List of foreign satellites launched by India

This is a list of all the foreign satellites launched by India. India has launched 342 satellites for 36 different countries as of 28 February 2021.[1] As of 2019, the Indian Space Research Organisation, India's government space agency, is the only launch-capable agency in India, and launches all research and commercial projects.

Commercial launches for foreign nations are negotiated through NSIL (formerly through Antrix), the ISRO's commercial arm. Between 2013 and 2015, India launched 28 foreign satellites for nine different countries earning a total revenue of US$101 million.[2]

As of 2021, the Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle has been the only launch vehicle utilized in international commercial launches. The newly operational GSLV Mk II and GSLV Mk III have yet to receive commercial orders, and the first international commercial launch of the Small Satellite Launch Vehicle is due for 2020.

On February 15, 2017, ISRO launched 104 satellites on single launch by a PSLV-XL. 96 of them were from the United States, while the others were from Israel, the UAE, Kazakhstan, the Netherlands, Belgium and Germany.[3] It was the largest number of satellites launched on a single flight by any space agency (with the previous record held by Russia's Dnepr launcher, which launched 37 in June 2014)[4] until 24 January 2021, when SpaceX launched the Transporter-1 mission on a Falcon 9 rocket carrying 143 satellites into orbit.[5]

1990sEdit

No. Satellite Country Launch date Launch mass Launch vehicle Remarks
1 Taai

M

an

  Germany 26 May 1999 45 kg PSLV-C2 ISRO's 1st commercial launch with foreign satellites as payload. India's Oceansat-1 was also launched. This was PSLV's 3rd launch overall.
2 Kitsat-3   South Korea 110 kg

2000sEdit

No. Satellite Country Launch date Launch mass Launch vehicle Remarks
3 BIRD   Germany 22 October 2001 92 kg PSLV-C3 ISRO's 2nd commercial launch.
4 PROBA   Belgium 94 kg
5 Lapan-TUBsat   Indonesia 10 January 2007 56 kg PSLV-C7
6 Pehuensat-1   Argentina 6 kg
7 AGILE   Italy 23 April 2007 352 kg PSLV-C8 PSLV's 11th flight.
8 TecSAR   Israel 21 January 2008 295 kg PSLV-C10 PSLV's 12th launch.
9 CAN-X2   Canada 28 April 2008 3.5 kg PSLV-C9 ISRO launched 10 satellites, of which 8 were foreign.[6]
10 NLS-5 6.5 kg
11 Delfi-C3   Netherlands 2.2 kg
12 AAUSAT-II   Denmark 0.75 kg
13 COMPASS-1   Germany 1 kg
14 Rubin-8 8 kg
15 CUTE-1.7   Japan 3 kg
16 SEEDS-2 1 kg
17 UWE-2   Germany 23 September 2009 1 kg PSLV-C14 ISRO launched 7 satellites, of which 6 were foreign.[7]
18 BeeSat-1 1 kg
19 RUBIN-9.1 8 kg
20 RUBIN-9.2 8 kg
21 ITUpSAT1   Turkey 1 kg
22 SwissCube-1    Switzerland 1 kg

2010sEdit

No. Satellite Country Launch date Launch mass Launch vehicle Remarks
23 Alsat-2A   Algeria 12 July 2010 116 kg PSLV-C15 ISRO launched 5 satellites, of which 3 were foreign.[8]
24 AISSat-1   Norway 6.5 kg
25 TIsat-1    Switzerland 1 kg
26 VESSELSAT-1   Luxembourg 12 January 2011 28.7 kg PSLV-C18 ISRO launched 4 satellites, of which 1 was foreign.[9]
27 X-SAT   Singapore 20 April 2011 106 kg PSLV-C16 ISRO launched 3 satellites, of which 1 was foreign.[10]
28 SPOT-6   France 9 September 2012 712 kg PSLV-C21 PSLV's 22nd flight.
29 PROITERES   Japan 15 kg
30 Sapphire   Canada 25 February 2013 148 kg PSLV-C20 ISRO launched 7 satellites, of which 6 were foreign.[11]
31 NEOSSat 74 kg
32 TUGSAT-1   Austria 14 kg each
33 UniBRITE-1
34 AAUSAT3   Denmark 3 kg
35 STRaND-1   United Kingdom 6.5 kg
36 SPOT-7   France 30 June 2014 714 kg PSLV-C23 PSLV's 10th flight in 'core-alone' configuration (i.e. without the use of solid strap-on motors).
37 AISAT   Germany 14 kg
38 CanX-4   Canada 15 kg each
39 CanX-5
40 VELOX-1   Singapore 7 kg
41 UK-DMC 3A   United Kingdom 10 July 2015 447 kg PSLV-XL C28[12] India's first exclusive foreign satellites launch, all the 5 payloads were from   United Kingdom. At the time it was the heaviest commercial mission (1439 kg) successfully accomplished using a launch vehicle assembled by ISRO.
42 UK-DMC 3B 447 kg
43 UK-DMC 3C 447 kg
44 CBNT-1 91 kg
45 De-OrbitSail 7 kg
46 LAPAN-A2   Indonesia 28 September 2015 76 kg PSLV-C30 Commercial satellites from   United States were launched on an Indian rocket for the first time. Astrosat, India's first dedicated astronomy satellite, was also launched on this flight.[13]
47 NLS-14 (Ev9)   Canada 14 kg
48 Lemur-2-Peter   United States 28 kg together
49 Lemur-2-Jeroen
50 Lemur-2-Joel
51 Lemur-2-Chris
52 TeLEOS-1   Singapore 16 December 2015 400 kg PSLV-C29 Exclusive commercial launch of 6 Singaporean satellites.
53 VELOX-C1 123 kg
54 VELOX-II 13 kg
55 Athenoxat-1 <5 kg
56 Kent Ridge 1 (KR 1) 78 kg
57 Galassia 3.4 kg
58 LAPAN A3   Indonesia 22 June 2016 120 kg PSLV-XL C34 ISRO launched 20 satellites (including 3 Indian satellites) aboard PSLV-C34, the highest number of satellites that the agency has launched aboard a single flight.[14][15]
59 BIROS   Germany 130 kg
60 M3MSat   Canada 85 kg
61 GHGsat-D 25.5 kg
62 SkySat Gen2-1   United States 110 kg
63-74 12 x Dove (satellite) 4.7 kg each
75 AlSAT-1N   Algeria 26 September 2016 7 kg PSLV-G C35 ISRO launches 8 satellites in its 15th flight of the 'XL' version of the PSLV - 5 foreign satellites and 3 Indian satellites (SCATSAT-1, PRATHAM and PISAT).[16]
76 Alsat-1B 103 kg
77 Alsat-2B 117 kg
78 NLS-19   Canada 8 kg
79 Pathfinder-1   United States 44 kg
80-167 88 x Flock-3p   United States 15 February 2017 4.7 kg each PSLV-XL 37 ISRO launched 104 satellites, of which 3 were Indian satellites. It was[17] the largest number of satellites launched on a single flight by any space agency.[18]
168-175 8 x Lemur-2 4.6 kg each
176 Al Farabi-1   Kazakhstan 1.7 kg
177 BGUSAT   Israel 4.3 kg
178 Nayif-1   United Arab Emirates 1.1 kg
179 DIDO-2   Israel
   Switzerland
4.2 kg
180 PEASS   Belgium
  Germany
  Israel
  Netherlands
3 kg
181 Pegasus   Austria 23 June 2017 2 kg PSLV-C38 ISRO launched 31 satellites, of which 29 were foreign.[19]
182 NUDTSat   China[20] 2 kg
183 SUCHAI-1   Chile 1 kg
184 VZLUSAT-1   Czech Republic 2 kg
185 Aalto-1   Finland 3.9 kg
186 ROBUSTA-1B   France 1 kg
187 COMPASS-2/Dragsail   Germany 4 kg
188 URSAMAIOR   Italy 3 kg
189 D-SAT 4.5 kg
190 Max Valier   Italy

  Germany

15 kg
191 CE-SAT1   Japan 60 kg
192 Venta-1   Latvia 7.5 kg
193 LituanicaSAT-2   Lithuania 4 kg
194 skCUBE   Slovakia 1 kg
195 InflateSail   United Kingdom 3.2 kg
196 UCLSat 2 kg
197-199 3 x Diamond Satellites 18 kg
200 CICERO-6   United States 1.2 kg
201-208 8 x Lemur-2 4 kg each
209 Tyvak-53b ?
210 Telesat Phase-1 LEO   Canada 12 January 2018 168 kg PSLV-XL C40 ISRO Launched 31 satellites, of which 28 were foreign.[21]
211 POC-1   Finland ?
212 PicSat   France 3.5 kg
213 CBNT-2   United Kingdom 42.7 kg
214 CANYVAL-X   South Korea 4 kg
215 CNUSAIL-1 4 kg
216 KAUSAT-5 3.2 kg
217 SIGMA 3.8 kg
218 STEP CUBE LAB 1 kg
219-222 4 x Flock-3p   United States 4.7 kg each
223-226 4 x Lemur-2 4 kg each
227-230 4 x SpaceBEE 1 kg each
231 DemoSat-2 ?
232 Micromas-2 3.8 kg
233 Tyvak-61C ?
234 Fox-1D 1.5 kg
235 Corvus BC3 10 kg
236 Arkyd-6 10 kg
237 CICERO-7 10 kg
238 NovaSAR   United Kingdom 16 September 2018 445 kg PSLV-CA C42 Exclusive commercial launch of two foreign satellites belonged to Surrey Satellite Technologies Ltd (SSTL),   United Kingdom. The satellites were put into sun-synchronous orbit under a commercial arrangement with Antrix Corp Ltd, the commercial arm of the ISRO.
239 S1-4 444 kg
240 Centauri -1   Australia 29 November 2018 10 kg PSLV-CA C43 -
241 Kepler (CASE)   Canada <15 kg
242 FACSAT-1   Colombia 4 kg
243 Reaktor Hello World   Finland <1 kg
244 InnoSAT-2   Malaysia 4 kg
245 HIBER-1   Netherlands ?
246 3Cat-1   Spain 1.2 kg
247 CICERO-8   United States 10 kg
248-263 FLOCK 3R 4 kg
264 Global -1 56 kg
265 HSAT-1 13 kg
266-269 4 x Lemur-2 4 kg each
270 Bluewalker 1   Lithuania 1 April 2019 10 kg PSLV-QL C45
271 M6P 6.8 kg
272 Aistechsat-3   Spain 2.3 kg
273 Astrocasr-2    Switzerland 3.8 kg
274-293 20 x Flock 4a (Doves)   United States 5.7 kg each
294-297 4 x Lemur-2 5.2 kg each
298 Meshbed   United States 27 November 2019 03:58 UTC 4.5 kg PSLV-XL C47
299-310 12 x Flock 4p (Super Doves) ?
311 Izanagi (QPS-SAR)   Japan 11 December 2019, 09:55 UTC ~100 kg PSLV-QL C48
312 Duchifat-3   Israel 2.3 kg
313 1HOPSAT   United States 22 kg
314-317 4 x Lemur-2 ?
318 Tyvak-0129 (PTD 1) 11 kg
319 Tyvak-0092 (COMMTRAIL)   Italy ?

2020sEdit

No. Satellite Country Launch date Launch mass Launch vehicle Remarks
320 R2   Lithuania 7 November 2020, 09:41 UTC - PSLV-DL C49 Technology demonstration satellite.
321-324 Kleos
(KSM-1A, 1B, 1C and 1D)
  Luxembourg - For maritime applications.
325-328 Lemur-1, 2, 3 and 4   United States - Remote sensing applications
329 Amazônia-1   Brazil 28 February 2021, 04:54 UTC 637 kg PSLV-DL C51 First Earth observation satellite entirely developed by Brazil.
330-341 12 x SpaceBEE   United States 12 x 4 kg
342 SAI-1 Nanoconnect-2   United States/  Mexico -

Satellites launched from India by countryEdit

Data as of 28 February 2021, * indicates inclusion of satellites developed in international collaboration by particular country
No. Country Total Number of Satellites
1   United States 249*
2   United Kingdom 14
3   Germany 13*
3   Canada 13
5   Singapore 8
6   South Korea 6
7   Israel 5*
7   Italy 5
7   Japan 5
7   Luxembourg 5
11   Belgium 4*
11    Switzerland 4*
11   Algeria 4
11   Lithuania 4
15   Netherlands 3*
15   Austria 3
15   Finland 3
15   France 3
15   Indonesia 3
20   Denmark 2
21   Argentina 1
21   Australia 1
21   Brazil 1
21   Chile 1
21   Colombia 1
21   Czech Republic 1
21   China 1
21   Kazakhstan 1
21   Latvia 1
21   Malaysia 1
21   Mexico 1*
21   Norway 1
21   Slovakia 1
21   Spain 1
21   Turkey 1
21   United Arab Emirates 1
Total 36 countries 342 satellites

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "International Customer Satellites Launched". www.antrix.gov.in. Archived from the original on 25 April 2016. Retrieved 25 April 2016.
  2. ^ "India says PSLV launches generated $601 million in commercial launch fees 2013-2015 - SpaceNews.com". SpaceNews.com. 30 March 2016. Retrieved 25 April 2016.
  3. ^ "ISRO Launches PSLV-C37 Rocket: Here's the List of 104 Satellites on Board". NDTV Gadgets360. Retrieved 15 February 2017.
  4. ^ "ISRO launches 104 satellites in one go, creates history". The Hindu. 15 February 2017. Retrieved 15 February 2017.
  5. ^ Wattles, Jackie. "SpaceX launches 143 satellites on one rocket in record-setting mission". CNN. Retrieved 24 January 2021.
  6. ^ "PSLV Successfully Launches Ten Satellites - ISRO". www.isro.gov.in. Retrieved 15 August 2018.
  7. ^ "PSLV-C14 Successfully Launches Oceansat-2 Satellite - ISRO". www.isro.gov.in. Retrieved 15 August 2018.
  8. ^ "PSLV-C15/CARTOSAT-2B - ISRO". www.isro.gov.in. Retrieved 15 August 2018.
  9. ^ Subramanian, T. s (12 October 2011). "PSLV-C18 puts four satellites in orbit". The Hindu. ISSN 0971-751X. Retrieved 15 August 2018.
  10. ^ "PSLV-C16/RESOURCESAT-2 - ISRO". www.isro.gov.in. Retrieved 15 August 2018.
  11. ^ "PSLV-C20 - ISRO". www.isro.gov.in. Retrieved 15 August 2018.
  12. ^ Jesudasan, Dennis S. "PSLV C-28 launches five UK satellites". The Hindu. Retrieved 15 March 2017.
  13. ^ Krishnan, Raghu (26 September 2015). "US start-up Spire to ride on Indian rocket to space with Astrosat". Business Standard India.
  14. ^ "ISRO sets record with 20 satellites launched at once: All you need to know". The Indian Express. 22 June 2016. Retrieved 22 June 2016.
  15. ^ "Full coverage: ISRO's 20-satellite launch, its largest ever, successful". The Indian Express. 22 June 2016. Retrieved 22 June 2016.
  16. ^ "PSLV-C35 / SCATSAT-1 Brochure - ISRO". www.isro.gov.in. Retrieved 26 September 2016.
  17. ^ "KickSat 1, 2". space.skyrocket.de. Retrieved 11 May 2020.
  18. ^ "PSLV-C37 Successfully Launches 104 Satellites in a Single Flight - ISRO". www.isro.gov.in. Retrieved 15 August 2018.
  19. ^ "PSLV-C38 Successfully Launches 31 Satellites in a Single Flight - ISRO". www.isro.gov.in. Retrieved 15 August 2018.
  20. ^ "NUDTSat (QB50 CN06)". Grunter's Space Page. Retrieved 19 January 2020.
  21. ^ Edmond, Deepu Sebastian (12 January 2018). "ISRO workhorse PSLV-C40 puts 31 satellites in space". The Hindu. ISSN 0971-751X. Retrieved 15 August 2018.

External linksEdit