The Kharal also spelled Kharral or Kharl is a very large tribe centered in Punjab Region of traditionally semi-pastoral [1] Jat[2][3][4][5] or Rajput status.[6]

The Kharals predominantly inhabit the Western plains of Punjab (i.e. west of Lahore) that lie below the Salt Range and its surrounding areas.[7] The Kharrals seem to be most concentrated in the Ravi River Valley between Lahore and the former Montgomery District, this corresponds well to Ain-i-Akbari (1595 CE) listing of "Kharal Jatt" Zamindaris in different Parganas.[8]

The Kharals have numerous subdivisions some of which include e Randhaira, Lalhaira, Rubera, Lodikey, Churiara, Khar, Bhandra and Gogera; the Kharals use many titles including Rai, Chaudhry, Malik and Mian.[9]

The Kharals are famous in the Indian Subcontinent due to the one of the great Punjabi tragic Romances called Mirza Sahiban. The stories protagonist is Mirza Jatt, son of the Chief of the Kharal Jats of Danabad and falls in love with his cousin Sahiban of the Sial Jats.[10]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Gupta, H.R. (2001). History of the Sikhs: The Sikh commonwealth or Rise and fall of Sikh misls. History of the Sikhs. Munshiram Manoharlal. pp. 269–270. ISBN 978-81-215-0540-6. Retrieved 30 July 2022.
  2. ^ Quddus, S.A. (1992). Punjab, the Land of Beauty, Love, and Mysticism. Royal Book Company. p. 202. ISBN 978-969-407-130-5. Retrieved 29 July 2022. The father of Mirza was cast in a different mould. He was a typical Kharral, an epitome of Jat values.
  3. ^ Khan, Imran (30 September 2021). "Social Stratification in a Punjab Village in New Millennium". Pakistan Social Sciences Review. Fatima Gohar Educational and Welfare Society. 5 (III): 465. doi:10.35484/pssr.2021(5-iii)34. ISSN 2664-0422.
  4. ^ Evans, David Denton Edward; Jenkins, Bertram; Davies, Susan; Spence, Rebecca (2014). "Romance tragedy of 'Romeo and Juliet' Style: A study in Qualitative Research with special focus on India and Nepal in the time period 1993-2013". {{cite journal}}: Cite journal requires |journal= (help)
  5. ^ Raja, Ali (24 December 2010), "Democracy's Sahiban: Chaudhry Nisar Ali Khan", LUBP website, archived from the original on 20 January 2019, retrieved 6 January 2021
  6. ^ Khan, Hussain Ahmad (2004). Re-Thinking Punjab: The Construction of Siraiki Identity. Research and Publication Centre, National College of Arts, Lahore. p. 131. ISBN 978-9-69862-309-8. Retrieved 14 January 2021.
  7. ^ Ahmed, Iftikhar (1984). "TERRITORIAL DISTRIBUTION OF JATT CASTES IN PUNJAB c. 1595 - c. 1881". Proceedings of the Indian History Congress. Indian History Congress. 45: 429. ISSN 2249-1937. JSTOR 44140224. Retrieved 28 July 2022. the Langah, Kharral and Marral, are placed by him in the 'western plains'- whereby is implied the area west of Lahore bue excluding the Salt Range and the submontane tracts
  8. ^ Ahmed, Iftikhar (1984). "TERRITORIAL DISTRIBUTION OF JATT CASTES IN PUNJAB c. 1595 - c. 1881". Proceedings of the Indian History Congress. Indian History Congress. 45: 430. ISSN 2249-1937. JSTOR 44140224. Retrieved 28 July 2022. They are found in large numbers only along the valley of the Ravi, from its junction with the Chinab to the boundary between Lahore and Montgomery".19 This is already reflected in the sixteenth century Zamindari possesions of the Kharrals : two of the three (identified) parganas listed in our table lie on the banks of the Ravi. Apart from these the Ain mentions five more parganas (unidentified) under the Kharrals, four of which are placed in the Rechna Doab portions of Sarkars Multan and Dipalpur, aad one in Bari Doab ( Sarkar Dipalpur)
  9. ^ Haider, Karim (31 December 2017). "Impact of Politico-economic Changes on the Resettlement of Kharal Tribe in Punjab". Pakistan Social Sciences Review. Fatima Gohar Educational and Welfare Society. 1 (II): 179. doi:10.35484/pssr.2017(1-ii)15. ISSN 2664-0422.
  10. ^ Muhammad Hassan Miraj (1 April 2013). "The ballad of Mirza Saheba'n". Dawn (newspaper). Retrieved 14 January 2021.

External linksEdit