Los Angeles Times Syndicate

The Los Angeles Times Syndicate was a print syndication service that operated from c, 1949 to 2000. Owned by the Times Mirror Company, it also operated the Los Angeles Times Syndicate International; together the two divisions sold more than 140 features in more than 100 countries around the world. Syndicated features included Pulitzer Prize-winning commentators and columnists, full news and feature services, editorial cartoons and comic strips, online products and photo and graphics packages.

Los Angeles Times Syndicate
FormerlyMirror Enterprises Syndicate (late 1940s–early 1960s)
Los Angeles Times Mirror Syndicate
TypeSyndication
IndustryMedia
Foundedc. 1949; 72 years ago (1949)
Defunct2000; 21 years ago (2000)
Fatemerged into Tribune Media Services
Headquarters,
Area served
United States
Key people
Rex Barley (manager), Richard S. Newcombe (VP and GM, 1978–1984), J. Willard Colston (President)[1]
Servicescolumns, news and feature services, editorial cartoons and comic strips, online products
OwnerTimes Mirror Company
ParentLos Angeles Times
DivisionsGeneral Features Corp. (1967–1974)

HistoryEdit

The syndicate was founded in c. 1949 by the Times Mirror Company as the Mirror Enterprises Syndicate. In the early 1960s the name was changed to the Los Angeles Times Syndicate, and was operated as a department of the Los Angeles Times newspaper. Rex Barley was manager of the syndicate from 1950 until at least 1968.[2]

The syndicate acquired the New York City-based independent syndicate General Features Corp. in 1967 for approximately $1 million, retaining it as a separate entity.[2] In 1974, the L.A. Times Syndicate absorbed General Features into its own operations.

In mid-1987, the Los Angeles Times Syndicate was the fifth-ranked syndication service, with 85 features.[3]

In 2000, upon completion of the merger with the Tribune Company,[4] it became a division of Tribune Media Services.

The New York office closed June 1, 2000, while the Salt Lake City office closed on August 31, 2000. International work continues to be done in Los Angeles through the Tribune Content Agency. Several of the employees were offered follow on jobs with Tribune Media Services after the closing.[5]

Comic strips and panelsEdit

Neither iteration of the syndicate ever produced a breakout comic strip; the most successful strips — Luther, Napoleon and Uncle Elby, Mr. Tweedy — tended to be inherited from other syndicates. Most Mirror Enterprise strips didn't last more than two or three years, and the company appeared to give up on syndicating comic strips after circa 1961.

After a five-year hiatus, the newly named Los Angeles Times Syndicate picked up the distribution of comic strips again in 1965. It had a similar lack of long-term success, with most strips not lasting more than three of four year in syndication. The most popular strips that originated with the L.A. Times Syndicate were Ed Nofziger's Animalogic (11 years in syndication) and Lee Nordling's Sherman on the Mount (9 years).

The syndicate also distributed Lou Grant's editorial cartoons from the 1950s through the 1980s.

Mirror Enterprises Syndicate (c. 1949–c. 1961)Edit

Los Angeles Times Syndicate (1965–2000)Edit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b "LATS to Release Bruce Lee Strip," The Comics Journal #73 (July 1982), p. 13.
  2. ^ a b "Times Mirror Company And General Features," New York Times (January 4, 1967), p. 84.
  3. ^ Katina Alexander (June 14, 1987). "A Superhero For Cartoonists?". New York Times. p. 34. Retrieved August 18, 2012.
  4. ^ Barringer, Felicity; Holson, Laura M. (2000-03-14). "MULTIMEDIA DEAL: THE DEAL; Tribune Company Agrees to Buy Times Mirror". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2016-02-21.
  5. ^ Astor, Dave (2002). "Tms to Shut Two Offices". Editor & Publisher. 135: 10.
  6. ^ a b "Bill Ziegler," Who's Who of American Comic Books: 1928–1999. Accessed Nov. 30, 2017.
  7. ^ "Mel Keefer," Who's Who of American Comic Books: 1928–1999. Accessed Nov. 30, 2017.
  8. ^ "Dan Spiegle," Who's Who of American Comic Books: 1928–1999. Accessed Nov. 30, 2017.
  9. ^ "Eisenhower Story Strip From Mirror Syndicate," Editor & Publisher (May 10, 1952). Archived at Stripper's Guide.
  10. ^ a b "Stan Lee," Who's Who of American Comic Books: 1928–1999. Accessed Nov. 30, 2017.
  11. ^ "'Irma', Radio-Movie Star, Goes Newspaper," Editor & Publisher (July 29, 1950). Archived at Stripper's Guide.
  12. ^ "Dan De Carlo 1," Who's Who of American Comic Books: 1928–1999. Accessed Nov. 30, 2017.
  13. ^ Wells, John; Dallas, Keith (February 26, 2013). American Comic Book Chronicles: 1960-64. TwoMorrows Publishing. p. 9. ISBN 978-1-60549-045-8.
  14. ^ a b Knoll, Erwin. "Napoleon" Strip Moves To Mirror Syndicate," Editor & Publisher (September 20, 1952). Archived at Stripper's Guide. Accessed Oct. 31, 2018.
  15. ^ "Roger Armstrong," Who's Who of American Comic Books: 1928–1999. Accessed Nov. 30, 2017.
  16. ^ "Joe Messerli," Who's Who of American Comic Books: 1928–1999. Accessed Nov. 30, 2017.
  17. ^ "Kay Wright," Who's Who of American Comic Books: 1928–1999. Accessed Nov. 30, 2017.
  18. ^ Holtz, Allan. "Obscruity of the Day: Soapy Waters," Stripper's Guide (January 10, 2007).
  19. ^ Holtz, Allan. "Obscurity of the Day: Times Have Changed," Stripper's Guide (Dec. 3, 2008).
  20. ^ "Ed Nofziger," Who's Who of American Comic Books: 1928–1999. Accessed Nov. 30, 2017.
  21. ^ "Jim Lawrence," Who's Who of American Comic Books: 1928–1999. Accessed Nov. 30, 2017.
  22. ^ "Paul Chadwick," Who's Who of American Comic Books: 1928–1999. Accessed Nov. 30, 2017.
  23. ^ "Ron Harris," Who's Who of American Comic Books: 1928–1999. Accessed Nov. 30, 2017.
  24. ^ "Deryl Skelton," Who's Who of American Comic Books: 1928–1999. Accessed Nov. 30, 2017.
  25. ^ "Pete Hoffman," Who's Who of American Comic Books: 1928–1999. Accessed Nov. 30, 2017.
  26. ^ Jeff Cobb at Don Markstein's Toonopedia. Archived from the original on October 8, 2016.
  27. ^ "Sharman Di Vono," Who's Who of American Comic Books: 1928–1999. Accessed Nov. 30, 2017.
  28. ^ "Fran Matera," Who's Who of American Comic Books: 1928–1999. Accessed Nov. 30, 2017.
  29. ^ Horn, Maurice, ed. (1996). 100 Years of American Newspaper Comics. New York York: Gramercy Books. pp. 190–191. ISBN 0-517-12447-5.
  30. ^ "'Coloring Outside the Lines: Black Cartoonists as Social Commentators' exhibit to open at Laney". Oakland Local. August 6, 2010. Archived from the original on August 23, 2010. Retrieved February 23, 2014.
  31. ^ Foran, Chris. "GREEN SHEET|THROWBACK THURSDAY: COMICS EDITION: 'Mr. Tweedy,' the Green Sheet's long-running lovable loser," Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel (March 23, 2016).
  32. ^ "Enric Badia Romero," Who's Who of American Comic Books: 1928–1999. Accessed Nov. 30, 2017.
  33. ^ "Lee Nordling," Who's Who of American Comic Books: 1928–1999. Accessed Nov. 30, 2017.
  34. ^ "Los Angeles Times Syndicate Star Trek newspaper comic strip". Retrieved 2006-12-25.
  35. ^ "I Love Comix Archive: Los Angeles Times Syndicate Star Trek newspaper comic strip". Retrieved 2010-04-30.
  36. ^ "John Buscema," Who's Who of American Comic Books: 1928–1999. Accessed Nov. 30, 2017.
  37. ^ "Frank Springer," Who's Who of American Comic Books: 1928–1999. Accessed Nov. 30, 2017.
  38. ^ "Neal Sternecky," Who's Who of American Comic Books: 1928–1999. Accessed Nov. 30, 2017.