Open main menu

James Hayes Sadler (colonial administrator)

Lieutenant colonel Sir James Hayes Sadler KCMG CB FRGS (11 October 1851–21 April 1922) was a British colonial administrator and governor of Kenya and the Windward Islands.


James Hayes Sadler

Governor of the British East Africa Protectorate
In office
1905–1909
Preceded bySir Donald Stewart
Succeeded bySir Percy Girouard
Governor of the Windward Islands
In office
1909–1914
Preceded bySir Ralph Champneys Williams
Succeeded bySir George Haddon-Smith
Personal details
Born(1851-10-11)11 October 1851
London, England
Died21 April 1922(1922-04-21) (aged 70)
FatherJames Hayes Sadler
AwardsKnight Commander of the Order of St Michael and St George
Military service
RankLieutenant Colonel

Early life and educationEdit

Sadler was born to Colonel Sir James Hayes Sadler and Sophia-Jane Sadler (née Taylor) on 11 October 1851 in London, England.[1] In 1875, he married Rita Annie Smith (1856–1918), and had three sons.[2]

CareerEdit

He rose to the rank of Lieutenant-Colonel in the British Army, with whom he saw service in India.

In 1893 and again from 1893-94, he was Chief political resident of the Persian Gulf (for Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, and the Trucial States). In 1898 he was appointed Consul-General of the British Protectorate on the Somali Coast.[3] In 1902 he left what is now Somaliland to become Commissioner in Uganda, a position he held until 1907.[4]

On 12 December 1905, Sadler was appointed the first governor of the British East African Protectorate, succeeding commissioner Donald William Stewart who died in office on 1 October 1905.[5] In 1909 he was transferred to be Governor and Commander-in-Chief of the Windward Islands and their Dependencies, a post he filled until 1914.[6]

Honours and awardsEdit

After nomination by his father, he became a Fellow of the Royal Geographical Society in December 1901[7], eventually resigning in 1921.[2] He was appointed Companion, Order of the Bath (CB) in the 1902 Coronation Honours, and appointed Knight Commander, Order of St. Michael and St. George (KCMG) in 1907.[2][8]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Burke, Sir Bernard (1863). A Genealogical and Heraldic Dictionary of the Landed Gentry of Great Britain and Ireland. Harrison. p. 1315.
  2. ^ a b c Rich, Paul J. (16 August 2009). Creating the Arabian Gulf: The British Raj and the Invasions of the Gulf. Lexington Books. pp. 230–231. ISBN 978-0-7391-4158-8.
  3. ^ "No. 11028". The Edinburgh Gazette. 4 October 1898. p. 965.
  4. ^ "No. 11380". The Edinburgh Gazette. 7 February 1902. p. 113.
  5. ^ Mungazi, Dickson A. (1999). The Last British Liberals in Africa: Michael Blundell and Garfield Todd. Greenwood Publishing Group. pp. 9, 143. ISBN 978-0-275-96283-8.
  6. ^ "No. 12151". The Edinburgh Gazette. 15 June 1909. p. 646.
  7. ^ "Court circular". The Times (36635). London. 11 December 1901. p. 9.
  8. ^ "No. 11985". The Edinburgh Gazette. 12 November 1907. p. 1192.
Diplomatic posts
Preceded by
Stuart Godfrey
Chief political resident of the Persian Gulf
1893
Succeeded by
James Crawford
Preceded by
James Crawford
Chief political resident of the Persian Gulf
1893–1894
Succeeded by
Frederick Wilson
Preceded by
William Ferris
(Resident)
Consul-General of British Somaliland
(Resident 1897-8)

1898–1901
Succeeded by
Eric Swayne
Government offices
Preceded by
Sir Harry Johnston
Commissioner of Uganda
1902–1906
Succeeded by
Hesketh Bell
Preceded by
Sir Donald Stewart
Governor of the British East Africa Protectorate
1905–1909
Succeeded by
Sir Percy Girouard
Preceded by
Sir Ralph Champneys Williams
Governor of the Windward Islands
1909–1914
Succeeded by
Sir George Haddon-Smith