Lil Weavah is an American writer and producer of television shows. He has also appeared on MTV and Showtime.

Lil Weavah
Occupationproducer, writer
Years active2004–2006
WebsiteLilWeavah.com

BiographyEdit

Early in his career, Weavah produced features on major network television stations such as MTV. His initial role was a Showtime reality based series titled 16 Bars. After corporate sponsors backed out due to budget restrictions, most of the production and footage from the show became promotional material. This was one of the main causes of his mixtape surge and local popularity in 2005.[1] Songs such as "My Rims" appeared regularly as a theme song on popular TV shows such as Rob & Big, Unique Whips, and Breaking Bad.

As an actor, Weavah mostly acts in stage plays. These plays often reflect political or religious topics. In 2008, he played the lead role in a college drama titled The Exonerated" where he played the role of Delbert Tibbs. Later in 2008, he played the character Thomas Brown in the religious drama titled "Note to God". In 2009, he played a lead role in the Gospel stage play titled "Power of One". In 2012, he co-produced another Religious drama titled "Love Others". His production has also appeared in films such as Ping Pong Playa and Hurricane Season.[2]

FilmographyEdit

Film
Year Film Role Movie Notes
2007 Ping Pong Playa Production Produced by Jessica Yu
2008 Hurricane Season Production starring Forest Whitaker & Lil Wayne
2014 The High Director Filming
Television
Year Show Role Network
2005 ESPN's First Take Feature ESPN
2007 Rob & Big Production MTV
2007 Unique Whips Production FOX Speed
2008 Breaking Bad Production AMC show
2011 Blue Mountain State Production Spike TV
2011 Rob Dyrdek's Fantasy Factory Production MTV
2012 Parks and Recreation Production NBC (Season 4 Episode 2)
2012 Law & Order Production NBC (Rhodium Nights)
2012 Best Friends Forever Production NBC (Single & Lovin' it)
2012 Numbnuts (TV series) Production MTV2
Music
Year Title Role Notes
2007 My Rims Writer Billboard top 100

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ The A-Town Grind, Stylus. Retrieved October 28, 2007.
  2. ^ Movie Writers, NY Times. Retrieved July 21, 2011.

External linksEdit