Open main menu

Jordan Bell (born January 7, 1995) is an American professional basketball player for the Minnesota Timberwolves of the National Basketball Association (NBA). He played college basketball for the Oregon Ducks. As a junior in 2017, Bell earned second-team all-conference honors in the Pac-12, when he was also named the conference's Defensive Player of the Year. He was drafted in the second round of the 2017 NBA draft by the Golden State Warriors. Bell won his first championship in his rookie season when the Warriors defeated the Cleveland Cavaliers in 2018.

Jordan Bell
Minnesota Timberwolves
PositionPower forward / Center
LeagueNBA
Personal information
Born (1995-01-07) January 7, 1995 (age 24)
Los Angeles, California
NationalityAmerican
Listed height6 ft 9 in (2.06 m)
Listed weight224 lb (102 kg)
Career information
High schoolLong Beach Polytechnic
(Long Beach, California)
CollegeOregon (2013–2017)
NBA draft2017 / Round: 2 / Pick: 38th overall
Selected by the Chicago Bulls
Playing career2017–present
Career history
20172019Golden State Warriors
2019–presentMinnesota Timberwolves
Career highlights and awards
Stats at NBA.com
Stats at Basketball-Reference.com

Contents

High schoolEdit

Bell was born in Los Angeles,[1] and attended Long Beach Polytechnic High School in Long Beach, California.[2]

College careerEdit

Bell committed to the University of Oregon to play college basketball.[3]

Bell redshirted in 2013. As a redshirt freshman at Oregon, Bell averaged 5.1 points, 6.1 rebounds and 2.7 blocks per game.[4] His 94 blocks were a school record for a season.[5] As a redshirt sophomore, he averaged 7.0 points, 5.4 rebounds and 1.8 blocks per game.[6] As a redshirt junior, Bell averaged 10.9 points, 8.8 rebounds and 2.3 blocks per game and helped lead Oregon to the Final Four.[7][8]

Professional careerEdit

Golden State Warriors (2017–2019)Edit

On April 18, 2017, Bell declared for the 2017 NBA draft,[9] and was picked with the 38th pick by the Chicago Bulls and later traded to the Golden State Warriors for $3.5 million in cash considerations. [10]

Bell participated in the 2017 NBA Summer League.

On October 23, 2017, Bell dunked the ball after bouncing it off the backboard to himself during at the end of a 133–103 rout over the Dallas Mavericks. The play angered the Mavericks' players and coaches and ignited a debate on social media.[11] On December 1, 2017, Bell scored 16 points on 8-for-10 shooting in 16 minutes of playing time against the Orlando Magic in a 133–112 victory.[12] On December 22, against the Los Angeles Lakers, he scored a career-high 20 points on 9-for-13 shooting to go with his career-high 10 rebounds in 25 minutes.[13] On April 14, 2018, Bell made his debut in the NBA playoffs, coming off of the bench with three points and two rebounds in a 113–92 win over the San Antonio Spurs.[14] The Warriors made it to the 2018 NBA Finals where they would sweep the Cleveland Cavaliers in four games.

Bell played in the 2018 NBA Summer League for the Warriors.[15] On March 27, 2019, the Warriors suspended Bell for one game due to "conduct detrimental to the team".[16][17] On May 16, 2019, Bell came off the bench and scored a playoff career high 11 points to go with 3 rebounds, 2 steals, and an assist and a block apiece in a 114 to 111 win.[18] On May 20, Bell made his first career start in a series clenching win against the Portland Trail Blazers, contributing 7 points, 2 assists, and a steal.[19] The Warriors reaches the 2019 NBA Finals, but were defeated in 6 games by the Toronto Raptors.

Minnesota Timberwolves (2019–present)Edit

On June 28, 2019, the Warriors extended Bell a qualifying offer, making him a restricted free agent.[20] He signed an offer sheet with the Minnesota Timberwolves.[21] On July 11, Bell signed with the Minnesota Timberwolves.[22]

Career statisticsEdit

Legend
  GP Games played   GS  Games started  MPG  Minutes per game
 FG%  Field goal percentage  3P%  3-point field goal percentage  FT%  Free throw percentage
 RPG  Rebounds per game  APG  Assists per game  SPG  Steals per game
 BPG  Blocks per game  PPG  Points per game  Bold  Career high
Denotes season in which Bell won an NBA Championship

NBAEdit

Regular seasonEdit

Year Team GP GS MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG
2017–18 Golden State 57 13 14.2 .627 .000 .682 3.6 1.8 .6 1.0 4.6
2018–19 Golden State 68 3 11.6 .516 .000 .610 2.7 1.1 .3 .8 3.3
Career 125 16 12.8 .570 .000 .647 3.1 1.4 .4 .9 3.9

PlayoffsEdit

Year Team GP GS MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG
2018 Golden State 17 0 10.2 .531 .000 .500 2.8 .9 .4 .5 2.4
2019 Golden State 15 2 7.1 .548 .000 .700 1.3 .7 .3 .5 2.7
Career 32 2 8.7 .540 .000 .583 2.1 .8 .3 .5 2.6

CollegeEdit

Year Team GP GS MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG
2014–15 Oregon 35 20 23.7 .597 .524 6.1 1.3 .8 2.7 5.1
2015–16 Oregon 31 4 20.5 .576 .000 .519 5.3 1.2 1.1 1.7 6.8
2016–17 Oregon 39 38 28.8 .636 .214 .701 8.8 1.8 1.3 2.3 10.9
Career 105 62 24.7 .610 .188 .630 6.8 1.5 1.1 2.2 7.8

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Jordan Bell - Men's Basketball". University of Oregon Athletics.
  2. ^ Guardabascio, Mike (March 31, 2017). "Jordan Bell has traveled a long way from Long Beach to Final Four with Oregon". San Bernardino Sun. Retrieved October 24, 2017.
  3. ^ Guardabascio, Mike; Hendrickson, Tyler (November 14, 2012). "Basketball: Poly's Jordan Bell Commits To Oregon". Gazettes Sports. Retrieved October 24, 2017.
  4. ^ Alger, Tyson (December 10, 2015). "Jordan Bell could make debut Saturday when No. 24 Oregon Ducks face Boise State". The Oregonian. Retrieved October 24, 2017.
  5. ^ Whicker, Mark (March 25, 2016). "Whicker: Jordan Bell brings block party to Oregon Ducks". Daily News. Los Angeles, California. Retrieved October 24, 2017.
  6. ^ Alger, Tyson (October 13, 2016). "Jordan Bell expected to play smaller for Ducks: Oregon rundown". The Oregonian. Retrieved October 24, 2017.
  7. ^ Greif, Andrew (March 30, 2017). "Jordan Bell's summer work has paid off during Oregon Ducks' Final Four run". The Oregonian. Retrieved October 24, 2017.
  8. ^ Helfand, Zach (March 31, 2017). "Given direction, Oregon's Jordan Bell finds way to the Final Four". Los Angeles Times. ISSN 0458-3035. Retrieved October 24, 2017.
  9. ^ "Jordan Bell latest Oregon player to declare for draft". FOX Sports. Associated Press. April 18, 2017. Retrieved October 24, 2017.
  10. ^ "Warriors Trade Into Draft, Select Jordan Bell In Second Round". NBA.com. June 22, 2017. Retrieved June 23, 2017.
  11. ^ "Kevin Durant: Jordan Bell's dunk 'an incredible play, but...'". Retrieved October 26, 2017.
  12. ^ "Jordan Bell". ESPN.com.
  13. ^ Letourneau, Connor (December 23, 2017). "Rookie Jordan Bell starts, impresses as Warriors hold off Lakers". SFGate.
  14. ^ "Durant, defending champ Warriors get defensive, beat Spurs". ESPN.com. April 14, 2018. Retrieved April 14, 2018.
  15. ^ Medina, Mark (July 9, 2018). "NBA summer league: Jordan Bell to sit out vs Dallas with sore left shoulder". The Mercury News. Retrieved July 10, 2018.
  16. ^ "Warriors Forward Jordan Bell Suspended". NBA.com. March 27, 2019. Retrieved March 27, 2019.
  17. ^ Friedell, Nick (March 27, 2019). "Forward Bell suspended one game by Warriors". ESPN.com. Retrieved March 27, 2019.
  18. ^ "Jordan Bell's best playoff game helps Warriors grab 2-0 lead in Western Conference finals - SFChronicle.com". San Francisco Chronicle. May 17, 2019.
  19. ^ "Jordan Bell: Stepping Up On The Biggest Stage". Golden State Warriors.
  20. ^ "Sources: Warriors extend Jordan Bell qualifying offer, make him RFA". June 28, 2019.
  21. ^ Amaranthus, Bri (July 2, 2019). "REPORT: Jordan Bell agrees to contract with Minnesota". Yahoo.com. Retrieved July 2, 2019.
  22. ^ "TIMBERWOLVES SIGN JORDAN BELL". NBA.com. July 11, 2019. Retrieved July 13, 2019.

External linksEdit