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Horseshoe Island (Antarctica)

Horseshoe Island is an island 12 km (6.5 nmi) long and 6 km (3 nmi) wide occupying most of the entrance to Square Bay, along the west coast of Graham Land, Antarctica. It was discovered and named by the British Graham Land Expedition under John Rymill who mapped the area by land and from the air in 1936–37. Its name is indicative of the crescentic alignment of the 600 to 900 m (2,000 to 3,000 ft) peaks which give a comparable shape to the island.[1]

Horseshoe Island
Base Y (Marguerite Bay).jpg
Base Y (Marguerite Bay) on Horseshoe Island with Mount Searle in the background
Horseshoe Island is located in Antarctica
Horseshoe Island
Horseshoe Island
Location in Antarctica
Geography
LocationAntarctica
Coordinates67°51′S 67°12′W / 67.850°S 67.200°W / -67.850; -67.200Coordinates: 67°51′S 67°12′W / 67.850°S 67.200°W / -67.850; -67.200
Administration
Administered under the Antarctic Treaty System

Station YEdit

Lying at the north-western end of the island is Station Y, also known as Horseshoe Base, an inactive but relatively unaltered and completely equipped British research station of the late 1950s. It includes ‘Blaiklock’, a nearby refuge hut. The site has been designated a Historic Site or Monument (HSM 63), following a proposal by the United Kingdom to the Antarctic Treaty Consultative Meeting.[2]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Horseshoe Island". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. Retrieved 2012-06-27.
  2. ^ "List of Historic Sites and Monuments approved by the ATCM (2012)" (PDF). Antarctic Treaty Secretariat. 2012. Retrieved 2014-01-04.

  This article incorporates public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document "Horseshoe Island" (content from the Geographic Names Information System).

External linksEdit

  Media related to Horseshoe Island at Wikimedia Commons