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The Kam–Tai languages, also called Dong–Tai (Chinese: 侗台语支) or Zhuang–Dong (Chinese: 壮侗语族) in China, are a proposed primary branch of the Kra–Dai language family. The Kam–Tai grouping is primarily used in China, including by Liang & Zhang (1996).

Kam–Tai
Dong–Tai
Zhuang-Dong
Geographic
distribution
Southern China, Southeast Asia, Hainan
Linguistic classification Kra–Dai
  • Kam–Tai
Subdivisions
Glottolog kamt1241[1]

Liang & Zhang (1996) classify Kam–Sui, Be, and Tai together as the Dong-Tai 侗台 branch, due to the large number of lexical items shared by all three branches vis-a-vis the more divergent Kra (Chinese: Geyang 仡央) and Hlai (Chinese: Li) branches. Liang & Zhang (1996) also propose a reconstruction of Proto-Kam–Tai.

A Kam–Tai group consisting of Kam–Sui and Tai is accepted by Edmondson & Solnit (1988).[2][3] Hansell (1988)[4] considers Be to be a sister of the Tai branch based on shared vocabulary, and proposes a Be–Tai grouping within Kam–Tai.

However, following Ostapirat (2005),[5] scholars outside China now usually do not make use of the Kam–Tai grouping.

HistoryEdit

Liang & Zhang (1996:18)[6] estimate that the Kam-Sui, Tai, and Hlai branches had already formed by about 5,000 years B.P.

ReconstructionEdit

Proto-Kam-Tai has been reconstructed by Liang & Zhang (1996), drawing data from the Tai, Kam-Sui, Be, Lakkia, Biao, and Hlai branches but not the Kra branch. Wu (2002) presents a reconstruction of Proto-Kra-Dai, which is based on data from the Tai, Kam-Sui, Hlai, and Kra branches.[7]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin, eds. (2017). "Kam–Tai". Glottolog 3.0. Jena, Germany: Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History. 
  2. ^ Edmondson, Jerold A. and David B. Solnit, editors. 1988. Comparative Kadai: Linguistic studies beyond Tai. Summer Institute of Linguistics and the University of Texas at Arlington Publications in Linguistics, 86. Dallas: Summer Institute of Linguistics and the University of Texas at Arlington. vii, 374 p.
  3. ^ Edmondson, Jerold A. and David B. Solnit, editors. 1997. Comparative Kadai: the Tai branch. Summer Institute of Linguistics and the University of Texas at Arlington Publications in Linguistics, 124. Dallas: Summer Institute of Linguistics and the University of Texas at Arlington. vi, 382 p.
  4. ^ Hansell, Mark. 1988. The Relation of Be to Tai: Evidence from Tones and Initials. In Comparative Kadai: Linguistic studies beyond Tai. Edited by Jerold A. Edmondson and David B. Solnit. Summer Institute of Linguistics and The University of Texas at Arlington Publications in Linguistics No. 86: 239-288.
  5. ^ Ostapirat, Weera. (2005). "Kra–Dai and Austronesian: Notes on phonological correspondences and vocabulary distribution", pp. 107–131 in Sagart, Laurent, Blench, Roger & Sanchez-Mazas, Alicia (eds.), The Peopling of East Asia: Putting Together Archaeology, Linguistics and Genetics. London/New York: Routledge-Curzon.
  6. ^ Liang Min 梁敏 & Zhang Junru 张均如. 1996. Dongtai yuzu gailun 侗台语族概论 / An introduction to the Kam–Tai languages. Beijing: China Social Sciences Academy Press 中国社会科学出版社. ISBN 9787500416814
  7. ^ Wu, Anqi 吴安其. 2002. Hanzangyu tongyuan yanjiu 汉藏语同源研究. Beijing: Minzu University Press 中央民族大学出版社. ISBN 7-81056-611-3 [This book contains Wu's reconstructions of Proto-Sino-Tibetan, Proto-Tibeto-Burman, Proto-Hmong-Mien, and Proto-Kra-Dai.]
  • Edmondson, J. A., & Solnit, D. B. (eds.) (1988). Comparative Kadai: linguistic studies beyond Tai. Summer Institute of Linguistics publications in linguistics, no. 86. Arlington, TX: Summer Institute of Linguistics. ISBN 0-88312-066-6
  • Liang Min 梁敏 & Zhang Junru 张均如. 1996. Dongtai yuzu gailun 侗台语族概论 / An introduction to the Kam–Tai languages. Beijing: China Social Sciences Academy Press 中国社会科学出版社. ISBN 9787500416814
  • Ni Dabai 倪大白. 1990. Dongtai yu gailun 侗台语概论 / An introduction to the Kam-Tai languages. Beijing: Central Nationalities Research Institute Press 中央民族学院出版社.