Longus capitis muscle

The longus capitis muscle (Latin for long muscle of the head, alternatively rectus capitis anticus major), is broad and thick above, narrow below, and arises by four tendinous slips, from the anterior tubercles of the transverse processes of the third, fourth, fifth, and sixth cervical vertebræ, and ascends, converging toward its fellow of the opposite side, to be inserted into the inferior surface of the basilar part of the occipital bone.

Longus capitis muscle
Longus capitis.png
The anterior vertebral muscles.
Details
Originanterior tubercles of the transverse processes of the third, fourth, fifth, and sixth cervical vertebræ
Insertionbasilar part of the occipital bone
NerveC1-C3/C4
Actionsflexion of neck at atlanto-occipital joint
Identifiers
Latinmusculus longus capitis
TA98A04.2.01.003
TA22149
FMA46308
Anatomical terms of muscle

It is innervated by a branch of cervical plexus.

Longus capitis has several actions:

acting unilaterally, to:

  • flex the head and neck laterally
  • rotate the head ipsilaterally

acting bilaterally:

  • flex the head and neck[1]

Additional imagesEdit

ReferencesEdit

  This article incorporates text in the public domain from page 395 of the 20th edition of Gray's Anatomy (1918)

  1. ^ "Longus capitis muscle (Anatomy) - General Practice Notebook".

External linksEdit