List of rain deities

There are many different gods of rain in different religions:

Aztec god Tlaloc, Millan Primary School in Mexico City

AfricanEdit

African mythologyEdit

AmericanEdit

MesoamericaEdit

North AmericaEdit

South AmericaEdit

AsianEdit

Filipino mythologiesEdit

  • Oden (Bugkalot mythology): deity of the rain, worshiped for its life-giving waters[6]
  • Apo Tudo (Ilocano mythology): the deity of the rain[7]
  • Anitun Tauo (Sambal mythology): the goddess of win and rain who was reduced in rank by Malayari for her conceit[8]
  • Anitun Tabu (Tagalog mythology): goddess of wind and rain and daughter of Idianale and Dumangan[9]
  • Bulan-hari (Tagalog mythology): one of the deities sent by Bathala to aid the people of Pinak; can command rain to fall; married to Bitu-in[10]
  • Santonilyo (Bisaya mythology): a deity who brings rain when its image is immersed at sea[11]
  • Diwata Kat Sidpan (Tagbanwa mythology): a deity who lives in the western region called Sidpan;[12] controls the rains[13]
  • Diwata Kat Libatan (Tagbanwa mythology): a deity who lives in the eastern region called Babatan;[14] controls the rain[15]
  • Diwata na Magbabaya (Bukidnon mythology): simply referred as Magbabaya; the good supreme deity and supreme planner who looks like a man; created the earth and the first eight elements, namely bronze, gold, coins, rock, clouds, rain, iron, and water; using the elements, he also created the sea, sky, moon, and stars; also known as the pure god who wills all things; one of three deities living in the realm called Banting[16]
  • Tagbanua (Manobo mythology): the god of rain[17]
  • Pamulak Manobo (Bagobo mythology): supreme deity and creator of the world, including the land, sea, and the first humans; throws water from the sky, causing rain, while his spit are the showers;[18] controls good harvest, rain, wind, life, and death; in some myths, the chief deity is simply referred as the male deity, Diwata[19]

Hindu mythologyEdit

ShintoEdit

Middle Eastern mythologyEdit

Tibetan mythologyEdit

EuropeanEdit

Greek mythologyEdit

  • Hyades, nymphs that bring rain
  • Zeus, god of rain, thunder, and lightning

Lithuanian mythologyEdit

  • Blizgulis, god of snow

Norse MythologyEdit

  • Freyr, Norse god of rain, sunshine, summer and fertility

Slavic mythologyEdit

  • Dodola, goddess of rain
  • Dudumitsa, Bulgarian goddess of rain

OceanianEdit

Hawaiian mythologyEdit

Australian Aboriginal DreamingEdit

NotesEdit

  1. ^ McVeigh, Malcolm J. (1974). God in Africa: Conceptions of God in African Traditional Religion and Christianity. C. Stark. p. 14. ISBN 9780890070031.
  2. ^ Noticia del Dia (in Spanish)
  3. ^ Miller & Taube 1993, 2003, p.64.
  4. ^ Terraciano, Kevin (2001). The Mixtecs of colonial Oaxaca: Ñudzahui history, sixteenth through eighteenth centuries. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press. ISBN 0-8047-3756-8. OCLC 45861953.
  5. ^ Monaghan, Patricia (2009). Encyclopedia of Goddesses and Heroines [2 volumes]. ABC-CLIO. p. 139. ISBN 978-0-313-34990-4.
  6. ^ Wilson, L. L. (1947). Ilongot Life and Legends. Southeast Asia Institute.
  7. ^ Llamzon, Teodoro A. 1978. Handbook of Philippine language groups. Quezon City, Philippines: Ateneo de Manila University Press.
  8. ^ Jocano, F. L. (1969). Philippine Mythology. Quezon City: Capitol Publishing House Inc.
  9. ^ Jocano, F. L. (1969). Philippine Mythology. Quezon City: Capitol Publishing House Inc.
  10. ^ Eugenio, D. L. (2013). Philippine Folk Literature: The Legends. Quezon City: University of the Philippines Press
  11. ^ San Agustín, G. (1998). Conquistas de las Islas Filipinas, 1565–1615 (Spanish Edition): Bilingual ed edition. San Agustin Museum.
  12. ^ Filipino Heritage: The metal age in the Philippines (1977). Manila: Lahing Pilipino Pub.
  13. ^ Fox, R. B. (1982). Religion and Society Among the Tagbanuas of Palawan Island, Philippines. Manila: National Museum.
  14. ^ Filipino Heritage: The metal age in the Philippines (1977). Manila: Lahing Pilipino Pub.
  15. ^ Fox, R. B. (1982). Religion and Society Among the Tagbanuas of Palawan Island, Philippines. Manila: National Museum.
  16. ^ Unabia, C. C. (1986). THe Bukidnon Batbatonon and Pamuhay: A Socio-Literary Study. Quezon City : UP Press.
  17. ^ Jocano, F. L. (1969). Philippine Mythology. Quezon City: Capitol Publishing House Inc.
  18. ^ Benedict, L. W. (1913). Bagobo Myths. Journal of American Folklore, pp. 26 (99): 13–63.
  19. ^ Jocano, F. L. (1969). Philippine Mythology. Quezon City: Capitol Publishing House Inc.
  20. ^ Thompson, Hunter (1979). The Great Shark Hunt: Strange Tales from a Strange Time, 1st ed., Summit Books, 105-109. ISBN 0-671-40046-0.