Lee Wei Ling

Lee Wei Ling is a Singaporean neurologist. She was the director of the National Neuroscience Institute.

Lee Wei Ling
李玮玲
Born
Lee Wei Ling

1955 (age 66–67)
NationalitySingaporean
Alma materUniversity of Singapore (MBBS)
OccupationNeurologist
Parent(s)Lee Kuan Yew (father)
Kwa Geok Choo (mother)
FamilyLee Hsien Loong (brother)
Lee Hsien Yang (brother)

CareerEdit

Lee received a President's Scholarship in 1973, before studying in the medical faculty of the University of Singapore (now the National University of Singapore), where she graduated top of her class with a Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery degree before specialising in paediatrics.[1]

She began working in the paediatric ward at the Singapore General Hospital (SGH) and received board certification from the American Board of Clinical Neuropsychology.

Personal lifeEdit

Lee is the daughter of Lee Kuan Yew, the first prime minister of Singapore. She is also the younger sister of Lee Hsien Loong, the incumbent prime minister of Singapore, and the older sister of Lee Hsien Yang, a businessman.

In August 2020, Lee stated she had been diagnosed with progressive supranuclear palsy, a rare brain disorder that results in the weakening of certain muscles.[2]

Administrator of Lee Kuan Yew's willEdit

Lee and her brother, Lee Hsien Yang, are the joint administrators and executors of Lee Kuan Yew's will. However, they were in a dispute in 2017 with Lee Hsien Loong over their late father's will with regard to the house at 38 Oxley Road. They "felt threatened by Lee Hsien Loong's misuse of his position and influence over the Singapore government and its agencies to drive his personal agenda". They alleged that their brother thwarted the will of their father in order to use the house as a monument to milk his father's legacy. They also criticised the influence of Ho Ching over the government, and alleged that the Prime Minister harboured political ambitions for his son, Li Hongyi.[3] A special parliamentary session was held to clear the Prime Minister of any wrongdoings and the siblings agreed to keep the dispute private after the session.[4][5]


Family tree of Lee Kuan Yew
Lee Bok Boon
1846–1920
Seow Huan Neo
1850–c. 1931
Lee Hoon Leong
1871–1942
Ko Liem Nio
1883–1959
Lee Chin Koon
1903–1997[6]
Chua Jim Neo
1907–1980
Lee Kuan Yew
1923–2015
Kwa Geok Choo
1920–2010
Dennis Lee Kim Yew
1925-2003[7]
Gloria Lee (Woo) Sau Yin[8]Freddy Lee Thiam Yew
1927-2012[9]
Eleanor Ngo Puay Chin[8]Monica Lee Kim Mon
b. 1929 or 1930[10]
George Chan Chor Cheung[8]Dr Lee Suan Yew
b. 1933[11]
Pamela Chong[8]
Wong Ming Yang
1951–1982
Lee Hsien Loong
b. 1952
Ho Ching
b. 1953
Lee Wei Ling
b. 1955
Lee Hsien Yang
b. 1957
Lim Suet Fern
b. 1957
Li Xiuqi
b. 1981
Li Yipeng
b. 1982
Li Hongyi
b. 1987
Li Haoyi
b. 1989
Li Shengwu
b. 1985
Li Huanwu
b. 1986
Li Shaowu
b. 1995

PublicationsEdit

  • "Lee Wei Ling - A Hakka Woman's Singapore" (2015).[12]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "To what end, all the President's Scholars?". The Straits Times. Singapore Press Holdings. 30 August 2015. Retrieved 5 December 2020.
  2. ^ "Lee Wei Ling diagnosed with rare brain disorder with no cure, wishes it was a nightmare". AsiaOne. 2020-08-11. Retrieved 2020-12-05.
  3. ^ Holmes, Oliver (14 June 2017). "Singapore PM Lee Hsien Loong denounced by siblings". The Guardian. Retrieved 11 July 2020.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  4. ^ Kotwani, Monica; Zhu, Melissa; See Kit, Tang (3 July 2017). "PAP MPs raise questions over Oxley Road dispute in Parliament debate". CNA. Archived from the original on 15 December 2017. Retrieved 15 December 2017.
  5. ^ Abu Baker, Jalelah; Chia, Lianne (3 July 2017). "'An ugly media circus': Workers' Party urges settlement of Oxley Road dispute in court". CNA. Archived from the original on 11 December 2017. Retrieved 12 December 2017.
  6. ^ Chua, Alivin. "Lee Chin Koon". Singapore Infopedia.
  7. ^ "Kuan Yew's brother Dennis dies". Archived from the original on 8 January 2019. Retrieved 8 January 2019.
  8. ^ a b c d "Mr. Lee Kuan Yew, Prime Minister of Singapore, and his family, 1989 – BookSG". National Library Board, Singapore. Archived from the original on 4 March 2016. Retrieved 25 February 2016.
  9. ^ "Lee Kuan Yew bids farewell to brother". Archived from the original on 20 February 2014. Retrieved 31 January 2014.
  10. ^ "The Lee Kuan Yew I remember: His sister Monica Lee, 85". Archived from the original on 8 January 2019. Retrieved 8 January 2019.
  11. ^ Lee Kuan Yew (1998). The Singapore Story. Singapore: Marshall Cavendish.
  12. ^ "A Hakka Woman's Singapore Stories (English)".

External linksEdit