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The Jogi (also spelled Yogi) are a Hindu sect (nath sampraday), found in North India and Sindh, with smaller numbers in the southern Indian states of Maharashtra, Karnataka, Andhra Pradesh, Tamil Nadu and Kerala. They are also known as Nath, Jogi Nath, Jugi Nath, Nath Jogi, and Rawal.

Jogi is a colloquial term for the "yogi", which refers to the people who practiced yoga as part of their daily rituals. Over the time, this led to the formation of a community, and subsequently was formed into a caste.

Contents

History and originEdit

The Jogi are followers of yoga and worshipers of the Hindu god Shiva. Gorakshanath is credited with the systemization and categorization of the practice of yoga. This system eventually led to the formation of a separate Hindu caste. As followers of the yoga, they traditionally wear saffron-coloured clothing. The community once comprised mendicants only, but now are outnumbered by those who have taken to cultivation. They and their descendants form a caste with two sub-groups, the Kanphata and Augur. In North India, they speak Hindi and its various dialects.[citation needed]

The term Jogi now consists of three distinct classes of persons. One is purely religious mendicants of the various Jogi orders, the second includes various people who live by fortune telling, practising exorcisms and divination. And finally, there are a number of endogamous castes.[citation needed]

Jogis of HaryanaEdit

The Jogi are found throughout the state of Haryana and speak Haryanvi.[citation needed]

The Jogis of Haryana are often referred to as Padha yogi, and are divided in three groupings or orders. These are the Kanphate yogi, Padha yogi and Jangam yogi. Like in other parts of North India, the Jogi started off as mendicants and holymen, but over time formed a distinct caste. This is seen by the fact that they are strictly endogamous. Most Haryana yogis are jamindars, with very few still involved in their traditional occupation.[citation needed]

LanguageEdit

Jogi, or at least the Jogi of Pakistan, is generally considered a dialect of Marwari,[1] but may be distinct enough to count as a separate language.[2]

many yogis as an Other Backward ClassEdit

Jogi are designated Other Backward Classes in most states, starting from 1993.

Official name(s) listed in section Regions
where
have
OBC status
Designation Notes
Jogi Andhra Pradesh[3]10 12011/68/93-BCC (C ) 10 September 1993
Yogi,

Jogi, Jugi Nath

Assam[4]26 12011/68/93-BCC(C) 10/09/1993
Jogi (Jugi) Bihar[5]44 12011/68/93-BCC(C) 10 September 1993
Jogi, Nath Chandigarh[6]30 12011/99/94-BCC 11 December 1997
Garpagari

Joginath, Nathjogi

Chhattisgarh[7]22 12015/2/2007-BCC 18 August 2010
Nath,

Jogi

Daman and Diu[8]16 12011/9/94-BCC 19 October 1994
Jogi, Delhi[9]25 12011/7/95-BCC 24 May 1995
Nathjogi Goa[10]7 12011/44/96-BCC 6 December 1996
Joginath,

Jogi, Nath, Jangam-Jogi, Yogi

Haryana[11]31 12011/68/93-BCC(C) 10 September 1993

12011/44/99-BCC 21 September 2000 12015/2/2007-BCC 18 August 2010

Jogi (Jugi) Jharkhand[12]43 12015/2/2007-B.C.C. 18 August 2010
Jogi, Brahma Kapali,

Joger, Jogtin, Kapali, Raval, Ravalia Sanjogi, Jogar

Karnataka[13]29 12011/68/93-BCC (C ) 10 September 1993

12015/2/2007-BCC 18 August 2010

Jogi Kerala[14]22 12011/68/93-BCC(C) 10 September 1993
Garpagari,

Joginath, Nathjogi

Madhya Pradesh[15]28 12011/68/93-BCC(C) 10 September 1993

12011/21/1995-BCC 15 May 1995

Jogi Maharashtra[16]47 12011/68/93-BCC(C) 10 September 1993
Bharadi

Balasantoshi, Kinggriwale, Nath Bava, Nath Jogi, Nath Pandhi, Davari Gosavi

Maharashtra[16]190 12011/68/93-BCC(C) 10 September 1993

12011/21/95-BCC 15 May 1995

Jogi, or

Yogi

Orissa[17]53 12011/9/94-BCC 19 October 1994
Jogi Nath Punjab[18]42 12011/68/93-BCC 10 September 1993
Jogi,

Nath

Rajasthan[19]22 12011/9/94-BCC 19 October 1994
Jogi Sikkim[20]10 12011/36/99-BCC 4 April 2000
Jogi (including Jogis) Tamil Nadu[21]51 12011/68/93-BCC (C) 10 September 1993
Yogi,

Jogi, Nath

Tripura[22]35 12011/9/94-BCC 19 October 1994
Jogi Uttar Pradesh[23]19 12011/68/93-BCC (C) 10 September 1993
Jogi Uttarakhand[24]37 12015/13/2010-B.C.II. 8 December 2011
Jogi West Bengal[25]28 12011/88/98-BCC 6 December 1999

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Marwari at Ethnologue (17th ed., 2013)
  2. ^ ISO 639-3 Registration Authority Request for New Language Code Element in ISO 639-3. www-01.sil.org. 2014-1-1. Retrieved 2018-05-01.
  3. ^ "Central list of OBCs for the state of Andhra Pradesh" (PDF). National Commission for Backward Classes. Retrieved 15 December 2012. 
  4. ^ "Central list of OBCs for the state of Assam" (PDF). National Commission for Backward Classes. Retrieved 15 December 2012. 
  5. ^ "Central list of OBCs for the state of Bihar" (PDF). National Commission for Backward Classes. Retrieved 15 December 2012. 
  6. ^ "Central list of OBCs for the state of Chandigarh" (PDF). National Commission for Backward Classes. Retrieved 15 December 2012. 
  7. ^ "Central list of OBCs for the state of Chhattisgarh" (PDF). National Commission for Backward Classes. Retrieved 15 December 2012. 
  8. ^ "Central list of OBCs for the state of Daman and Diu" (PDF). National Commission for Backward Classes. Retrieved 15 December 2012. 
  9. ^ "Central list of OBCs for the state of N.C.T. Of Delhi" (PDF). National Commission for Backward Classes. Retrieved 15 December 2012. 
  10. ^ "Central list of OBCs for the state of Goa" (PDF). National Commission for Backward Classes. Retrieved 15 December 2012. 
  11. ^ "Central list of OBCs for the state of Haryana" (PDF). National Commission for Backward Classes. Retrieved 15 December 2012. 
  12. ^ "Central list of OBCs for the state of Jharkhand" (PDF). National Commission for Backward Classes. Retrieved 15 December 2012. 
  13. ^ "Central list of OBCs for the state of Karnataka" (PDF). National Commission for Backward Classes. Retrieved 15 December 2012. 
  14. ^ "Central list of OBCs for the state of Kerala" (PDF). National Commission for Backward Classes. Retrieved 15 December 2012. 
  15. ^ "Central list of OBCs for the state of Madhya Pradesh" (PDF). National Commission for Backward Classes. Retrieved 15 December 2012. 
  16. ^ a b "Central list of OBCs for the state of Maharashtra" (PDF). National Commission for Backward Classes. Retrieved 15 December 2012. 
  17. ^ "Central list of OBCs for the state of Orissa" (PDF). National Commission for Backward Classes. Retrieved 15 December 2012. 
  18. ^ "Central list of OBCs for the state of Punjab" (PDF). National Commission for Backward Classes. Retrieved 15 December 2012. 
  19. ^ "Central list of OBCs for the state of Rajasthan" (PDF). National Commission for Backward Classes. Retrieved 15 December 2012. 
  20. ^ "Central list of OBCs for the state of Sikkim" (PDF). National Commission for Backward Classes. Retrieved 15 December 2012. 
  21. ^ "Central list of OBCs for the state of Tamilnadu" (PDF). National Commission for Backward Classes. Retrieved 15 December 2012. 
  22. ^ "Central list of OBCs for the state of Tripura" (PDF). National Commission for Backward Classes. Retrieved 15 December 2012. 
  23. ^ "Central list of OBCs for the state of Uttar Pradesh" (PDF). National Commission for Backward Classes. Retrieved 15 December 2012. 
  24. ^ "Central list of OBCs for the state of Uttaranchal" (PDF). National Commission for Backward Classes. Retrieved 15 December 2012. 
  25. ^ "Central list of OBCs for the state of West Bengal" (PDF). National Commission for Backward Classes. Retrieved 15 December 2012. 

Further readingEdit