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Khanom la (Thai: ขนมลา, pronounced [kʰa.nǒm lāː]) is an ancient dessert in Nakhon Si Thammarat, Thailand, that has shape gold color is thin and gathered like silk. Khanom la has uncertain shape depending on your wants. And color of khanom la is make from yolk to become more colorful.[1]

Khanom La is a traditional snack of southern part of Thailand, made from flour. It is a one of five things to set as a sacrificial offering for giving to monks in Thai Sart Day (mid-year festival) in October. Thai Sart day is an important day for southern people of Thailand especially in Nakhon Si Thammarat Province. Khanom La is the representative of clothes given to dead people.

Khanom La can be separated in two types: La Chet and La Korb. Khanom La Chet is thick and has less oil. When it is cooked, it will be formed in to a semicircle. Meanwhile, Khanom La Korb is a crispy one. It is done by adding more sugar on top of the normal Khanom La Chet and dry it in the sun. Another way to cook Khanom La is to add more flour, and more oil. When it is done, it will be rolled with a stick then let dry and pulled out. [2]

Nowadays, people are selling Khanom La all year round, not only in October that has an event anymore.


Contents

HistoryEdit

In the past, khanom la was made from coconut shell because formerly, there were no cans. People will made in the coconut shell several small holes. In Thailand we call coconut is “Kala”(Thai: กะลา). Now, they use the canned drilling small holes into device instead of coconut shell.[3]

BeliefEdit

From Nakhom Si Thammarat period, Villagers in Pak Phanang knew how to make khanom la used for Tenth Lunar Month Festival of Nakhom Si Thammarat period. In the past, They believed the deceased ancestors to be dire in the grave will return to earth. To get a charitable donation given by grandchildren. Which are Khanom la same as clothes, food and facilities that necessary to use.[4]

Ingredients[5]Edit

1. Flour 2 cup

2. Sugar ½ cup

3. Palm sugar ¼ cup

4. Oil ½ cup

5. Boiled yolk 1 yolk

6. Water ½ cup

The cooking method[6]Edit

1. Mix sugar palm with sugar and water. Stir until feel that a little sticky.

2. Take sugar mixture from the first step to mix with flour. Mix it until the flour is soft. And then add a little of boiled water.

3. Add oil to the pan and beaten yolk all over the surface. Use low heat and when the pan is hot enough, add the dough to the container that have small holes.

4. Move the container over the pan to let the dough flow through the small holes into the pan.

5. When it is turn to brown-yellow color, flow, bring it to the plate and let it dry. Finish!


See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ ข่าวสด."ขนมลา เมืองนครศรีธรรมราช". Retrieved 2017-10-13.[Online].
  2. ^ (Thipsukhum, 1997).{{https://th.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E0%B8%82%E0%B8%99%E0%B8%A1%E0%B8%A5%E0%B8%B2%7Ctitle=ขนมลา%7Caccess-date=June 1997 }}
  3. ^ k@pook."ประวัติขนมลา ขนมประจำเทศกาลบุญสารทเดือนสิบของชาวใต้". Retrieved 2017-10-13.[Online].
  4. ^ rukbankerd."การทำขนมลา". Retrieved 2017-10-12.[Online].
  5. ^ (How to make Khanom La).{{http://www.viteetam.com/%E0%B8%AD%E0%B8%B2%E0%B8%AB%E0%B8%B2%E0%B8%A3-%E0%B9%80%E0%B8%84%E0%B8%A3%E0%B8%B7%E0%B9%88%E0%B8%AD%E0%B8%87%E0%B8%94%E0%B8%B7%E0%B9%88%E0%B8%A1/%E0%B8%A7%E0%B8%B4%E0%B8%98%E0%B8%B5%E0%B8%97%E0%B8%B3%E0%B8%82%E0%B8%99%E0%B8%A1%E0%B8%A5%E0%B8%B2/}}
  6. ^ (How to make Khanom La).{{http://www.viteetam.com/%E0%B8%AD%E0%B8%B2%E0%B8%AB%E0%B8%B2%E0%B8%A3-%E0%B9%80%E0%B8%84%E0%B8%A3%E0%B8%B7%E0%B9%88%E0%B8%AD%E0%B8%87%E0%B8%94%E0%B8%B7%E0%B9%88%E0%B8%A1/%E0%B8%A7%E0%B8%B4%E0%B8%98%E0%B8%B5%E0%B8%97%E0%B8%B3%E0%B8%82%E0%B8%99%E0%B8%A1%E0%B8%A5%E0%B8%B2/}}

• How to make Khanom La. (August 14, 2012). Retrieved March 22, 2018, http://www.viteetam.com/%E0%B8%AD%E0%B8%B2%E0%B8%AB%E0%B8%B2%E0%B8%A3-%E0%B9%80%E0%B8%84%E0%B8%A3%E0%B8%B7%E0%B9%88%E0%B8%AD%E0%B8%87%E0%B8%94%E0%B8%B7%E0%B9%88%E0%B8%A1/%E0%B8%A7%E0%B8%B4%E0%B8%98%E0%B8%B5%E0%B8%97%E0%B8%B3%E0%B8%82%E0%B8%99%E0%B8%A1%E0%B8%A5%E0%B8%B2/ • Thipsukhum, K. Food traditional: Khanom La sacrificial offering snack. Kitchen. 4 (38) :90 - 92, June 1997