J. Mordaunt Crook

Joseph Mordaunt Crook, CBE, FBA, FSA (born 27 February 1937),[1] generally known as J. Mordaunt Crook, is an English architectural historian and specialist on the Georgian and Victorian periods. He is an authority on the life and work of the Victorian architect William Burges, his study published in 1981 has been described as "one of the most substantial studies of any Victorian architect".[2].

Joseph Mordaunt Crook

Castle Coch from A470.jpg
Mordaunt Crook's study of William Burges re-established the latter's reputation
Born (1937-02-27) 27 February 1937 (age 82)
London, England
OccupationArchitectural historian
Notable work
William Burges and the High Victorian Dream

Positions and memberships heldEdit

HonoursEdit

Selected worksEdit

  • The History of the King's Works volumes V-VI (1972-6) HMSO[6]
  • The British Museum: a Case-study in Architectural Politics (1972), Pelican[7]
  • The Greek Revival: Neo-Classical Attitudes in British Architecture 1760-1870 (1972/revised 1995) John Murray[7]
  • The Reform Club (1973) article for and published by the Reform Club[8]
  • Strawberry Hill Revisited Reprints from Country Life of 7/14/21 June 1973
  • William Burges and the High Victorian Dream (1981) John Murray; revised (2013) Frances Lincoln
  • The Strange Genius of William Burges (1981) National Museum of Wales
  • Axel Haig and the Victorian Vision of the Middle Ages (with C.A. Lennox-Boyd) (1984) George Allen & Unwin[9]
  • John Carter and the Mind of the Gothic Revival (1985) Society of Antiquaries of London, Occasional Papers
  • The Dilemma of Style: Architectural Ideas from the Picturesque to the Post-Modern (1989) John Murray
  • The Rise of the Nouveaux Riches: Style and Status in Victorian and Edwardian Architecture (1999) John Murray[10]
  • London's Arcadia: John Nash and the Planning of Regent's Park (date of publication and publisher unknown)
  • The Architect's Secret: Victorian Critics and the Image of Gravity (2003) John Murray
  • Brasenose: The Biography of an Oxford College (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2008)[11]
  • Brooks's 1764-2014: The Story of a Whig Club (Edited with Charles Sebag-Montefiore) London: Paul Holberton, 2013[12]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ CROOK, Prof. Joseph Mordaunt. In Who's Who 2012. London: A & C Black, 2012. Online ed., Oxford: OUP, 2011. Online ed., November 2011 - accessed 5 January 2012
  2. ^ "Joseph Mordaunt Crook - Oxford Reference". www.oxfordreference.com. doi:10.1093/oi/authority.20110803095649205. Retrieved 26 March 2019.
  3. ^ "E-Bulletin: University of Leicester". www.le.ac.uk. Retrieved 26 March 2019.
  4. ^ "Alice Davis Hitchcock Medallion". SAHGB. Retrieved 26 March 2019.
  5. ^ "Professor Joseph Mordaunt Crook". The British Academy. Retrieved 6 December 2018.
  6. ^ "Search - Library - The history of the King's works / general editor, H.M. Colvin. Vol.5, 1660-1782 / H.M. Colvin, J. Mordaunt Crook, Kerry Downes, John Newman. - Shakespeare Birthplace Trust". collections.shakespeare.org.uk. Retrieved 26 March 2019.
  7. ^ a b "Joseph Mordaunt Crook - Oxford Reference". www.oxfordreference.com. doi:10.1093/oi/authority.20110803095649205. Retrieved 6 December 2018.
  8. ^ Thevoz 2018, p. 236.
  9. ^ "Crook, J. Mordaunt (Joseph Mordaunt) 1937-". Worldcat. Retrieved 26 March 2019.
  10. ^ "Wednesday Book: A good deal of taste, all of it bad". The Independent. 26 May 1999. Retrieved 26 March 2019.
  11. ^ "A concise history of Brasenose - Brasenose College, Oxford". www.bnc.ox.ac.uk. Retrieved 26 March 2019.
  12. ^ "Where the Whigs went". The Spectator. 25 January 2014. Retrieved 26 March 2019.

SourcesEdit