Jack Duncan-Hughes

John Grant "Jack" Duncan-Hughes MC (1 September 1882 – 13 August 1962) was an Australian politician. He was a member of the Australian House of Representatives for Boothby from 1922 to 1928, of the Australian Senate for South Australia from 1932 to 1938, and of the House of Representatives for Wakefield from 1940 to 1943. He represented three conservative parties throughout his career: the splinter Liberal Party (1922-25), the Nationalist Party (1925-28) and its successor the United Australia Party (1932-38, 1940-43).

Jack Duncan-Hughes

John Duncan-Hughes.jpg
Member of the Australian Parliament
for Boothby
In office
16 December 1922 – 17 November 1928
Preceded byWilliam Story
Succeeded byJohn Price
Senator for South Australia
In office
19 December 1931 – 30 June 1938
Preceded byHarry Kneebone
Member of the Australian Parliament
for Wakefield
In office
21 September 1940 – 21 August 1943
Preceded bySydney McHugh
Succeeded byAlbert Smith
Personal details
Born(1882-09-01)1 September 1882
Watervale, South Australia
Died13 August 1962(1962-08-13) (aged 79)
NationalityAustralian
Political partyLiberal (1922–25)
Nationalist (1925–31)
UAP (1931–43)
Alma mater
ProfessionBarrister

Duncan-Hughes was born at "Hughes Park" near Watervale, South Australia, the son of colonial and state politician Sir John Duncan; his surname was changed to Duncan-Hughes as a child in honour of his great-uncle Sir Walter Watson Hughes. He was educated at St Peters College in Adelaide and Cheltenham College in England and then Trinity College, Cambridge, where he graduated with a Bachelor of Arts (1905), Bachelor of Laws (1906) and Master of Arts (1910). He was admitted to the Bar at the Inner Temple in London in January 1907 and upon returning to Australia was admitted to the South Australian Bar in December 1908. He practised as a solicitor in Adelaide from 1909 until 1914 in partnership with a colleague as Jessop and Duncan Hughes. He was a director of the Wallaroo and Moonta Company and was a member of the state council of the Boy Scouts Association.[1][2][3][4][5][6][7]

In July 1915, Duncan-Hughes left Australia for England with the intention of serving in World War I and was commissioned as a lieutenant in the Royal Field Artillery of the British Army in September 1915. He served in France and Belgium and was awarded both the Military Cross and the Croix de Guerre in 1918. He returned to Australia in July 1919.[8][9][10] He was appointed aide-de-camp to Governor-General of Australia Ronald Munro Ferguson in January 1920 and was attached to the personal staff of the Prince of Wales (the future King Edward VIII) as the representative of the Governor-General on his Australian tour in mid-1920. Duncan-Hughes was promoted to private secretary to the Governor-General in August 1920.[11][12]

In 1922, he was elected to the Australian House of Representatives as the Liberal member for Boothby, defeating sitting Nationalist MP William Story. Duncan-Hughes and his fellow Liberals were running largely on a platform of opposition to Prime Minister Billy Hughes. When Hughes resigned to make way for Stanley Bruce as Prime Minister, the Liberal Party dissolved and its members joined the Nationalists. He held Boothby as a Nationalist until his defeat in 1928. In 1932, he was elected to the Senate as a United Australia Party Senator for South Australia, but retired at the end of that term in 1938.[13] He came out of retirement at the 1940 federal election in an attempt to win back the Wakefield seat after it had been lost to Labor at a by-election following the death of Charles Hawker; he won the seat, but was defeated in 1943 after only one term.[14][15]

During his political career, he also served as the president of the Adelaide Club from 1935 to 1937 and was a board member of the Wyatt Benevolent Institution. He died at his home at Medindie in 1962 and was buried at Penwortham Cemetery.[1][4][16] In 1963, a collection of 5,000 volumes accumulated by Duncan-Hughes was donated to the National Library of Australia.[17]

His brother, Walter Gordon Duncan, was a long-serving member of the South Australian Legislative Council.[18]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b "Former M.H.R. dies in South Australia". The Age. 15 August 1962. Retrieved 26 December 2019.
  2. ^ "NEXT FEDERAL ELECTIONS". Chronicle. South Australia. 29 April 1922. p. 44. Retrieved 26 December 2019 – via Trove.
  3. ^ "NEXT FEDERAL ELECTIONS". Chronicle. South Australia. 29 April 1922. p. 44. Retrieved 26 December 2019 – via Trove.
  4. ^ a b "DUNCAN-HUGHES, John Grant (1882–1962)". The Biographical Dictionary of the Australian Senate. Parliament of Australia. Retrieved 26 December 2019.
  5. ^ "WALLAROO AND MOONTA COMPANY". The Express and Telegraph. South Australia. 28 September 1915. p. 4 (5 O'CLOCK EDITION). Retrieved 26 December 2019 – via Trove.
  6. ^ "BOY SCOUTS' ASSOCIATION". The Advertiser. South Australia. 17 December 1915. p. 13. Retrieved 26 December 2019 – via Trove.
  7. ^ "Advertising". The Advertiser. South Australia. 1 February 1909. p. 2. Retrieved 26 December 2019 – via Trove.
  8. ^ "SOCIAL NOTES". The Journal. South Australia. 31 July 1915. p. 19. Retrieved 26 December 2019 – via Trove.
  9. ^ "Commonwealth Members of Parliament who have served in war: Colonial wars and the First World War". Parliament of Australia. Retrieved 26 December 2019.
  10. ^ "PERSONAL". The Sydney Morning Herald. New South Wales, Australia. 30 July 1919. p. 10. Retrieved 26 December 2019 – via Trove.
  11. ^ "PERSONAL". The Sydney Morning Herald. New South Wales, Australia. 20 August 1920. p. 8. Retrieved 26 December 2019 – via Trove.
  12. ^ "ROYAL VISIT HONOURS". The Register (Adelaide). South Australia. 23 August 1920. p. 7. Retrieved 26 December 2019 – via Trove.
  13. ^ "SENATOR DUNCAN-HUGHES". Chronicle. South Australia. 11 February 1937. p. 40. Retrieved 26 December 2019 – via Trove.
  14. ^ "Clare Men's Branch Liberal and Country League". Northern Argus. South Australia. 11 August 1939. p. 5. Retrieved 26 December 2019 – via Trove.
  15. ^ "Wakefield and Barker Polls Declared". Murray Pioneer. South Australia. 16 September 1943. p. 1. Retrieved 26 December 2019 – via Trove.
  16. ^ Fort, Carol (2008). Keeping a Trust: South Australia's Wyatt Benevolent Institution and Its Founder. Wakefield Press. p. 240.
  17. ^ "LIBRARY TABLES REPORT". The Canberra Times. Australian Capital Territory, Australia. 18 September 1963. p. 8. Retrieved 26 December 2019 – via Trove.
  18. ^ "OUT AMONG THE PEOPLE". The Advertiser (Adelaide). South Australia. 13 February 1940. p. 17. Retrieved 26 December 2019 – via Trove.
Parliament of Australia
Preceded by
William Story
Member for Boothby
1922 – 1928
Succeeded by
John Price
Preceded by
Sydney McHugh
Member for Wakefield
1940 – 1943
Succeeded by
Albert Smith