Kansas City Police Department

The Kansas City Police Department (KCPD) is the principal law enforcement agency serving Kansas City, Missouri. Missouri Supreme Court Justice Brent Powell swore in Richard C. Smith as the 45th Chief of Police of the Kansas City Missouri Police Department on August 15, 2017.[2] Col. Smith, who served as head of the KCPD's Central Patrol Division,[3] became the city's 45th police chief on August 15, 2017.[4]

Kansas City Police Department (Missouri)
Patch of the Kansas City Police Department
Patch of the Kansas City Police Department
Flag of Kansas City, Missouri
Flag of Kansas City, Missouri
Common nameKansas City Police Department
AbbreviationKCPD
MottoTo Serve and Protect
Agency overview
Formed
  • April 15, 1874 (1874-04-15)
  • (147 years ago)
Preceding agency
  • Kansas City Police Department
Employees2,020 (2021)
Annual budget$249 million (2021)[1]
Jurisdictional structure
Operations jurisdictionKansas City, Missouri, Missouri, US
US-MO-Kansas City-Entire City.png
Map of Kansas City Police Department (Missouri)'s jurisdiction.
Legal jurisdictionCity of Kansas City, Missouri
Governing bodyGovernor of Missouri
General nature
Operational structure
Headquarters1125 Locust Street, Kansas City, Missouri 64106
Police Officers1,259 (2021)
Corrections and Civilians607 (2021)
Police Commissioners responsible
Agency executives
  • Colonel Richard Smith, Chief of Police
  • Deputy Chief Karen True, Executive Services Bureau
  • Deputy Chief Shawn Wadle, Administration Bureau
  • Deputy Chief Karl Oakman, Patrol Bureau
  • Deputy Chief Robert Kuehl, Professional Development and Research Bureau
  • Deputy Chief Mark Francisco, Investigations Bureau
Stations
6
  • Central Patrol Division
  • East Patrol Division
  • Metro Patrol Division
  • North Patrol Division
  • Shoal Creek Patrol Division
  • South Patrol Division
Facilities
Detention Centers1
Website
Kansas City Police Department official website

OverviewEdit

The Mission of the Kansas City Missouri Police Department is to protect and serve with professionalism, honor and integrity.[5]

Kansas City Police Department is the largest city police agency in Missouri, based on number of employees, city population, and geographic area served.

Board of CommissionersEdit

Kansas City Board of Police Commissioners
 
Logo of the Kansas City Police Department
Formation1943
TypeCivilian Oversight Board
PurposeTo oversee the Kansas City Police Department and set department policy and goals
Headquarters1125 Locust St.
Kansas City, Missouri, U.S.
Region served
Kansas City, Missouri, U.S.
President-Commissioner
Nathan Garrett
WebsiteKansas City Board of Police Commissioners


The Kansas City Board of Police Commissioners is responsible for the operation of the KCPD. The Board sets policy, makes promotions, holds both closed and open meetings and coordinates with the Chief of Police in providing police services to the citizens. Four of the five members of the board are selected by the governor of the state of Missouri, following approval of the Missouri legislature, with the mayor serving as the fifth member. Commissioners serve four year terms, however they serve at the pleasure of the governor and can be replaced.

Currently, those Commissioners[6] are:

Commissioned/sworn positionsEdit

The structure of the Senior Command staff of The Police is:

Title Insignia
Chief of Police
Deputy Chief
Major
Captain
Sergeant
Police Officer
Probationary Police Officer

SidearmsEdit

The main sidearm used by the KCMO PD is the Glock 22 or Glock 23 both in .40 S&W. Officers also had the choice of choosing the Smith & Wesson Sigma but that is no longer chosen by officers as was the S&W 4026 (Smith & Wesson Model 4006) .40 S&W which had the KCMO PD Badge and KCPD engraved on the slide.[7]

HistoryEdit

The Kansas City Police Department was founded in 1874. George Caleb Bingham was the first president of the Board of Police Commissioners. The first Chief was Thomas M. Speers.

The Kansas City preventive patrol experiment was a landmark experiment carried out between 1972 and 1973 by the Kansas City Police Department. It was evaluated by the Police Foundation. It was designed to test the assumption that the presence (or potential presence) of police officers in marked cars reduced the likelihood of a crime being committed. It was the first study to demonstrate that research into the effectiveness of different policing styles could be carried out responsibly and safely.

MediaEdit

The Tactical Response Teams of KCPD was featured in A&E's reality series Kansas City SWAT.[8]

The Kansas City, Missouri Police Department has been portrayed in numerous episodes of the television show COPS.

The Homicide Unit of the Kansas City, Missouri Police Department was portrayed in the A&E Network's documentary series entitled The First 48.

A viral video circulated on Twitter showing KCPD officers assaulting nonviolent protesters, bringing national attention to the department.[9]

ControversiesEdit

During the 2020 George Floyd protests, KCPD fired chemical agents, such as pepper spray, at protesters.[10] In wake of these crowd control measures, civil rights groups have called for the resignation of Police Chief Rick Smith, who defended the officers' actions. [11][12]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Sullivan, Carl; Baranauckas, Carla (June 26, 2020). "Here's how much money goes to police departments in largest cities across the U.S." USA Today. Archived from the original on July 14, 2020. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  2. ^ "KCMO.gov". Kcmo.org. Retrieved 2016-07-20. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  3. ^ "KC's new police chief is Major Rick Smith". July 28, 2017.
  4. ^ "Vowing to work to reduce crime, Rick Smith is sworn in as Kansas City's police chief". kansascity.
  5. ^ "KCPD Mission Statement". KCMO.gov. Retrieved 2016-07-20. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  6. ^ "BOARD OF POLICE COMMISSIONERS". kcpd.org. Retrieved 2016-07-20. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  7. ^ https://i.redd.it/l9x1he7w64wy.jpg
  8. ^ "Kansas City SWAT | TV Guide". TVGuide.com.
  9. ^ Waldrop, Theresa (3 June 2020). "Video shows police pepper-spraying a protester. All he seemed to be doing was yelling". CNN. Retrieved 3 June 2020.
  10. ^ Cummings, Ian (1 June 2020). "Photo shows Kansas City police officer pepper spray man in face". The Kansas City Star. Retrieved 3 June 2020.
  11. ^ Rice, Glenn E. (3 June 2020). "Civil rights groups say Kansas City police chief should resign". The Kansas City Star. Retrieved 3 June 2020.
  12. ^ Rice, Glenn E. and Kevin Hardy (3 June 2020). "Jackson County prosecutor is reviewing KCPD officers' use of pepper spray on protester". The Kansas City Star. Retrieved 3 June 2020.