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List of aces of aces

Ace of aces is a title accorded to the top active ace within a branch of service in a nation's military in time of war.[citation needed] The title is most closely associated with fighter aces, though there are other types, such as tank aces and submarine aces.[citation needed]

Contents

Fighter acesEdit

Ace of aces is a title accorded to the top flying ace/fighter ace of a nation's air force during time of war.[citation needed]

Persons accorded the title Ace of aces
Person Country of service War Time
Adolphe Pégoud   Third Republic (France) World War I 28 April 1915 – 31 August 1915 The first flying ace in aerial warfare history.[1][note 1]
Jean Navarre   Third Republic (France) World War I – 17 June 1916 Wounded in action on 17 June 1916.[2][better source needed][note 2]
Georges Guynemer   Third Republic (France) World War I – 11 September 1917 [2][better source needed][3][better source needed][note 3]
Charles Nungesser   Third Republic (France) World War I 11 September 1917 – Succeeded Guynemer on his death.[3][better source needed]
René Fonck   Third Republic (France) World War I – end of World War I All-time Allied Ace of Aces, with 75 confirmed aerial victories.[4][page needed][5][6][page needed][better source needed]
Max Immelmann   Imperial Germany World War I – 18 June 1916 Before his death, Boelcke and Immelmann swapped the title several times.[7][better source needed][note 4]
Oswald Boelcke   Imperial Germany World War I 18 June 1916 – 28 October 1916 Before the death of Immelmann, Boelcke and Immelmann swapped the title several times. Succeeded Immelmann on his death.[8][better source needed][note 5]
Erich Loewenhardt   Imperial Germany World War I – 10 August 1918 [9][page needed]
Ernst Udet   Imperial Germany World War I – end of World War I [10][page needed][better source needed]
Manfred von Richthofen   Imperial Germany World War I 26 April 1916 – 21 April 1918 One of the most widely recognised fighter aces of all time, Richthofen, also called "The Red Baron", achieved at least 80 air combat victories during his active flying career.[11]
Raoul Lufbery   United States
(  Escadrille Lafayette)
World War I October 1916 – 15 May 1918 [12][better source needed][13][page needed]
Paul Frank Baer   United States
(  Escadrille Lafayette)
World War I 15 May 1918 – 18 May 1918 Succeeded Lufbery on his death.[12][better source needed]
Frank Bayliss   United States
(  L'armee de l'air de France)
World War I 18 May 1918 – 12 June 1918 Succeeded Baer on his death.[12][better source needed]
David E. Putnam   United States
(  Escadrille Lafayette)
World War I 12 June 1918 – 12 September 1918 Succeeded Bayliss on his capture.[12][better source needed]
Eddie Rickenbacker   United States World War I 29 September 1918 – end of World War I Succeeded Luke on his death. Was the US ace of aces for overall aerial victories[12][better source needed]
Indra Lal Roy   United Kingdom World War I 1917–1918 India's most successful fighter pilot, with 12 kills (2 shared). He remains the only Indian fighter ace to this day.[14]
Richard Bong   United States World War II 1941–1945 World War II top flying ace, credited with 40 confirmed downed Japanese aircraft. Awarded Medal of Honor.[15]
Ivan Kozhedub   Soviet Union World War II 26 March 1943 – 16 April 1945 Credited with 64 victories, Kozhedub is the top scoring Allied ace of World War II. One of the few pilots to shoot down Messerschmitt Me 262.[16][17]
William R. Dunn   United States
(  Eagle Squadron)
World War II August 1941 – [18][page needed]
Joe Foss   United States World War II 1942–1944 Credited with 26 confirmed downed Japanese aircraft. Awarded Congressional Medal of Honor.[19][better source needed]
Werner Mölders   Third Reich (Germany) World War II – 22 November 1941 [20]
Erich Hartmann   Third Reich (Germany) World War II – end of World War II Hartmann is the highest scoring ace, with 352 aerial victories, the first pilot to achieve 300 aerial victories (on 24 August 1944) and first to achieve 350 aerial victories (on 17 April 1945)[21]
Alfred Schreiber   Third Reich (Germany) World War II 28 October 1944 First jet ace in aviation history[22]
James Jabara   United States Korean War 20 May 1951 – First American Jet ace for Jet-vs-Jet combat.[23][better source needed]
George A. Davis   United States Korean War – Friday 13 March 1953 Was the ace of aces for Jet-vs-Jet combat.[24][better source needed][25][better source needed]
Royal N. Baker   United States Korean War Friday 13 March 1953 – Was the ace of aces for Jet-vs-Jet combat. Succeeded Davis on his death.[24][better source needed][26][better source needed]
Joseph C. McConnell   United States Korean War – end of Korean War Was the ace of aces for Jet-vs-Jet combat.[27][better source needed]
Giora Even Epstein   Israel Six-Day War – Tuesday 6 June 1967 A retired colonel in the Israeli Air Force (IAF) and a fighter ace credited with 17 victories, 16 against Egyptian jets, making Epstein the ace of aces of supersonic fighter jets and of the Israeli Air Force.[28][29]
Randy H. Cunningham   United States Vietnam War 1968 – 1972 First American ace of the Vietnam War.[30]
Nguyen Van Coc Democratic Republic of Vietnam Vietnam War 1967-1969 [31]

[32]

Shahram Rostami   Iran Iran–Iraq War 1980–1988 [33][34][35]
Jalil Zandi   Iran Iran–Iraq War 1980–1988 Iran's most successful fighter pilot ever, with eight aerial victories. The most successful F-14 Tomcat pilot.[36][37][better source needed][38]
Mohommed "Sky Falcon" Rayyan   Iraq Iran–Iraq War 1980–1986 Iraq's most successful fighter pilot ever, with 5 confirmed aerial victories. The most successful MiG-25 pilot.[39][40]

Submarine acesEdit

Ace of the Deep is a title accorded[according to whom?] to the top subsea ace/undersea ace/submarine ace of a nation's submarine force during time of war.[citation needed]

Persons accorded the title ace of aces
Person Country of service War Time
Lothar von Arnauld de la Periere   Imperial Germany World War I 1915–18 The commander of U-35, de la Periere sank a total of 194 merchant vessels and gunboats totaling 453,716 gross metric tons.[41][page needed]
Dick O'Kane   United States World War II – 25 October 1944 Was captured and made Prisoner of war.[42][page needed]
Eugene Fluckey   United States World War II [43][better source needed]
Malcolm David Wanklyn   United Kingdom World War II – 14 April 1942 Wanklyn was the British Ace of Aces in terms of tonnage.[43][44][better source needed][45][page needed]
Benjamin Bryant   United Kingdom World War II – end of World War II Bryant was the British Ace of Aces.[46][47][page needed]
Reinhard Suhren   Third Reich (Germany) World War II A U-boat ace.[48][page needed]
Gianfranco Gazzana-Priaroggia   Italy World War II The highest scoring Italian submarine commander, with 11 ships sunk for a total of 90,601 tons.[49]
Carlo Fecia di Cossato   Italy World War II With 16 sinkings, he is credited with the most kills in the Regia Marina, as well as the second most successful Italian submarine commander with 86,545 tons.[49]

Submarine huntersEdit

Persons accorded[according to whom?] the title ace of aces[citation needed]
Person Country of service War Time
John Walker   United Kingdom World War II Walker sank more U-boats (12 Confirmed) during the Battle of the Atlantic than any other British or Allied commander.[50][better source needed]

FootnotesEdit

  1. ^ Victory crediting systems ranged from meticulous to non-existent during World War I. Also, the fact that the definition of an ace as one having scored five aerial victories did not come into usage until 1918. In other words, this portion of the list is purest nonsense.
  2. ^ Victory crediting systems ranged from meticulous to non-existent during World War I. Also, the fact that the definition of an ace as one having scored five aerial victories did not come into usage until 1918. In other words, this portion of the list is purest nonsense.
  3. ^ Victory crediting systems ranged from meticulous to non-existent during World War I. Also, the fact that the definition of an ace as one having scored five aerial victories did not come into usage until 1918. In other words, this portion of the list is purest nonsense.
  4. ^ Victory crediting systems ranged from meticulous to non-existent during World War I. Also, the fact that the definition of an ace as one having scored five aerial victories did not come into usage until 1918. In other words, this portion of the list is purest nonsense.
  5. ^ Victory crediting systems ranged from meticulous to non-existent during World War I. Also, the fact that the definition of an ace as one having scored five aerial victories did not come into usage until 1918. In other words, this portion of the list is purest nonsense.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Aviation History, "World's First Ace", Jon Guttman, Volume 20, Number 3, January 2010, pp.19
  2. ^ a b New York Times, "Saw 40 Air Foes After Guynemer", Thursday 27 September 1917
  3. ^ a b Wright-Martin Aircraft Corporation, "Hispano-Suiza Aeronautical Engines", Wright-Martin Aircraft Corporation, 1918
  4. ^ Taylor & Francis, "The European Powers in the First World War", Spencer Tucker, Laura Matysek Wood, Justin D. Murphy, ISBN 0-8153-0399-8
  5. ^ The Lowell Sun, "Record by French "Ace Of Aces" Never Equalled", Associated Press, Friday 21 June 1918
  6. ^ Doubleday, "Ace of Aces", René Fonck, 1967
  7. ^ New York Times, "Immelmann Fell 6,000 Feet To Death", 25 June 1916
  8. ^ New York Times, "A Talk With Boelcke On The Day Of His Death", Sunday 28 January 1917
  9. ^ Osprey Publishing, "Richthofen's Circus", Greg VanWyngarden, 2005
  10. ^ University of Nebraska Press, "Impossible missions?: German economic, military, and humanitarian efforts in Africa", Nina Berman, 2004
  11. ^ Kilduff, p. 6.
  12. ^ a b c d e Stokes, "Fighting the Flying Circus", Eddie Rickenbacker, 1919, (accessed 18 April 2009)
  13. ^ Osprey Publishing, "American Aces of World War I", Norman Franks, 2001, ISBN 1-84176-375-6
  14. ^ http://www.theaerodrome.com/aces/india/roy.php
  15. ^ "Dick Bong: Ace Of Aces", General George C. Kenney, 1960
  16. ^ Polak, Tomas with Christopher Shores. Stalin’s Falcon – The Aces of the Red Star. Brub Street, London, 1999. ISBN 1-902304-01-2, p.189
  17. ^ Николай Бодрихин. Советские асы. Очерки о советских летчиках
  18. ^ "Fighter Pilot: The First American Ace of World War II", William R. Dunn
  19. ^ The Telegraph (London), "Joe Foss", 2 January 2003, (accessed 17 April 2009)
  20. ^ Toliver & Constable 1998, p. 385.
  21. ^ Toliver & Constable 1998, pp. 385, 386.
  22. ^ Foreman & Harvey 1995, p. 81.
  23. ^ National Museum of the USAF, "LT. COL. JAMES JABARA" Archived 2012-10-10 at the Wayback Machine., (accessed 17 April 2009)
  24. ^ a b TIME, "Ace of Aces", Monday 23 March 1953, (accessed 17 April 2009)
  25. ^ TIME, "Fallen Ace", Monday 18 February 1952, (accessed 17 April 2009)
  26. ^ The Canberra Times, "Air Ace Ends Task", 16 March 1953, (accessed 17 April 2009)
  27. ^ TIME, "Ace's End", 6 September 1954, (accessed 17 April 2009)
  28. ^ "Desert Aces". Dogfights. Season 2. Episode 5. 2007-08-10. The History Channel. Archived from the original on 2007-10-10.
  29. ^ "CBSi". findarticles.com. Retrieved 6 May 2018.
  30. ^ Texas A&M University Press, "Striving for air superiority: the Tactical Air Command in Vietnam", Craig C. Hannah, 2002, ISBN 978-1-58544-146-4
  31. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2013-02-09. Retrieved 2013-07-31.
  32. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2013-03-04. Retrieved 2013-07-31.
  33. ^ http://www.acig.org/artman/publish/article_210.shtml
  34. ^ http://www.acig.org/artman/publish/article_211.shtml
  35. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2013-10-17. Retrieved 2015-04-16.
  36. ^ Iranian F-14 Tomcat Units in Combat by Tom Cooper & Farzad Bishop, 2004, Osprey Publishing, pp. 23–24
  37. ^ Imperial Iranian Air Force: Samurai in the skies
  38. ^ "Fire in the Hills: Iranian and Iraqi Battles of Autumn 1982, by Tom Cooper & Farzad Bishop, Sept. 9, 2003". Archived from the original on 2014-08-22. Retrieved 2013-07-27.
  39. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2013-08-05. Retrieved 2013-07-27.
  40. ^ Arab MiG-19 and MiG-21 Units in Combat, by David Nicolle and Tom Cooper, (2004) Osprey Publishing, p.82
  41. ^ Challenge Publications, "The U-Boat ACE of ACES", William H Langenberg, 2004
  42. ^ Sutton Publishing, "The Bravest Man", William Tuohy, 2001
  43. ^ a b The Times (London), "Rear-Admiral Eugene Fluckey", 20 July 2007 (accessed 2009 April 20)
  44. ^ Helgason, Guðmundur. "Malcolm David Wanklyn VC, DSO, RN". German U-boats of WWII - uboat.net.
  45. ^ Naval Institute Press, "Soldiers Lost at Sea", James E. Wise, Scott Baron, 2003, ISBN 978-1-59114-966-8
  46. ^ Helgason, Guðmundur. "Benjamin Bryant DSO, DSC, RN". German U-boats of WWII - uboat.net.
  47. ^ Bantam, "Submarine Commander", Rear Admiral Ben Bryant, 1960
  48. ^ US Naval Institute Press, "Teddy Suhren: Ace of Aces: Memoirs of a U-boat Rebel", Teddy Suhren, ISBN 978-1-59114-851-7
  49. ^ a b Giorgerini, Giorgio (2002). Uomini sul fondo : storia del sommergibilismo italiano dalle origini a oggi. Milano: Mondadori. p. 691. ISBN 8804505370.
  50. ^ http://www.unithistories.com/officers/RN_officersW.html#Walker_FJ

BibliographyEdit