Jasper–Prince Rupert train

The Jasper–Prince Rupert train (formerly the Skeena and Panorama[1], now known as Trains 5/6, sometimes called The Rupert Rocket)[2] is a Canadian passenger train service operated by Via Rail between Jasper, Alberta, Prince George and Prince Rupert in British Columbia.

The Skeena at McBride in 2001

Route historyEdit

In 1911, with station names selected,[3] passenger service was available for the first 100 miles (160 km) eastward from Prince Rupert to Kitselas (formerly called Vanarsdol).[4] Following the arrival of the tracks at Skeena Crossing in March 1912, the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway (GTPR) was offering passenger service from Prince Rupert to Hazelton with a ferry across the Skeena.[5] By 1913, Rose Lake was a temporary terminal station location.[6] In October 1913, the first passenger train arrived at Smithers.[7][8]

 
First passenger train leaves Prince Rupert for Mile 100, June 1911

In September 1912, an Alberta-Tête Jaune weekly passenger service began.[9] In August 1913, the first GTPR passenger arrived at Kidd.[10] From late 1913 to early 1914, immediately west of Dome Creek was a temporary terminal station location.[11] Foley, Welch and Stewart (FW&S), the prime contractors, provided passenger and freight service on completed sections of the line as the railhead advanced. FW&S ran the first such westbound train into Prince George on January 30, 1914.[12] In March 1914, GTPR passenger service coverage comprised Prince Rupert-Priestly,a[13] Prince George-McBride,b[14] and McBride-Edmontond (McBride being an overnight stop).[15] However, the track conditions west of Hansard made the initial service unreliable. The Prince Rupert-Edmonton through service,a which inaugurated that September, took 22–23 hours for Prince Rupert-Prince George, and the same for Prince George-Edmonton[16] (about 11–13 hours for Prince George-Jasper).[15] In following decades, the latter varied little, but the former decreased to 20–22 hours.[17][18] With fewer stops, this is now about 12 hours and 7–9 hours respectively.

Maintaining services, Canadian National Railway (CNR) took over the insolvent GTPR.b[19] From 1922,[20] a summer-month schedule operatedc[21][22] until the end of each halibut season, because the passenger train also carried frozen fish as fast freight.[23] Once regular passenger service ended in 1931, sleeping and dining cars were attached to the three-times-weekly way freight.[24] In addition, from 1934 to 1942, a once or twice weekly summer passenger service[25] operated with limited stops.[26][27][28] When the US Army turned Prince Rupert into a major supply base in early 1942, four or five troop trains arrived daily, carrying 75,000 soldiers bound for Alaska.[29] In 1943, the passenger service permanently expanded.c[30] With wartime demand ending, frequency reduced,b despite protests,[31] for the fish/passenger train,[32] but was restored in 1951c[33] to cater for new industrial developments at Prince Rupert and Kitimat.[34] In 1954, new sleeper and passenger cars were introduced.[35] A way freight ran on the Terrace-Kitimat branch line from January 1955, until replaced by a passenger service June 1955–November 1957.[36][37]

In 1962, although Prince George-Jasper remained unchanged,c Prince Rupert-Prince George frequency reduced,b[38] but restored during the 1965 summer and from the 1966 summer.c[39] In 1968, the whole route cut back,b[40] except for summer on Prince George-Jasper.c[41] Although CN experienced significant losses on the Prince Rupert-Jasper passenger service,[42] an application to discontinue the route was denied in 1972, but CN became eligible for an 80 percent federal subsidy.[43] Sustaining losses of $3.3m (on costs of $4.1m) in 1974 for the 25,000 passengers carried, CN's reapplication to discontinue[44] was again denied.[45] In 1977, Via Rail was launched as a CN subsidiary to gradually take over CN and CP passenger services.[46] Via maintained the CN service levels,b[47] broadening the summer schedule to the whole route.d[48]

From 1981, the lower levels applied year round.b[49] Despite losses of $6.6m in 1988 for the 26,000 passengers carried, safeguarding isolated communities gave the route a reprieve from closure.[50] However, the subsidy of $480 for every passenger carried made the route difficult to justify retaining,[51] and alternatives remained under review.[52]

 
CN Prince Rupert yard in October 1979

After extensive consultation, Via proposed an overnight stop in Prince George and a daylight schedule for the Prince Rupert leg that would enable tourists to enjoy the outstanding scenery.[53] With ridership falling seven percent between 1990 and 1992, and a $9m deficit, the focus switched to possible service cuts and the daytime option was shelved in 1993.[54] Eventually implemented in 1996, the daylight schedule also provided better connections with coastal ferry services and the BC Rail Cariboo Dayliner.[55]

From the 1920s, CN promoted its "Triangle Tour".[56] Rail tour operators such as Rocky Mountaineer have included the train or rails as part of various "circle" itineraries.[57]

^a . Regular passenger service twice weekly each way.
^b . Regular passenger service three times weekly each way.
^c . Regular passenger service six times weekly each way.
^d . Regular passenger service daily each way.

Present timeEdit

 
Jasper station

The train operates three times weekly, departing Jasper on Wednesday, Friday and Sunday. The return-service departs Prince Rupert on the same days of the week. The journey takes two days with an overnight stop at Prince George.

The train offers Economy Class, and twice a week in the summer, Touring Class service. Touring Class provides exclusive access to the Panoramic Dome car and the Park car. When Touring Class is available, Economy Class passengers are restricted from the dome cars; sandwiches, drinks, and other snack items are sold by the attendants at the passenger's seat. Touring Class passengers are served three meals per day in the Panoramic Dome car and staff provide commentary throughout the journey.[58]

The train offers connections at Prince Rupert between the BC Ferries service to Port Hardy and Haida Gwaii, the Alaska Marine Highway service to points in southeast Alaska, and a connection at Jasper to the Via Rail Canadian to Vancouver and Toronto.

Patronage and subsidyEdit

Year Revenue ($000) Costs ($000) Loss ($000) Passengers/year Subsidy/passenger ($) Subsidy/passenger mile ($)
2013 [59] 1,383 11,232 9,849 18,631 528.61 1.55
2014 [60] 1,446 11,138 9,692 17,863 542.56 1.56
2015 [61] 1,495 11,071 9,576 17,365 551.40 1.66
2016 [62] 1,491 09,256 7,765 16,784 462.64 1.35
2017 [63] 1,828 09,676 7,848 18,018 435.56 1.27
2018 [64] 1,500 09,788 8,288 15,956 519.49 1.59
2019 [65] 1,405 09,816 8,411 16,327 515.16 1.62

A significant portion of the traffic on the train originates with a Jasper-based tour that offers a day-time package west to Dunster or east from McBride, with the opposite leg completed by bus.[66]

TimetablesEdit

Effective Jun 2016[67] Oct 2016[68] Jun 2017[69] Oct 2017[70] Jun 2018[71] Nov 2018[72] Current Dec 2019[73]

SceneryEdit

The departure from Jasper takes the train past Moose Lake, before traversing Mount Robson Provincial Park. In the early decades, passengers could alight onto the viewing platform 2.6 miles (4.2 km) west of the station to view Mount Robson.[74] The same was true above Bulkley Gate, near Hazelton.[75][76] This section between Smithers and Terrace features some of the most incredible mountain scenery in the country, and the run east of Prince Rupert offers a picturesque journey beside the Skeena River.[77][78]

Stations/stopsEdit

 
Via Rail Jasper–Prince Rupert (interactive map)
Station/Stop Km. Miles Time
Zone
Regular/
Flag stop
Date Erectedd &
Building Design Plan
History Archit.
Merit
Current Facilities
CN/Via                  Other
Jasper e 0,000 0,000 Mountain terminus 01912 100-155; 1925 100-205 [79] fg Jasper, formerly Fitzhugh listed[80] counter, washrooms[81]
Harvey 0,106 0,066 Pacific flag c.1988 [82] i replaced Tête Jaune[83] none[84]
Dunster 0,142 0,088 flag 01913 100-152 [85] gh [86][87] none[88]            museum
McBride e 0,174 0,108 regular 01913 100-156; 1919 100-167 [89] fg [90] listed[91] none[92]            visitor centre
Goat River 0,217 0,135 flag 01914 100-152; 01953
0110-254 conv. bunkhouse
[93] h formerly Brundall, Rooney none[94]
Loos 0,232 0,144 flag 01914 100-152; ? 100-41 [95] fh formerly Crescent Island none[96]
Dome Creek 0,262 0,163 flag c.1921 i Dome Creek none[97]
Bend 0,265 0,165 flag 01914 100-152 [95] h Bend none[98]
Penny 0,285 0,177 flag c.1917; 1927 conv. tool shed;
01947 100-152
[93] if˸h Penny none[99]
Longworth 0,301 0,187 flag 01914 100-152 [95] h Longworth none[100]
Hutton 0,314 0,195 flag 01914 100-152 [95] h Hutton none[101]
Sinclair Mills 0,319 0,198 flag c.1930 0110-217
0converted bunkhouse
[102] none[103]
McGregor 0,331 0,206 flag c.1959 i McGregor none[104]
Upper Fraser 0,341 0,212 flag c.1941 i Upper Fraser none[105]
Aleza Lake 0,349 0,217 flag 01914 100-152; c.1960 [106] h˸i Aleza Lake none[107]
Willow River 0,378 0,235 flag 01914 100-152 [106] h Willow River none[108]
Prince George e 0,409 0,254 overnight 01913; 1922[109] 100-136;
01970[110] Special
[111] i Prince George[112] counter, washrooms[113]
Vanderhoof 0,520 0,323 regular 01914 100-152; 1924 100-72;
01960 100-345
[114] h [115][116] none[117]
Fort Fraser 0,560 0,348 flag 01916 100-162; 1923 100-72;
c.1971 100-41B
[118] none[119]
Endako e 0,594 0,369 regular 01914; 1922 100-143; 1970
0trailer; 1985 hybrid b'house
[120] i none[121]
Burns Lake 0,650 0,404 regular 01914 100-152; 1952 100-332 [122] h [123] none[124]
Houston 0,734 0,456 regular 01914 100-152; 1920[125]
0100-168; 1971 Special
[126] fh [127] shelter[128]
Telkwa 0,780 0,485 flag 1914 100-162; 1922[125] 100-168 [129] [130][131] none[132]
Smithers e 0,795 0,494 regular 01915;[133] 1919 100-166 [89] gi Smithers listed[134] shelter, washrooms[135]
New Hazelton 0,869 0,540 flag 01913 100-152; 1980 [106] h˸i [136] New Hazelton none[137]
Kitwanga 0,912 0,567 flag 01912 100-152 [95] h [138] none[139]
Cedarvale 0,933 0,580 flag 01912 100-152; 1931 100-41B [140] fh [141] none[142]
Dorreen 0,957 0,595 flag 01913 100-152 [95] h [143] none[144]
Pacific 0,967 0,601 flag 01913 100-155; 1935 100-277 [111] f formerly Nicholl[145][146] none[147]
Usk 0,988 0,614 flag 01912 100-152; ? conv. b'house [93] h [148] none[149]
Terrace e 1,007 0,626 regular 01911 100-152; 1960 100-391 [95] h formerly Littleton[150] shelter, washrooms[151]
Kwinitsa 1,084 0,674 flag 01911 100-152 [95] h [152] building moved[153] none[154]
Cassiar
Cannery
1,136 0,706 flag c.1916[155] i [156] inactive as a stop
c.1990[82][157] to 2016
none[158]
Prince Rupert e 1,160 0,721 terminus 01907 140-210; 1922 100-135 [159] j Prince Rupert listed[160] shelter, washrooms[161]

^d . Stop activation usually preceded station construction by months or longer.
^e . CN divisional point.
^f . Earliest station building destroyed by fire.
^g . Buildings owned and maintained by Parks Canada, Dunster Station Museum, the Village of McBride, and Smithers Community Services Association, respectively.
^h . GTP standard design (Bohi's Type E).
^i . Unspecified design.
^j . Opened in 1907 as the Prince Rupert Inn, the building was converted into a temporary station.


FootnotesEdit

  1. ^ VIA Rail System Timetable. Montreal: VIA Rail Canada. 3 June 1984. pp. 46–47.
  2. ^ "Rupert Rocket". www.rupertrocket.com. Retrieved May 25, 2019.
  3. ^ Fort George Herald, 11 Feb 1911
  4. ^ "The Official Guide, 1912". www.hathitrust.org. p. 94.
  5. ^ "GTPR 100th Anniversary" (PDF). www.rdks.bc.ca.
  6. ^ Waghorn 1913, p. 68.
  7. ^ Prince George Citizen, 2 Jul 1963
  8. ^ Fort George Herald, 25 Oct 1913
  9. ^ Fort George Herald, 7 Sep 1912
  10. ^ Fort George Herald, 30 Aug1913
  11. ^ Waghorn 1913, p. 71.
  12. ^ "This week in history". www.theroadhome.ca.
  13. ^ "Priestly on map". www.google.com.
  14. ^ Fort George Herald, 21 Mar 1914
  15. ^ a b 1914 Timetable. p. 4.
  16. ^ Fort George Herald, 5 Sep 1914
  17. ^ 1920 Timetable: Bulkley Valley Museum collection
  18. ^ "1943 Timetable" (PDF). www.streamlinermemories.info. p. 60.
  19. ^ Prince George Citizen: 4 Jun 1919; 3 Jul 1919; 10 Sep 1919; 29 Oct 1919; 12 & 19 Nov 1919; 31 Dec 1919; 30 Jan 1920; 11 Jun 1920; 9 Nov 1920; 22 Apr 1921; 27 May 1921; 3 Jun 1921; 26 Jul 1921; 28 Oct 1921; & 29 Jan 1931
  20. ^ Prince George Citizen, 9 May 1922
  21. ^ Prince George Leader, 18 Jan 1923
  22. ^ Prince George Citizen: 30 Jan 1923; 12 Jul 1923; 18 Sep 1924; 13 Dec 1923; 2 & 30 Oct 1924; 23 Jul 1925; 18 Oct 1928; & 14 Nov 1929
  23. ^ Prince George Citizen, 21 Nov 1929
  24. ^ Prince George Citizen: 12 & 19 Nov 1931
  25. ^ Prince George Citizen: 7 Jun 1934 & 22 Jun 1939
  26. ^ Prince George Citizen: 29 Jun 1939, 26 Aug 1939 & 5 Jun 1941
  27. ^ 1935 Timetable. p. 60.
  28. ^ 1942 Timetable. p. 58.
  29. ^ MacKay, Donald (1986). The Asian Dream: The Pacific Rim and Canada's National Railway. Douglas & McIntyre. pp. 152–153. ISBN 0-88894-501-9.
  30. ^ Prince George Citizen, 13 May 1943
  31. ^ Prince George Citizen: 27 Dec 1945; & 10 & 24 Jan 1946
  32. ^ Prince George Citizen, 23 Aug 1951
  33. ^ Prince George Citizen: 27 Sep 1951; 27 Mar 1952; 17 Jul 1952; 7 Aug 1952; 16 & 30 Oct 1952; 13 & 24 Nov 1952; 18 Dec 1952; 7 & 20 Apr 1953; 19 May 1953; 22 Jun 1953; 16 & 23 Jul 1953; 13 & 27 Aug 1953; 5, 13 & 19 Oct 1953; 6 Nov 1953; 10 Dec 1953; 24 Feb 1960; 19 Apr 1960; 27 Oct 1960; & 24 Oct 1961
  34. ^ Prince George Citizen: 10 Sep 1951
  35. ^ Prince George Citizen, 3 Jun 1954
  36. ^ "Kitimat's historic CN railway station". www.nwcoastenergynews.com.
  37. ^ Prince George Citizen: 24 May 1955
  38. ^ Prince George Citizen: 17 Sep 1962; 24 Oct 1962; 23 Apr 1963; 20 May 1964; 23 Oct 1964; 21 Apr 1965; 10 & 20 May 1965; 13, 17 & 29 Sep 1965; 26 Oct 1965; 2 Nov 1965; & 18 & 20 Apr 1966
  39. ^ Prince George Citizen: 17, 21, & 24 Jun 1965; 15 & 22 Jun 1966; 26 Oct 1966; & 2 Nov 1966
  40. ^ Prince George Citizen: 24 Apr 1968 & 24 Oct 1969
  41. ^ Prince George Citizen: 12 Sep 1968; 29 Oct 1968; & 21 Apr 1969
  42. ^ Prince George Citizen, 17 Nov 1969
  43. ^ Prince George Citizen, 29 Dec 1972
  44. ^ Prince George Citizen: 6 Apr 1976; 27 May 1976; & 10 & 22 Jun 1976
  45. ^ Prince George Citizen, 23 Mar 1977
  46. ^ Prince George Citizen, 16 & 28 Feb 1977
  47. ^ Prince George Citizen: 30 Apr 1974, 27 Oct 1978 & 26 Oct 1979
  48. ^ Prince George Citizen: 18 Jun 1976 & 18 Jun 1979
  49. ^ Prince George Citizen: 27 Jul 1981 & 1 Jun 1985
  50. ^ Prince George Citizen: 10 Aug 1979, 27 Jul 1981, 1 Jun 1985, 9 Feb 1989, 30 Mar 1989, 26 Jun 1989, 3 Aug 1989 & 5 Oct 1989
  51. ^ Prince George Citizen, 31 Aug 1990
  52. ^ Prince George Citizen, 25 Jul 1992
  53. ^ Prince George Citizen, 24 Apr 1993
  54. ^ Prince George Citizen: 26 Oct 1993 & 27 Apr 1994
  55. ^ Prince George Citizen, 11 Mar 1996
  56. ^ "1927 CN Triangle Tour Map". www.cornell.edu.;
    "1924 CN Triangle Tour Brochure" (PDF). www.streamlinermemories.info.;
    "c.1925 CN Triangle Tour Brochure" (PDF). www.queensu.ca.
  57. ^ Prince George Citizen, 6 Dec 2002
  58. ^ "Jasper-Prince Rupert train – On Board the Train". www.viarail.ca. Retrieved May 25, 2019. Section: Feature
  59. ^ "2013 Annual Report" (PDF). www.viarail.ca. p. 7. Retrieved May 25, 2019.
  60. ^ "2014 Annual Report" (PDF). www.viarail.ca. p. 9. Retrieved May 25, 2019.
  61. ^ "2015 Annual Report" (PDF). www.viarail.ca. p. 9. Retrieved May 25, 2019.
  62. ^ "2016 Annual Report" (PDF). www.viarail.ca. p. 9. Retrieved May 25, 2019.
  63. ^ "2017 Annual Report" (PDF). www.viarail.ca. p. 9. Retrieved May 25, 2019.
  64. ^ "2018 Annual Report" (PDF). www.viarail.ca. p. 9. Retrieved Jun 24, 2019.
  65. ^ "2019 Annual Report" (PDF). www.viarail.ca. p. 9. Retrieved Jul 13, 2020.
  66. ^ "Half day train tours". www jasperadventurecentre.com.
  67. ^ "Jasper - Prince George - Prince Rupert summer 2016 schedule" (PDF). www.viarail.ca.
  68. ^ "Jasper - Prince George - Prince Rupert winter 2016 schedule" (PDF). www.viarail.ca.
  69. ^ "Jasper - Prince George - Prince Rupert summer 2017schedule" (PDF). www.viarail.ca.
  70. ^ "Jasper - Prince George - Prince Rupert winter 2017 schedule" (PDF). www.viarail.ca.
  71. ^ "Jasper - Prince George - Prince Rupert summer 2018 schedule" (PDF). www.viarail.ca.
  72. ^ "Jasper - Prince George - Prince Rupert winter 2018 schedule" (PDF). www.viarail.ca.
  73. ^ "Jasper - Prince George - Prince Rupert summer 2020 schedule" (PDF). www.viarail.ca.
  74. ^ 1922 Timetable. Northern BC Archives. p. 5.
  75. ^ Bowman, Phylis (1980). Whistling Through The West. Self-published. p. 60. ISBN 0969090129.
  76. ^ "3 images: Bulkley Gate". www.bvmuseum.org.
  77. ^ Prince George Citizen: 11 Mar 1996, 7 Aug 1996 & 28 Nov 2011
  78. ^ "The Tyee, 17 Jul 2019". www.thetyee.ca.
  79. ^ Bohi & Kozma 2002, pp. 118, 138 & 142.
  80. ^ "Canada's Historic Places, Jasper". www.historicplaces.ca.
  81. ^ "Jasper station". www.viarail.ca.
  82. ^ a b "1988 Timetable". www.scribd.com. p. 55, but scan p. 52.
  83. ^ "Railway & Railway Towns". www.museevirtuel.ca. pp. 37–51.
  84. ^ "Harvey flag stop". www.viarail.ca.
  85. ^ Bohi & Kozma 2002, pp. 122 & 136.
  86. ^ "Images: Dunster tran station". www.dunsterbc.net.
  87. ^ "Dunster Station Museum". www.dunsterstationmuseum.ca.
  88. ^ "Dunster flag stop". www.viarail.ca.
  89. ^ a b Bohi & Kozma 2002, pp. 122 & 138.
  90. ^ "McBride's heritage railway station". www.visitmcbride.ca.
  91. ^ "Canada's Historic Places, McBride". www.historicplaces.ca.
  92. ^ "McBride station". www.viarail.ca.
  93. ^ a b c Bohi & Kozma 2002, pp. 121, 136 & 141.
  94. ^ "Goat River flag stop". www.viarail.ca.
  95. ^ a b c d e f g h Bohi & Kozma 2002, pp. 121 & 136.
  96. ^ "Loos flag stop". www.viarail.ca.
  97. ^ "Dome Creek flag stop". www.viarail.ca.
  98. ^ "Bend flag stop". www.viarail.ca.
  99. ^ "Penny flag stop". www.viarail.ca.
  100. ^ "Longworth flag stop". www.viarail.ca.
  101. ^ "Hutton flag stop". www.viarail.ca.
  102. ^ Bohi & Kozma 2002, pp. 121 & 141.
  103. ^ "Sinclair Mills flag stop". www.viarail.ca.
  104. ^ "McGregor flag stop". www.viarail.ca.
  105. ^ "Upper Fraser flag stop". www.viarail.ca.
  106. ^ a b c Bohi & Kozma 2002, pp. 121, 136 & 144.
  107. ^ "Aleza Lake flag stop". www.viarail.ca.
  108. ^ "Willow River flag stop". www.viarail.ca.
  109. ^ Prince George Citizen, 14 Mar 1922
  110. ^ Prince George Citizen: 31 Jul 1970 & 23 Nov 1970
  111. ^ a b Bohi & Kozma 2002, pp. 121, 138 & 142.
  112. ^ "Prince George railway station". BC Geographical Names.
  113. ^ "Prince George station". www.viarail.ca.
  114. ^ Bohi & Kozma 2002, pp. 121, 133, 136 & 142.
  115. ^ "Nechako Valley" (PDF). www.cnc.bc.ca.
  116. ^ "Vanderhoof". BC Geographical Names.
  117. ^ "Vanderhoof station". www.viarail.ca.
  118. ^ Bohi & Kozma 2002, pp. 121, 133, 134 & 139.
  119. ^ "Fort Fraser flag stop". www.viarail.ca.
  120. ^ Bohi & Kozma 2002, pp. 121, 138, 142 & 144.
  121. ^ "Endako station". www.viarail.ca.
  122. ^ Bohi & Kozma 2002, pp. 122, 136 & 142.
  123. ^ "Burns Lake historical facts". burnslakelakesdistrictnews.com.
  124. ^ "Burns Lake station". www.viarail.ca.
  125. ^ a b Prince George Citizen, 7 Apr 1922
  126. ^ Bohi & Kozma 2002, pp. 122, 136, 138 & 144.
  127. ^ "Houston: Railway is built". www.houston.ca.
  128. ^ "Houston station". www.viarail.ca.
  129. ^ Bohi & Kozma 2002, pp. 122, 134, 138 & 144.
  130. ^ "Telkwa history". www.gent.ca.
  131. ^ Prince George Citizen: 11 & 18 Feb 1921
  132. ^ "Telkwa flag stop". www.viarail.ca.
  133. ^ "Image: Smithers temporary station". www.bvmuseum.org.
  134. ^ "Canada's Historic Places, Smithers". www.historicplaces.ca.
  135. ^ "Smithers station". www.viarail.ca.
  136. ^ "Hazelton area history". www.gent.ca.
  137. ^ "New Hazelton flag stop". www.viarail.ca.
  138. ^ "Kitwanga history". www.gent.ca.
  139. ^ "KItwanga flag stop". www.viarail.ca.
  140. ^ Bohi & Kozma 2002, pp. 121, 136 & 139.
  141. ^ "Cedarvale-Minskinisht history". www.gent.ca.
  142. ^ "Cedarvale flag stop". www.viarail.ca.
  143. ^ "Dorreen General Store & GTP". www.rdks.bc.ca.
  144. ^ "Dorreen flag stop". www.viarail.ca.
  145. ^ "GTP Map 1911". www.unbc.arcabc.ca.
  146. ^ "Pacific history". www.gent.ca.
  147. ^ "Pacific flag stop". www.viarail.ca.
  148. ^ "Usk history". www.gent.ca.
  149. ^ "Usk flag stop". www.viarail.ca.
  150. ^ "Terrace history". www.gent.ca.
  151. ^ "Terrace station". www.viarail.ca.
  152. ^ "Kwinitsa history". www.gent.ca.
  153. ^ "Kwinitsa Railway Museum, Prince Rupert". www.thenorthernview.com.
  154. ^ "Kwinitsa flag stop". www.viarail.ca.
  155. ^ "1916 Timetable extract" (PDF). www.railwaystationlists.co.uk. p. 9.
  156. ^ "Cassiar Cannery history". www.cassiarcannery.com.
  157. ^ "1996 Timetable" (PDF). www.streamlinermemories.info. p. 40.
  158. ^ "Cassiar Cannery flag stop". www.viarail.ca.
  159. ^ Bohi & Kozma 2002, pp. 122, 138 & 142.
  160. ^ "Canada's Historic Places, Prince Rupert". www.historicplaces.ca.
  161. ^ "Prince Rupert station". www.viarail.ca.


ReferencesEdit