BBC Radio Scotland Young Traditional Musician

The BBC Radio Scotland Young Traditional Musician competition has run annually since 2001.[1] It exists to encourage young musicians to keep their tradition alive and to provide performance opportunities, tools and advice to help contestants make a career in traditional music.[2] Former winners include Hannah Rarity, Mohsen Amini, Robyn Stapleton, Shona Mooney and Emily Smith.[3]

BBC Radio Scotland Young Traditional Musician
Awarded forScottish folk music
Sponsored byBBC Radio Scotland
VenueGlasgow City Halls
CountryScotland
Presented byHands Up for Trad
Hosted by
First awarded2001
Last awarded2022
Currently held byEryn Rae
Websiteprojects.handsupfortrad.scot/youngtrad/
Television/radio coverage
Network

CompetitionEdit

The competition was started in 2000 by Simon Thoumire, together with fiddler Clare McLaughlin and Elspeth Cowie, national organiser of the Traditional Music and Song Association of Scotland (TMSA), and was first awarded at the 2001 Celtic Connections festival.[4]BBC Radio Scotland started to support the award the following year, and has continued to do so. The award is organised and run by Hands Up for Trad on behalf of BBC Radio Scotland.[1][5]

The usual format of the award is a residential weekend in October at Wiston Lodge, South Lanarkshire for twelve semi-finalists. From there, six are selected to go on to a final concert, where the winner is chosen by a panel of judges.[2]

Since 2007, the final concert has been held in Glasgow City Halls on the last day of the Celtic Connections festival, and broadcast live on BBC Radio Scotland.[6] Between 2012 and 2015 the final concert was also televised on BBC Alba.[7] The presenter was initially Mary Ann Kennedy, replaced in 2016 by Bruce MacGregor. From 2020 the final concert was again televised on BBC Alba with Joy Dunlop giving Gaelic commentary alongside MacGregor.

The semi-finals of the 2021 competition took place in October 2020 during the COVID-19 pandemic. Instead of the Wiston Lodge weekend, the entrants performed in the foyer of the BBC Pacific Quay building, with no audience.[5][8]

The eligibility criteria are that the contestant is aged between 16 and 27, and is normally resident in Scotland or has lived in Scotland for five years.[9] This age range is more extended than the similarly titled BBC Radio 2 Young Folk Award. That award is open to all United Kingdom residents, but its age range is just 16 to 21.[10] Hence the contestants for the Scottish award are usually more advanced musicians, often students or graduates of one of the degrees in traditional music such as the Royal Conservatoire of Scotland's BMus with Honours (Traditional music), and already established in a professional career in music.

While the BBC Radio 2 Young Folk Award uses the umbrella term "folk", the BBC Radio Scotland Young Traditional Musician award is specifically for a Scottish musician performing the music of their own tradition, though not necessarily Scottish traditional music.[11]

The TMSA Young Trad Tour is an annual tour of Scotland by the finalists and the previous year's winner, organised by the Traditional Music and Song Association of Scotland, and supported by Creative Scotland. The destinations include the Celtic Connections festival and the hometowns of each of the finalists. The musicians also make an album together.[12]

Award winners and nomineesEdit

Winners are listed first and marked with a blue riband ( ).

Year   Name Hometown Instrument Higher music education
2022[13][14]   Eryn Rae Scottish Borders fiddle Royal Conservatoire of Scotland
  Breanna Wilson Glasgow fiddle Royal Conservatoire of Scotland
  Malachy Arnold Glasgow clarsach Royal Conservatoire of Scotland[15]
  Saffron Hanvidge Inverness Gaelic song Sabhal Mòr Ostaig
  Malin Lewis Skye pipes Royal Conservatoire of Scotland
  Sophie Joint Glasgow piano Royal Conservatoire of Scotland
2021[16][3]   Michael Biggins Newcastle upon Tyne piano Royal Conservatoire of Scotland
  Lucie Hendry Aberdeenshire lever harp Royal Conservatoire of Scotland
  Iona Fyfe Huntly voice Royal Conservatoire of Scotland
  Graham Rorie Orkney fiddle Royal Conservatoire of Scotland
  Ellie Beaton Rothienorman voice Aberdeen City Music School
  Bradley Parker County Down bagpipes Royal Conservatoire of Scotland
2020[17][18][19][3]   Ali Levack Dingwall whistles, pipes Royal Conservatoire of Scotland
  Calum McIlroy Aberdeenshire guitar, mandolin, voice Royal Conservatoire of Scotland
  Mhairi Mackinnon Perthshire fiddle Royal Conservatoire of Scotland[20]
  Cameron Nixon Aberdeenshire Scots song Royal Conservatoire of Scotland
  Josie Duncan Lewis Gaelic song Royal Conservatoire of Scotland
  Padruig Morrison Uist accordion Edinburgh University and Maynooth University[21]
2019[22][23][24][3]   Benedict Morris Glasgow fiddle Royal Conservatoire of Scotland
  Luc McNally Dipton, County Durham guitar, voice Royal Conservatoire of Scotland[25]
  Cameron Ross Stonehaven fiddle Royal Conservatoire of Scotland
  Ross Miller Linlithgow bagpipes Royal Conservatoire of Scotland
  Catherine Tinney Skye Gaelic song
  Sarah Markey Coatbridge flute
2018[26][27][3]   Hannah Rarity West Lothian Scots song Royal Conservatoire of Scotland
  David Shedden Glasgow bagpipes Royal Conservatoire of Scotland
  Amy Papiransky Keith, Moray Scots song University of Aberdeen and Royal Conservatoire of Scotland
  Rory Matheson Drumbeg, Sutherland piano Royal Conservatoire of Scotland
  Ali Levack Maryburgh, Ross-shire whistles, pipes Royal Conservatoire of Scotland
  Luc McNally [a] Dipton, County Durham guitar, voice Royal Conservatoire of Scotland[25]
2017[28][29][30][3]   Charlie Stewart Glenfarg fiddle Royal Conservatoire of Scotland
  Grant McFarlane Paisley accordion Royal Conservatoire of Scotland
  Iona Fyfe Huntly Scots song Royal Conservatoire of Scotland
  Dougie McCance Erskine bagpipes University of the Highlands and Islands
  Ella Munro Skye Scots song Royal Conservatoire of Scotland
  Kim Carnie Oban Gaelic song
2016[31][32][3]   Mohsen Amini Glasgow concertina
  Hannah Macrae Lochaber fiddle Royal Conservatoire of Scotland
  Jessica Burton Orkney clarsach Royal Conservatoire of Scotland
  Murray Willis Lismore accordion Benbecula College
  Robbie Greig Edinburgh fiddle Benbecula College[33]
  Ryan Young Cardross fiddle Royal Conservatoire of Scotland
2015[34][3]   Claire Hastings Dumfries song Royal Conservatoire of Scotland
  Ainsley Hamill Cardross song Royal Conservatoire of Scotland
  Gemma Donald Shetland fiddle
  Heather Downie Dunblane clarsach
  Ryan Young Cardross fiddle Royal Conservatoire of Scotland
  Séamus Ó Baoighill Skye fiddle
2014[35][3]   Robyn Stapleton Stranraer voice Royal Conservatoire of Scotland
  Alistair Iain Paterson Bishopton piano Royal Conservatoire of Scotland
  Ian Smith Tiree accordion Royal Conservatoire of Scotland
  Jack Badcock Edinburgh guitar, song
  Mhairi Marwick Fochabers fiddle Strathclyde University
  Neil Ewart Kilchoan fiddle Strathclyde University
2013[36][7][3]   Paddy Callaghan Glasgow accordion
  Andrew Dunlop Connel piano Royal Northern College of Music and Eastman School of Music
  Graham Mackenzie Inverness fiddle Royal Northern College of Music
  Grant MacFarlane Paisley accordion Royal Conservatoire of Scotland
  Hannah Fisher Dunkeld fiddle
  Scott Wood Erskine pipes, whistle Royal Conservatoire of Scotland
2012[37][38][3]   Rona Wilkie Oban fiddle
  Kirsty Watt Lewis Gaelic song
  Katie Boyle Glasgow fiddle Irish World Academy of Music and Dance
  Catriona Price Orkney fiddle Royal Northern College of Music and Royal Academy of Music
  Roisin Anne Hughes Glasgow fiddle
  Alistair Ogilvy Strathblane Scots song
2011[39][3]   Kristan Harvey Orkney fiddle Royal Conservatoire of Scotland[40]
  Alistair Ogilvy Strathblane song
  Andrew Waite Duns accordion
  Lorne MacDougall Carradale pipes Royal Scottish Academy of Music and Drama[41]
  Mairi Chaimbeul Skye Gaelic song and clarsach Berklee College of Music[42]
  Tina Rees Glasgow piano
2010[43][3]   Daniel Thorpe Inverurie fiddle Royal Conservatoire of Scotland[44]
  Paddy Callaghan Glasgow accordion, harp
  Mairi Chaimbeul Skye harp Berklee College of Music[42]
  Lorne MacDougall Carradale pipes Royal Scottish Academy of Music and Drama[41]
  Hannah Phillips Glasgow harp Royal Conservatoire of Scotland[45]
  Kyle Warren Helensburgh pipes Royal Conservatoire of Scotland[46]
2009[47][48][3]   Ruairidh MacMillan Nairn fiddle Royal Scottish Academy of Music and Drama
  Adam Holmes Edinburgh guitar
  Lorne MacDougall Carradale pipes, whistle Royal Scottish Academy of Music and Drama[41]
  Kenneth Nicolson Lewis Gaelic song
  Jack Smedley Buckie fiddle
  Daniel Thorpe Inverurie fiddle Royal Conservatoire of Scotland[44]
2008[49][3]   Ewan Robertson Carrbridge guitar, voice
  Steven Blake Livingstone pipes, whistle Royal Conservatoire of Scotland[50]
  Amy Lord Dunblane Scots song Royal Conservatoire of Scotland[51]
  James Duncan MacKenzie Isle of Lewis pipes, smallpipes, flute, whistles
  Robert Menzies Dumfries accordion, piano
  Ailie Robertson Edinburgh clarsach
2007[52][6][53][54][3]   Catriona Watt Lewis Gaelic Royal Scottish Academy of Music and Drama[55]
  Darren MacLean Isle of Skye Gaelic song Royal Scottish Academy of Music and Drama[56]
  Mike Vass Nairn fiddle
  Calum Stewart Garmouth wooden flute
  Calum MacCrimmon Monifieth pipes, whistles
  Martin Hunter Glasgow accordion
2006[57][58][3]   Shona Mooney Borders fiddle Newcastle University[59]
  Kirsty Cotter Glasgow fiddle
  Christopher Keatinge Melrose accordion
  Darren MacLean Skye Gaelic song Royal Scottish Academy of Music and Drama[56]
  Hamish Napier Grantown on Spey flute, piano, Scots song Berklee College of Music[60]
  Fraser Shaw Islay pipes, whistle Sabhal Mòr Ostaig[61]
2005[62][3]   Stuart Cassells Falkirk bagpipes Royal Scottish Academy of Music and Drama[63]
  Rachel Newton Edinburgh clarsarch, song
  Mike Vass Nairn fiddle
  Darren Maclean Skye song Royal Scottish Academy of Music and Drama[56]
  Sarah Naylor Skye fiddle Strathclyde University[64]
  Maeve Mackinnon Glasgow song Royal Scottish Academy of Music and Drama and Sabhal Mòr Ostaig[65]
2004[66][67][3]   James Graham Lochinver Gaelic song Royal Scottish Academy of Music and Drama
  Shona Donaldson Huntly voice, fiddle
  Rosie Morton Edinburgh clarsach, voice Royal Scottish Academy of Music and Drama
  Sarah Naylor Skye fiddle, voice Strathclyde University
  Tom Orr Lanark accordion
  Jenna Reid Shetland fiddle, piano, voice Royal Scottish Academy of Music and Drama
2003[68][3]   Anna Massie Fortrose fiddle, guitar Strathclyde University[66]
  Shona Donaldson Huntly song
  Sarah-Jane Fifield Inverness fiddle
  Mark Laurenson Shetland fiddle
  Kevin O'Neill Glasgow flute
  Lori Watson Borders fiddle, voice Royal Scottish Academy of Music and Drama[69]
2002[70][3]   Emily Smith Dumfries and Galloway Scots song Royal Scottish Academy of Music and Drama
  Ruaridh Campbell Aberfoyle fiddle Strathclyde University[71]
  Jennifer Port Golspie harp Royal Scottish Academy of Music and Drama[72]
  Findlay Napier Grantown on Spey voice, guitar Royal Scottish Academy of Music and Drama[73]
  Lori Watson Borders fiddle Royal Scottish Academy of Music and Drama[69]
  Ross Ainslie Bridge of Earn smallpipes, whistle, Highland pipes
2001[74][75][76][3]   Gillian Frame Arran fiddle Royal Conservatoire of Scotland
  Patsy Reid Perthshire fiddle Royal Northern College of Music[77]
  Kevin O'Neill Glasgow flute
  Mairearad Green Achiltibuie pipes, accordion
  Steve Byrne Arbroath Scots song
  Celine Donoghue Glasgow banjo Royal Scottish Academy of Music and Drama[78]

See alsoEdit

NotesEdit

  1. ^ Unable to perform due to injury.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b "Young Trad Musicians". Hands Up for Trad. Retrieved 20 October 2020.
  2. ^ a b "About the BBC Radio Scotland Young Traditional Musician Award". Hands Up for Trad. Retrieved 20 October 2020.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v "Young Trad Musicians: Previous winners". Hands Up for Trad. Retrieved 31 January 2021.
  4. ^ Gilchrist, Jim (10 January 2001). "A reel reward". The Scotsman. Edinburgh. p. 15. ProQuest 326874111. Retrieved 12 January 2021.
  5. ^ a b "BBC Radio Scotland Young Traditional Musician". BBC. Retrieved 1 January 2021.
  6. ^ a b "BBC Radio Scotland Young Traditional Musician of the Year 2007 announced". Hands Up for Trad. Archived from the original on 19 May 2007. Retrieved 25 October 2020.
  7. ^ a b "BBC ALBA to broadcast BBC Radio Scotland Young Traditional Musician of the Year final 2013". Allmedia Scotland. 30 January 2013. Retrieved 27 October 2020.
  8. ^ The BBC Radio Scotland Young Traditional Musician of the Year 2021 Semi Finals (Radio broadcast). Travelling Folk. Introduced by Anna Massie. BBC Radio Scotland. 15 October 2020.{{cite AV media}}: CS1 maint: others in cite AV media (notes) (link)
  9. ^ "Competition Rules". BBC. Retrieved 20 October 2020.
  10. ^ "Radio 2's Young Folk Award 2019 – Terms and Conditions". BBC. Retrieved 20 October 2020.
  11. ^ "What is a Scottish traditional musician?". Hands Up for Trad. 2013. Retrieved 26 October 2020.
  12. ^ "TMSA Young Trad Tour". Traditional Music and Song Association of Scotland. Retrieved 2 December 2020.
  13. ^ "BBC Radio Scotland Young Traditional Musician: 2022 finalists". BBC. Retrieved 16 December 2021.
  14. ^ "Fiddle player Eryn Rae wins BBC Radio Scotland Young Traditional Musician 2022". Hands Up for Trad. Retrieved 7 February 2022.
  15. ^ O'Hanlon, Hannah (7 May 2021). "Musician's moving tribute to 'mentor' Robert Black". Campbeltown Courier. Retrieved 13 January 2022.
  16. ^ "BBC Radio Scotland Young Traditional Musician: 2021 finalists". BBC. Retrieved 22 October 2020.
  17. ^ Wyllie, James (2 February 2020). "Dingwall piper named BBC Radio Scotland's young traditional musician of the year". The Press and Journal (Scotland). Retrieved 20 October 2020.
  18. ^ Jobson, Jonny (6 February 2020). "Dingwall's Ali Levack on overnight success – 10 years in the making". The National (Scotland). Retrieved 20 October 2020.
  19. ^ "Ali Levack wins BBC Radio Scotland Young Traditional Musician 2020". BBC. 3 February 2020. Retrieved 25 October 2020.
  20. ^ "Horsecross Sessions". Small City Big Personality. 19 October 2014. Retrieved 28 January 2021.
  21. ^ "Pàdruig Morrison". New Music Scotland. Retrieved 28 January 2021.
  22. ^ Tonner, Judith (4 February 2020). "Airdrie man marks 'amazing' time as young traditional musician of the year". Daily Record (Scotland). Retrieved 20 October 2020.
  23. ^ "Fiddle player wins young traditional musician award". BBC News. 28 January 2019. Retrieved 25 October 2020.
  24. ^ "BBC Radio Scotland Young Traditional Musician of the Year 2019 Finalists Announced". BBC. Retrieved 28 January 2021.
  25. ^ a b "About". Luc McNally. Retrieved 28 January 2021.
  26. ^ Clark, John-Paul (1 August 2019). "Hannah returns for Linlithgow concert". Daily Record (Scotland). Retrieved 20 October 2020.
  27. ^ "Singer Hannah Rarity wins BBC Radio Scotland Young Traditional Musician 2018". BBC. 29 January 2018. Retrieved 25 October 2020.
  28. ^ Bonn, Melanie (7 February 2017). "Glenfarg fiddler named Young Trad Musician of the Year 2017". Daily Record (Scotland). Retrieved 20 October 2020.
  29. ^ Greenaway, Heather (30 January 2017). "Rising stars of folk music, battling for Celtic crown, on how they found their passion". Daily Record (Scotland). Retrieved 20 October 2020.
  30. ^ "Charlie Stewart named young traditional musician 2017". BBC News. 6 February 2017. Retrieved 25 October 2020.
  31. ^ Greenaway, Heather (14 February 2006). "Young Scot Awards 2016: Celtic music superstardom? Easy squeezy says talented concertina player". Daily Record (Scotland). Retrieved 20 October 2020.
  32. ^ "BBC Radio Scotland Young Traditional Musician 2016". BBC. Retrieved 28 January 2021.
  33. ^ "About". Robbie Greig Fiddle. Retrieved 28 January 2021.
  34. ^ Thomson, Lorna (4 February 2015). "Dumfries singer Claire Hastings 'still in shock' after winning the BBC Alba Young Traditional Musician of the Year award". Daily Record (Scotland). Retrieved 20 October 2020.
  35. ^ "BBC Radio Scotland Young Traditional Musician Award finalists announced". Hands Up for Trad. October 2013. Retrieved 26 October 2020.
  36. ^ "BBC Radio Scotland Young Traditional Musician of the Year Final 2013". Hands Up for Trad. Retrieved 26 October 2020.
  37. ^ "BBC Radio Scotland Young Traditional Musician 2012". Hands Up for Trad. 2011. Archived from the original on 15 February 2012. Retrieved 26 October 2020.
  38. ^ "BBC Radio Scotland Young Traditional Musician 2012". BBC. Retrieved 29 January 2021.
  39. ^ "BBC Radio Scotland Young Traditional Musician of the Year 2011 announced". Hands Up for Trad. 2011. Archived from the original on 18 January 2012. Retrieved 26 October 2020.
  40. ^ "Bio". Kristan Harvey. Retrieved 31 January 2021.
  41. ^ a b c "Lorne MacDougall Hello World". Celtic Music Radio. Retrieved 31 January 2021.
  42. ^ a b "About". Mairi Chaimbeul. Retrieved 31 January 2021.
  43. ^ "Daniel Thorpe wins BBC Radio Scotland Young Traditional Musician Award 2010". Hands Up for Trad. Archived from the original on 3 June 2010. Retrieved 26 October 2020.
  44. ^ a b "Daniel Thorpe". Glasgow Folk-Music Workshop. Retrieved 31 January 2021.
  45. ^ "Hannah Phillips - Harpist". Hire A Band. Retrieved 31 January 2021.
  46. ^ "About". Kyle Warren Bagpipes. Retrieved 31 January 2021.
  47. ^ "BBC Radio Scotland Young Traditional Musician 2009". Hands Up for Trad. Archived from the original on 10 December 2008. Retrieved 25 October 2020.
  48. ^ "Fiddler is young traditional musician of year". The Herald. 2 February 2009. Retrieved 31 January 2021.
  49. ^ "Young Talent Heralds Traditional Music". Hands Up for Trad. 28 January 2008. Archived from the original on 18 February 2012. Retrieved 26 October 2020.
  50. ^ "About". Steven Blake Music. Retrieved 31 January 2021.
  51. ^ "About". Amy Lord. Retrieved 31 January 2021.
  52. ^ "Future glittering stars of traditional music win through to prestigious final". Hands Up for Trad. 10 October 2006. Archived from the original on 15 January 2007. Retrieved 26 October 2020.
  53. ^ "Gaelic singer scoops BBC honour". BBC News. 30 January 2007. Retrieved 25 October 2020.
  54. ^ "Radio Scotland Young Traditional Musician Of The Year 2007 announced". BBC. 29 January 2007. Retrieved 25 October 2020.
  55. ^ Buchanan, John D. "Catriona Watt". AllMusic. Retrieved 31 January 2021.
  56. ^ a b c "Tutor Focus: Darren MacLean, Tutor of Gaelic Song" (PDF). Fèisean nan Gàidheal. Retrieved 31 January 2021.
  57. ^ Szymborski, Susan (29 September 2006). "YOUNG TRAD TOUR 2006". HI-ARTS. Archived from the original on 17 May 2008. Retrieved 25 October 2020.
  58. ^ "Young Traditional Musician Finalists 2006". Hands Up for Trad. October 2005. Archived from the original on 25 February 2012. Retrieved 26 October 2020.
  59. ^ "Shona Mooney". Scottish Folk Music. Retrieved 31 January 2021.
  60. ^ "Biog". Hamish Napier. Retrieved 31 January 2021.
  61. ^ McFadyen, Neil (26 September 2017). "MAC ÌLE – THE MUSIC OF FRASER SHAW". Folk Radio. Retrieved 31 January 2021.
  62. ^ "Young Scots bagpiper blasts his way to prestigious piping prize". Hands Up for Trad. 24 January 2005. Archived from the original on 9 May 2008. Retrieved 25 October 2020.
  63. ^ "Stuart Cassells". AllMusic. Retrieved 31 January 2021.
  64. ^ "Sarah Naylor". Fiddle Folk. Retrieved 31 January 2021.
  65. ^ "About". Maeve Mackinnon. Retrieved 31 January 2021.
  66. ^ a b Celtic Connections Brochure 2004 (PDF). Glasgow Life. 2004. Archived from the original (PDF) on 7 December 2003. Retrieved 1 December 2020.
  67. ^ "BBC Radio Scotland Young Traditional Musician 2004". Hands Up for Trad. Archived from the original on 5 June 2010. Retrieved 25 October 2020.
  68. ^ "Folk and world music listings". The List. No. 459. 16 January 2003. p. 53. Retrieved 26 October 2020.
  69. ^ a b "Info". Lori Watson. Retrieved 31 January 2021.
  70. ^ "BBC Radio Scotland Young Traditional Musician 2002". The Herald. 28 January 2002. Retrieved 26 October 2020.
  71. ^ "Ruaridh Campbell Biography". All Celtic Music. Retrieved 31 January 2021.
  72. ^ "Biography". Jennifer Port. Retrieved 31 January 2021.
  73. ^ "Biography". Findlay Napier. Retrieved 31 January 2021.
  74. ^ Adams, Rob (15 January 2001). "Celtic Connections Chris Stout, Glasgow Royal Concert Hall". The Herald. Glasgow. p. 15. ProQuest 332912339. Retrieved 6 January 2021.
  75. ^ Armstrong, Gary (2 February 2020). "Pollokshields musician reflects on career two decades after winning first BBC Young Trad award". Glasgow Live. Retrieved 20 October 2020.
  76. ^ "The very first Young Trad Award". Hands Up for Trad. 2013. Retrieved 26 October 2020.
  77. ^ "Fiddle with Patsy Reid". Sabhal Mor Ostaig. Retrieved 31 January 2021.
  78. ^ "Celine Donoghue". Glasgow Folk-Music Workshop. Retrieved 31 January 2021.

External linksEdit