Kulpara, South Australia

Kulpara is a rural town in South Australia, situated on the Copper Coast Highway and Upper Yorke Road[3] in the Hummocks Range at the northern end of Yorke Peninsula.[4]

Kulpara
South Australia
KulparaElephantWalkCafe.JPG
Cafe in the former church buildings at Kulpara
Kulpara is located in South Australia
Kulpara
Kulpara
Coordinates34°04′S 138°02′E / 34.06°S 138.04°E / -34.06; 138.04Coordinates: 34°04′S 138°02′E / 34.06°S 138.04°E / -34.06; 138.04
Established1864[1]
Postcode(s)5552
Elevation117 m (384 ft)[2]
Location
LGA(s)District Council of Barunga West
State electorate(s)Goyder
Federal division(s)Grey
Localities around Kulpara:
Paskeville Ninnes South Hummocks
Lochiel
Melton
Paskeville
Kulpara South Hummocks
Kainton Kainton
Clinton
Port Arthur
Port Wakefield

The name Kulpara is derived from an Aboriginal word Kula meaning "eucalyptus". The area was proclaimed in 1862, surveyed in 1864 and settled soon after. The township itself was surveyed in 1932 and proclaimed in 1934. A community hall was built in 1902, replaced by a soldiers' memorial hall in 1953. The school opened in 1877 and expanded in 1957. The Bible Christian church foundation stone was laid in 1879 with services starting soon after.[1] The church building is now a convenience store.[5]

It was the seat of its own municipality, the District Council of Kulpara, from 1878 to 1932.[6]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b "Kulpara". SA Memory. State Library of South Australia. 17 April 2009. Retrieved 23 September 2014.
  2. ^ "Kulpara, Australia". Falling Grain. Retrieved 19 September 2014.
  3. ^ "Naming of State Rural Roads - Mid North" (PDF). Government of South Australia. 16 December 2013. Archived from the original (PDF) on 4 September 2014. Retrieved 15 September 2014.
  4. ^ Google (19 September 2014). "Kulpara, South Australia" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved 19 September 2014.
  5. ^ "650 Copper Coast Highway KULPARA Food / Beverage / Hospitality". CommercialRealEstate.com.au. Fairfax Media. Retrieved 23 September 2014.
  6. ^ Marsden, Susan (2012). "A History of South Australian Councils to 1936" (PDF). Local Government Association of South Australia. p. 11. Retrieved 30 October 2015.