Mari-Luci Jaramillo

Mari-Luci Jaramillo (June 19, 1928 – November 20, 2019) served as a U.S. Ambassador to Honduras. In 1976, when Jaramillo was first appointed as U.S. ambassador, she became the first Mexican American woman to become a U.S. representative to a foreign country. While serving as ambassador, Jaramillo oversaw the Peace Corps program in Honduras.[1]

Jaramillo was native of Las Vegas, New Mexico. While attending school, she worked in her father’s shop, shining shoes. Later, she cleaned houses and waited tables in order to help pay for her tuition at New Mexico Highlands University. After graduation, she became an elementary school teacher. Later Jaramillo joined the faculty at the University of New Mexico (UNM) and served in various roles, including associate dean, vice president, and assistant to the president of the university.

On April Fool's Day, 1977, President Carter asked Jaramillo to become the United States Ambassador to Honduras. Initially suspecting the offer was a prank by her students, she accepted and served in the position for nearly three years.

Since her ambassadorship, Jaramillo has worked for Educational Testing Service and spent several years at The Pentagon during the Clinton administration. She has also served on the Board of Trustees of the Children's Television Workshop and the Diversity External Advisory Council of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Currently, Jaramillo is a member of the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials.

AwardsEdit

In 1973, Jaramillo was named Outstanding Chicana of the Year by McGraw-Hill publishers.

In 1977, Jaramillo was given the New Mexico Distinguished Service award by the New Mexico state legislature.

In 1980, after stepping down as ambassador Jaramillo was given honorary Honduran citizenship.

In 1985, the New Mexico Mortar Board Alumni Association named her Distinguished Woman of the Year.

In 1988, the magazine, Hispanic Business listed her as one of the 100 most influential Hispanics in the United States.

In 1989, the Association of Mexican American Educators gave her its award for Endless Efforts in Education.

In 1990, the Mexican American Women's National Association gave Jaramillo the Primera Award for being the first Latina to be named an ambassador.[2]

WorksEdit

  • Jaramiilo, Mari-Luci (1972). Cautions When Working with the Culturally Different Child. OCLC 95564950.
  • Jaramillo, Mari-Luci (2002). Madam Ambassador: The Shoemaker's Daughter. Tempe, Ariz.: Bilingual Press. ISBN 1-931010-04-8. OCLC 45917194.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ S., Meier, Matt (1997). Notable Latino Americans : a biographical dictionary. Franco Serri, Conchita., Garcia, Richard A., 1941-. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press. ISBN 058538908X. OCLC 49569798.
  2. ^ S., Meier, Matt (1997). Notable Latino Americans : a biographical dictionary. Franco Serri, Conchita., Garcia, Richard A., 1941-. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press. ISBN 058538908X. OCLC 49569798.
Diplomatic posts
Preceded by
Ralph E. Becker
United States Ambassador to Honduras
1977 – 1980
Succeeded by
Jack R. Binns