Inanch Bilge khan

Inanch khan (Chinese: 亦難赤汗; pinyin: Yìnánchì Hàn)[1] or Inanch Bilge[2] Bogü khan (Chinese: 亦難赤必樂格卜古汗; pinyin: Yìnánchì Bìlègé Bogǔ Hàn)[3] or Inat khan[4] was a khan of Naimans. According to Gumilev, his Christian name was John.[5]

Inanch Bilge khan
亦難赤必樂格汗
Khan of Naimans
Reignc. 1143–1198
PredecessorNaershi Tayang (纳儿黑失太阳)
SuccessorTaibuqa (near Lake Zaysan)
Buyruq khan (in Altai)
Died1198 or 1202
SpouseJuerbiesu (古兒別速)
IssueTaibuqa
Buyruq khan
ClanGüčügüt
ReligionNestorianism
Naimans and neighbours during reign of Inanch khan (in middle)

ReignEdit

He was from the Güčügüt clan of Naimans which followed the Betegin clan.[6] He conquered Yenisei Kyrgyz with his elder brother Naershi Tayang (納兒黑失太陽) and succeeded him later sometime.[4] After Yelü Dashi's death 1143, he became independent.[5] He supported Kerait ruler Toghril's brother Erke Qara against him in 1174.[7]

After his death Naiman khanate were divided into two factions ruled by his sons.

FamilyEdit

He was married to Juerbiesu (古兒別速) and several other wives with whom he had at least two sons:

Juerbiesu later married to his step-son Taibuqa in a levirate marriage.[8]

CharacterEdit

He was reported be a man of honor among Naimans according to The Secret History of the Mongols.[2]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ The Secret History of the Mongols, §151
  2. ^ a b The Secret History of the Mongols, §191
  3. ^ Zeki Velidi Togan, Çengiz Han (1155-1227), Istanbul 1969, pp.30-36 (in Turkish)
  4. ^ a b طبيب, رشيد الدين (1952). Jami al Tawarikh (in Russian). Moscow: The Academy of Sciences of the USSR. pp. 135–136. OCLC 81863000.
  5. ^ a b Nikolaevič, Gumilëv, Lev (2003). Poiski vymyšlennogo carstva : legenda o "gosudarstve presvitera Ioanna". Moskva: Ajris Press. ISBN 978-5811200214. OCLC 837888637.
  6. ^ Franke, Herbert; Pelliot, Paul; Hambis, Louis (1952-07-31). "Histoire des Campagnes de Gengis Khan (Cheng-wou Ts'in-tcheng Lou). Tome I". Oriens. 5 (1): 132. doi:10.2307/1579356. ISSN 0078-6527. JSTOR 1579356.
  7. ^ Togan, İsenbike (1998-01-01). Flexibility and Limitation in Steppe Formations: The Kerait Khanate and Chinggis Khan. BRILL. p. 73. ISBN 978-9004108028.
  8. ^ F., Broadbridge, Anne (2018-07-18). Women and the making of the Mongol Empire. Cambridge. p. 90. ISBN 9781108424899. OCLC 1022078179.