018 to become an Associate Justice of the Michigan Supreme Court with a term beginning in January 2019.

Megan Cavanagh
Associate Justice of the Michigan Supreme Court
Assumed office
January 1, 2019
Preceded byKurtis T. Wilder
Personal details
Born
Megan Kathleen Cavanagh

1970/1971 (age 50–51)
Lansing, Michigan, U.S.
Political partyDemocratic
Children2
RelativesMichael Cavanagh (father)
EducationUniversity of Michigan (B.E.)
Wayne State University Law School (J.D.)

BiographyEdit

Cavanagh was born in Lansing, Michigan, and educated in the public schools. She was raised in a family immersed in state politics with Michael Cavanagh, her father, serving as Chief Justice of the Michigan Supreme Court from 1991 to 1995, and her uncle Jerome Cavanagh elected in the 1960s as Mayor of Detroit.[1][2]

She attended the University of Michigan, graduating in 1993 with a Bachelor of Engineering degree, and earned her Juris Doctor from the Wayne State University Law School in 2000.[3] After law school, she entered private practice and became a shareholder with Garan Lucow Miller P.C., where she specialized in appellate law.[4][5] She served as a member of the Michigan Attorney Grievance Commission.[6]

In the November 6, 2018 election Cavanagh won a seat when she received the second-most votes for the Supreme Court, receiving 25.2 percent of the vote, and unseating Kurtis T. Wilder who came in third.[7][8] The Democratic Party endorsed her candidacy.[9][10] She was the first person to join their parent as a member of the Michigan Supreme Court since 1857.[11]

Personal lifeEdit

Cavanagh lives in Birmingham, Michigan and has two daughters.[11][12]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Tribou, Doug (November 1, 2018). "Meet 2018 Michigan Supreme Court candidate Megan Cavanagh". MichiganRadio.org. National Public Radio. Retrieved December 2, 2018.
  2. ^ "Justice Beth Clement leading Supreme Court race". WILX.com. Associated Press. November 7, 2018. Retrieved December 2, 2018.
  3. ^ Mack, Julie (November 7, 2018). "Beth Clement, Megan Kathleen Cavanagh poised to win Michigan Supreme Court seats". Michigan Live. Retrieved December 2, 2018.
  4. ^ Eggert, David (November 15, 2012). "Can woman sue for mental anguish after oil company destroys her house? Michigan Supreme Court to decide". Michigan Live. Retrieved December 4, 2018.
  5. ^ Brand-Williams, Oralandar (October 30, 2018). "Well-financed foes give Michigan Supreme Court justices a fight". The Detroit News. Retrieved December 4, 2018.
  6. ^ "Commission Members". Attorney Grievance Commission, State of Michigan. Retrieved December 2, 2018.
  7. ^ Brand-Williams, Oralandar (November 6, 2018). "Justice Clement, challenger Cavanagh headed for election to State Supreme Court". The Detroit News. Retrieved December 2, 2018.
  8. ^ "Cavanagh wins Supreme Court race by very thin margin". The Oakland Press. Associated Press. November 8, 2018. Retrieved December 2, 2018.
  9. ^ Burgio, Alysia (April 15, 2018). "Democratic Party endorses candidates for several races at Detroit convention". WLNS.com. Retrieved December 2, 2018.
  10. ^ "Michigan Democrats make official their slate of candidates". ABC12.com. Associated Press. August 28, 2018. Retrieved December 2, 2018.
  11. ^ a b White, Ed (October 24, 2018). "Michigan Supreme Court race has 6 candidates for 2 seats". Petoskey News. Associated Press. Retrieved December 2, 2018.
  12. ^ "Megan Cavanagh". AnnArborVotes.org. Retrieved December 2, 2018.

External linksEdit

Legal offices
Preceded by Associate Justice of the Michigan Supreme Court
2019–present
Incumbent