Scots Trad Music Awards

  (Redirected from MG Alba Scots Trad Music Awards)

The Scots Trad Music Awards or Na Trads were founded in 2003 by Simon Thoumire to celebrate Scotland's traditional music in all its forms and create a high profile opportunity to bring the music and music industry into the spotlight of media and public attention. Nominations are made by the public and in 2019 over 100,000 public votes were expected across 18 categories.[1]

Scots Trad Music Awards
Awarded forScottish traditional music
Sponsored byMG Alba
CountryScotland
Presented byHands Up for Trad
Hosted by
First awarded2003; 18 years ago (2003)
Television/radio coverage
NetworkBBC Alba

The awards are organised by Thoumire's organisation Hands Up for Trad. Since 2008 the awards have been sponsored by MG Alba, and the event has is televised on BBC Alba.

Since 2019 the ceremony has including the awarding of The Belhaven Bursary for Innovation in Scottish Music, sponsored by Belhaven Brewery. The prize consists of £25,000, an ale brewed with the winner's name on it, an appearance at an event at Tartan Week in New York and the use of the winner's music in an advertising campaign. The cash prize is the largest music prize in Scotland, matched only by the Mercury Prize.[2]

Award winnersEdit

2020Edit

The awards had been due to be staged in the Caird Hall Dundee, but were moved online due to the COVID-19 pandemic, and presented by Alistair Heather and Mary Ann Kennedy. The categories were also adapted for the circumstances.[3][4][5]

  • Album of The Year: The Woods by Hamish Napier
  • Original Work of the Year: Everyday Heroes by Skerryvore
  • Community Music Project of the Year: "Tunes in the Hoose"
  • Event of the Year Award: BBC Radio Scotland Young Traditional Musician Award 20th Anniversary Concert (Celtic Connections)
  • Gaelic Singer of the Year: Fionnag NicChoinnich (Fiona MacKenzie)
  • Musician of the Year: Tim Edey
  • Online Performance of 2020: Duncan Chisholm's Covid Ceilidh
  • Citty Finlayson Scots Singer of the Year: Siobhan Miller
  • Trad Video of the Year: Calum Dan’s Transit Van by Peat & Diesel
  • Trad Music in the Media: Anna MassieBlack Isle Correspondent
  • Up & Coming artist of the Year: Rebecca Hill
  • Music Tutor of the Year: Josie Duncan
  • Janet Paisley Services to Scots Language Award: James Robertson
  • Services to Gaelic Award: John Smith (BBC Television)
  • Hamish Henderson Award for Services to Traditional Music: Lisa Whytock

2019Edit

The awards were staged in Aberdeen[6]

2018Edit

The awards were staged in Perth and broadcast live on BBC Alba.[7]

  • Belhaven Bursary for Innovation in Scottish Music: Talisk
  • Album of the Year : Sandwood by Duncan Chisholm
  • Club of the Year: Partick Folk Club
  • Composer of the Year: Duncan Chisholm
  • Community Project of the Year: Care for a Ceilidh
  • Event of the Year: Far Far from Ypres
  • Gaelic Singer of the Year: Eilidh Cormack
  • Instrumentalist of the Year: Calum Stewart
  • Live Act of the Year: Elephant Sessions
  • Citty Finlayson Scots Singer of the Year: Iona Fyfe [sco; gd]
  • Scottish Dance Band of the Year: Susan MacFadyen
  • Scottish Folk Band of the Year: Dàimh
  • Scottish Pipe Band of the Year: Inveraray & District Pipe Band
  • Trad Music in the Media: Pipeline, BBC Radio Scotland
  • Music Tutor of the Year: Anna Wendy Stevenson
  • Up and Coming Artist of the Year: Assynt
  • Venue of the Year Award: Drygate Brewery, Glasgow
  • Services to Gaelic: Runrig
  • The Hamish Henderson Services to Traditional Music Award: Pete Shepheard
  • Services to Scots Language: Janet Paisley

2017Edit

The awards were staged at Lagoon Centre, Paisley and broadcast live on BBC Alba.[8]

2016Edit

The awards were staged at Caird Hall, Dundee and broadcast live on BBC Alba.[9]

  • Album of the Year: Astar by Breabach
  • Club of the Year: Stonehaven Folk Club
  • Composer of the Year: Kris Drever
  • Community Project of the Year: Feis Rois Life Long Learning Project
  • Event of the Year: Piping Live! Festival, Glasgow
  • Gaelic Singer of the Year: Ellen MacDonald
  • Instrumentalist of the Year: Rachel Newton
  • Live Act of the Year: Skerryvore
  • Citty Finlayson Scots Singer of the Year: Lori Watson
  • Scottish Dance Band of the Year: Trail West
  • Folk Band of the Year: Breabach
  • Scottish Pipe Band of the Year: North Lanarkshire Schools Pipe Band
  • Trad Music in the Media: BBC Radio Scotland's Take the Floor
  • Music Tutor of the Year: Jim Hunter
  • Up and Coming Artist of the Year: Ryan Young
  • Venue of the Year: The Glad Café, Glasgow

2015Edit

The awards were staged at Caird Hall, Dundee and broadcast live on BBC Alba.[10]

2014Edit

The awards were staged at the Inverness Leisure Centre and broadcast live on BBC Alba.[11]

  • Album of the Year: Live at Celtic Connections by Duncan Chisholm
  • Club of the Year: Tin Hut Sessions
  • Composer of the Year: Jim Sutherland
  • Community Project of the Year: Summer Isles Festival
  • Event of the Year: GRIT: The Martyn Bennett Story
  • Gaelic Singer of the Year: Mischa Macpherson
  • Instrumentalist of the Year: Catriona McKay
  • Live Act of the Year: Skipinnish
  • Citty Finlayson Scots Singer of the Year: Emily Smith
  • Scottish Dance Band of the Year: Da Fustra
  • Scottish Folk Band of the Year: Julie Fowlis
  • Pipe Band of the Year: West Lothian Schools pipe band
  • Trad Music in the Media: Isles FM
  • Music Tutor of the Year: Douglas Montgomery
  • Up and Coming Artist of the Year: The Elephant Sessions
  • Venue of the Year Award: The Ceilidh Place

2013Edit

The 2013 ceremony was held in Aberdeen.[12]

2012Edit

  • Album of the Year: Cille Bhrìde (Kilbride) by Kathleen MacInnes
  • Club of the Year: Falkirk Folk Club
  • Composer of the Year: Mike Vass
  • Community Project of the Year: Feis Rois Local and National Ceilidh Trail 2012
  • Event of the Year: Scots Fiddle Festival
  • Gaelic Singer of the Year: Riona Whyte
  • Instrumentalist of the Year: Duncan Chisholm
  • Live Act of the Year: Session A9
  • Citty Finlayson Scots Singer of the Year: Paul McKenna
  • Scottish Dance Band of the Year: Deoch 'n' Dorus
  • Scottish Folk Band of the Year: Breabach
  • Pipe Band of the Year: George Watson's College Pipes and Drums
  • Trad Music in the Media: Julie Fowlis for Brave
  • Music Tutor of the Year: Gillian Frame
  • Up and Coming Artist of the Year: Niteworks
  • Venue of the Year Award: Bogbain Farm, Inverness

2011Edit

The ceremony was held in the Perth Concert Hall.[13]

2010Edit

  • Album of the Year: Uam by Julie Fowlis
  • Club of the Year: Highland Club (Inverness)
  • Composer of the Year: Iain Morrison
  • Community Project of the Year: Orkney Traditional Music Project
  • Event of the Year: Shetland Folk Festival
  • Instrumentalist of the Year: Martin O'Neill
  • Live Act of the Year: Red Hot Chilli Pipers
  • Citty Finlayson Scots Singer of the Year: Joe Aitken
  • Gaelic Singer of the Year: Eilidh Mackenzie
  • Scottish Folk Band of the Year: Malinky
  • Scottish Pipe Band of the Year: Oban High School Pipe Band
  • Scottish Dance Band of the Year: Ian Muir Scottish Dance Band
  • Trad Music in the Media Award: Travelling Folk, BBC Radio Scotland
  • Music Tutor of the Year: Gordon Connell
  • Up and Coming Artist of the Year: Matheu Watson
  • Venue of the Year: Skipinnish Ceilidh House, Oban

2009Edit

2008Edit

2007Edit

2006Edit

  • Album of the Year: Heart of America by Donnie Munro
  • Club of the Year: Wick Accordion and Fiddle Club
  • Composer of the Year: Donald Shaw
  • Community Project of the Year: Fèisean nan Gàidheal
  • Event of the Year: World Pipe Band Championships
  • Gaelic Singer of the Year: Kathleen MacInnes
  • Instrumentalist of the Year: Aidan O’Rourke
  • Live Act of the Year: The McCalmans
  • Citty Finlayson Scots Singer of the Year: Sylvia Barnes
  • Scottish Dance Band of the Year: Marian Anderson Scottish Dance Band
  • Scottish Folk Band of the Year: Anna Massie Band
  • Scottish Pipe Band of the Year: Kintyre Schools Pipe Band
  • Services to Industry Award: Johnny Mowat
  • Strathspey and Reel Society of the Year: Banchory Strathspey and Reel Society
  • The McEwan's Sessions Venue of the Year: The Lismore, Glasgow
  • Up and Coming Artist of the Year: Jenna Cumming

2005Edit

  • Album of the Year: Magnificent Seven by Blazin' Fiddles
  • Club of the Year: Glenfarg Folk Club
  • Composer of the Year: Charlie McKerron
  • Community Project of the Year: Lochgoilhead Fiddle Workshop
  • Event of the Year: Blazin’ in Beauly
  • Gaelic Singer of the Year: Julie Fowlis
  • Instrumentalist of the Year: Aaron Jones
  • Live Act of the Year: Peatbog Faeries
  • Media Award: Aig Cridhe Ar Ciuil (At the Heart of our Music is Song)
  • Scots Singer of the Year: Jim Reid
  • Scottish Dance Band of the Year: Gordon Shand and his Scottish Dance Band
  • Scottish Folk Band of the Year: Back of the Moon
  • Scottish Pipe Band of the Year: The House of Edgar Shotts & Dykehead Pipe Band
  • Services to Industry Award: MusicScotland
  • The McEwan's Sessions Venue of the Year: Hootananny, Inverness
  • Up and Coming Artist of the Year: Jenna Reid

2004Edit

2003Edit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Voting open for the MG ALBA Scots Trad Music Awards 2019 nominations & Top 20 Albums Longlist, as the awards return to Aberdeen with a stellar line-up". TRACS. Retrieved 11 January 2020.
  2. ^ "Belhaven Bursary for Innovation Award 2019 shortlist announced". Medium. Retrieved 11 January 2020.
  3. ^ "Winners Announced for 2020 Scots Trad Music Awards". Journal of Music. 15 December 2020. Retrieved 15 December 2020.
  4. ^ Hutchison, Caitlin (13 December 2020). "NHS charity single among winners in Scots Trad Music Awards". The Herald. Retrieved 15 December 2020.
  5. ^ Cassidy, Jane (14 December 2020). "Scots trad music scene stars honoured at MG ALBA Awards". The National. Retrieved 15 December 2020.
  6. ^ "Winners of the MG ALBA Scots Trad Music Awards 2019". Folk Radio. Retrieved 10 January 2020.
  7. ^ "Winners Announced for MG ALBA Scots Trad Music Awards 2018". Hands Up for Trad. 2 December 2018. Retrieved 2 December 2018.
  8. ^ "TRAD TRIUMPH IN PAISLEY – WINNERS ARE ANNOUNCED FOR MG ALBA SCOTS TRAD MUSIC AWARDS 2017 – Scots Trad Music Awards". Hands Up for Trad. 3 December 2017. Retrieved 1 January 2018.
  9. ^ "MG Alba Scots Trad Music Awards 2016 – Live Review and Winners". Folk Radio UK. 6 December 2016. Retrieved 5 July 2017.
  10. ^ "MG Alba Scots Trad Music Awards – Live Review and Winners". Folk Radio UK. 7 December 2015. Retrieved 5 July 2016.
  11. ^ Ferguson, Brian (13 December 2014). "Trad Music Awards: Martyn Bennett Story victorious". The Scotsman. Retrieved 5 July 2016.
  12. ^ Ferguson, Brian (8 December 2013). "Donald Shaw honoured at Scots Trad Music Awards". The Scotsman. Retrieved 30 July 2016.
  13. ^ Adams, Rob (5 December 2011). "Scots Trad Music Awards, Perth Concert Hall". The Herald. Retrieved 30 July 2016.
  14. ^ Thoumire, Simon (4 December 2011). "Blog | Winners Announced At The Mg Alba Scots Trad Music Awards". Scottish Culture Online. Retrieved 23 February 2012.

External linksEdit