Henry Turner Irving

Sir Henry Turner Irving, GCMG (1833–1923) was a British Civil Servant and Colonial Administrator. He first served as acting Governor of British Ceylon.[1] In 1873–1874, he served as Governor of the Leeward Islands. In 1874–1880, he served as Governor of Trinidad and Tobago. In 1882–1887, he served as Governor of British Guiana.

Sir

Henry Turner Irving

Acting Governor of British Ceylon
In office
4 January 1872 – 4 March 1872
MonarchQueen Victoria
Preceded byHercules Robinson
Succeeded byWilliam Henry Gregory
Governor of Trinidad
In office
1874–1880
Preceded byJohn Scott Bushe (acting)
Succeeded byJohn Scott Bushe (acting)
Personal details
Born1833
Died1923

He was the first Governor of Trinidad to occupy the Government House, now known as the President's House.[2]

He entered the Colonial Office as a clerk in 1854. In 1858, while at the Colonial Office, he served as a special messenger to William Ewart Gladstone who was then the Lord High Commissioner of the Ionian Islands. He then was appointed private secretary to the Permanent Under-Secretary, Sir Frederic Rogers in 1862. In 1865, he was selected to accompany the Governor of Jamaica, John Peter Grant, as Colonial Secretary of that colony.[3]

He married Emma Patty Johnson née Barclay (widow) on 24 June 1884. Lady Irving died in 1903. The couple had no children.[4]

Government offices
Preceded by
Hercules Robinson
Acting
Governor of Ceylon

1872
Succeeded by
William Henry Gregory
Preceded by
Sir Benjamin Pine
Governor of the Leeward Islands
1873–1874
Succeeded by
George Berkeley
Preceded by
John Scott Bushe (acting)
Governor of Trinidad
1874–1880
Succeeded by
John Scott Bushe (acting)
Preceded by
Sir William Young
Governor of British Guiana
1882–1887
Succeeded by
Charles Bruce

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Sri Lanka". Rulers.org. Retrieved 20 June 2013.
  2. ^ "Governors of Trinidad and Tobago: 1866-1891". Retrieved 8 September 2015.[permanent dead link]
  3. ^ "Long and Worthy Colonial Career Ended by Death". The Montreal Gazette. Montreal. December 19, 1923. Archived from the original on 2004. Retrieved 8 September 2015.
  4. ^ "Long and Worthy Colonial Career Ended by Death". The Montreal Gazette. Montreal. December 19, 1923. Archived from the original on 2004. Retrieved 8 September 2015.

External linksEdit