Meeting of Waters

Coordinates: 3°8′12″S 59°54′17″W / 3.13667°S 59.90472°W / -3.13667; -59.90472

The Meeting of Waters (Portuguese: Encontro das Águas) is the confluence of two or more rivers. The expression generally refers to the largest of these phenomena on Earth: the meeting between the dark (blackwater) Rio Negro and the pale sandy-colored (whitewater) Amazon River, referred to as the Solimões River in Brazil upriver of this confluence. For 6 km (3.7 mi) the two rivers' waters run side by side without much mixing. It is one of the main tourist attractions of Manaus, Brazil.[1]

The Meeting of Waters is the confluence of two or more rivers. The expression generally refers to the larger of these events: the meeting between the dark Rio Negro with the sandy colored upper Amazon River, or Solimões, as it is known in Brazil.

This phenomenon is due to the differences in temperature, speed, and amount of dissolved sediments in the waters of the two rivers. The Rio Negro flows at near 2 km/h (1.2 mph) at a temperature of 28 °C (82 °F), while the Rio Solimões flows between 4 and 6 km/h (2.5–3.7 mph) at a temperature of 22 °C (72 °F).[1] The light-colored water is rich with sediment from the river bed since the Andes Mountains, whereas the black water, running from the Colombian hills and interior jungles, is nearly sediment-free and colored by decayed leaf and plant matter.[2]

Smaller-scale meeting of waters of the Amazon river also occurs in the locations of Santarém (Brazil) and Iquitos (Peru).

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b "Spectacular confluence of the Negro and Solimões rivers, whose waters are separated for several miles". Visit Brazil. Retrieved 2020-01-25.
  2. ^ "Meeting of the Waters". earthobservatory.nasa.gov. NASA. 7 September 2012. Retrieved 9 November 2020.

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