John Gibson Gallery

The John Gibson Gallery was a contemporary art gallery in New York City, in operation from November 1967 to 2000, and founded by John Gibson [Wikidata].[1] Early on, the gallery specialized in selling contemporary monumental–sized sculptures.[2]

John Gibson Gallery
FormationNovember 1967
Dissolved2000 (aged 28–29)
HeadquartersNew York City, New York, U.S.
LeaderJohn Gibson

HistoryEdit

PrecursorEdit

 
Invitation to contemporary art exhibition, Eighties (1992)
 
Invitation to contemporary art exhibition, German Photographers (1997)

The Park Place Gallery in New York became a center of attention for the downtown art scene and their original gallery members were all of the cutting edge.[3] John Gibson was the first director of Park Place Gallery from 1963 to 1965.[4] By 1966, the SoHo neighborhood of New York City had a growing artist community, and had revolutionized what was possible for young artists.[5]

John Gibson GalleryEdit

John Gibson later opened his own gallery in 1967, in the neighborhood of Lenox Hill.[6] Gibson was aided in running the John Gibson Gallery by his wife, Susan Gibson.[7] The John Gibson Gallery held its first group exhibition on November 1967, The Hanging, Floating, Cantilever Show.[6] The first exhibition featured installation art by Donald Judd, Andy Warhol, Kenneth Snelson, Christo, Robert Morris, Forrest Myers, and Sol LeWitt.[6] By 1972, the gallery moved locations to 392 West Broadway in Soho.

John Gibson Gallery closed in 2000,[1] and Gibson died on March 1, 2019.[1] The John Gibson Gallery has work in public collections such as the Harvard Art Museums.[8]

ArtistsEdit

The gallery is primarily known for the Minimalist, land art, arte povera, conceptual artists and European artists it has represented and whose careers it helped launch.

Gallery locationsEdit

  • 1967–1971, John Gibson Gallery, Projects for Commissions, 27 East 67th Street, New York City, New York, 10021[2]
  • 1972–1980, John Gibson Gallery, 392 West Broadway, New York City, New York, 10012[24]
  • 1981–1984, John Gibson Gallery, 205 East 78th Street, New York City, New York, 10021
  • 1984–2000, John Gibson Gallery, 568 Broadway at Prince, New York City, New York, 10012

Art fairsEdit

NotesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d e f g MacAdam, Barbara A. (2019-03-15). "Vasari Diary: On John Gibson (1933–2019), Rob Wynne, Jane Benson, Robert Murray, and Film Forum". ARTnews.com. Retrieved 2021-09-14.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  2. ^ a b c d e Rosalind, Constable (1969-03-10). "The New Art: Big Ideas for Sale". New York Magazine. New York City, NY: New York Media, LLC. p. 46.
  3. ^ Park Place Gallery original members included Mark di Suvero, Forrest Myers, Robert Grosvenor, Edwin Ruda, Dean Fleming, Leo Valledor, Peter Forakis, Tamara Melcher, Tony Magar and later David Novros, John Baldwin and Gay Glading
  4. ^ Smith, Roberta (2009-12-17). "Peter Forakis, a Sculptor of Geometric Forms, Is Dead at 82". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2021-09-14.
  5. ^ ""Reimagining Space: The Park Place Gallery Group in 1960s New York" at Blanton Museum of Art". Artforum.com. September 2008. Retrieved 2021-09-15.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  6. ^ a b c d e f g "The Hanging, Floating & Cantilevered Show An Aerial Perspective of sculpture, opening exhibition, 1967 Nov.-Dec., from the Lucy R. Lippard papers, 1930s-2007, bulk 1960-1990". Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Retrieved 2021-09-14.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  7. ^ Bongartz, Roy (1974-08-11). "Question: How Do You Buy. A Work of Art Like This?". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2021-09-14.
  8. ^ Harvard. "John Gibson Gallery". Harvard Art Museums. Retrieved 2021-09-14.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  9. ^ Rosenberg, Karen (2012-10-25). "John Armleder: 'Selected Furniture Sculptures 1979-2012'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2021-09-14.
  10. ^ Schjeldahl, Perter (1973-10-28). "What Others Call Junk, He Transforms Into Art". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2021-09-14.
  11. ^ a b c d Glueck, Grace (1982-01-22). "Art People; A French invasion". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2021-09-14.
  12. ^ a b c d e f Hopkins, Claudia; Whyte, Iain Boyd (2020-09-17). Hot Art, Cold War – Western and Northern European Writing on American Art 1945-1990. Routledge. p. 222. ISBN 978-1-351-18765-7.
  13. ^ Mellow, James R. (1973-02-17). "Art Review: Display by 7 At Westbeth". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2021-09-14.
  14. ^ Schjeldahl, Peter (1974-12-08). "Let's Not Read Narrative Art Too Seriously". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2021-09-14.
  15. ^ Russell, John (1976-04-10). "Art: Chinese Landscape Paintings at the Met". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2021-09-14.
  16. ^ Russell, John (1982-10-01). "Gallery Season, In All Its Variety, Opens Uptown and Down". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2021-09-14.
  17. ^ Russell, John (1977-04-22). "Art: Robert Irwin At the Whitney". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2021-09-14.
  18. ^ Raynor, Vivien (1986-10-03). "Art: Brooklyn Show, 'Monumental Drawing'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2021-09-14.
  19. ^ Glueck, Grace (1978-05-12). "Art: Staring Down The Camera's Eve". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2021-09-14.
  20. ^ Glueck, Grace (1979-05-18). "Kremlin. Art Dazzles: the Eye In Show at Met". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2021-09-14.
  21. ^ Russell, John (1975-01-11). "Art: Noland's Early Circles, Genuine Contributions". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2021-09-14.
  22. ^ Smith, Roberta (2001-01-05). "Art Review; Zeppelin as Madeleine, Inspiring Vast Memories". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2021-09-14.
  23. ^ Glueck, Grace (1985-01-11). "Art: Modern Shows Off Some of Best Drawings". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2021-09-14.
  24. ^ Grundberg, Andy (2021-02-23). How Photography Became Contemporary Art: Inside an Artistic Revolution from Pop to the Digital Age. Yale University Press. pp. 92–93. ISBN 978-0-300-25989-6.

External linksEdit