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The Greater Magaric languages are a branch of Sino-Tibetan languages proposed by Nicolas Schorer (2016). Schorer (2016: 286-287) considers Greater Magaric to be closely related to the Kiranti languages as part of a greater Himalayish branch, and does not consider Himalayish to be particularly closely related to the Tibetic languages, which include Tibetan and the Tamangic languages.

Greater Magaric
Geographic
distribution
Nepal
Linguistic classificationSino-Tibetan
Subdivisions
Glottologkham1285[1]

Matisoff (2015: xxxii, 1123-1127), in the final print release of the Sino-Tibetan Etymological Dictionary and Thesaurus (STEDT), has also proposed a Kham-Magar-Chepang language group.[2][3]

ClassificationEdit

Schorer (2016:293)[4]classifies the Greater Magaric languages as follows.

Greater Magaric

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin, eds. (2017). "Kham-Magar-Chepang". Glottolog 3.0. Jena, Germany: Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History.
  2. ^ Matisoff, James A. 2015. The Sino-Tibetan Etymological Dictionary and Thesaurus. Berkeley: University of California. (PDF)
  3. ^ Bruhn, Daniel; Lowe, John; Mortensen, David; Yu, Dominic (2015). Sino-Tibetan Etymological Dictionary and Thesaurus Database Software. Software, UC Berkeley Dash. doi:10.6078/D1159Q
  4. ^ Schorer, Nicolas. 2016. The Dura Language: Grammar and Phylogeny. Leiden: Brill.
  • Schorer, Nicolas. 2016. The Dura Language: Grammar and Phylogeny. Leiden: Brill.

Further readingEdit

  • Watters, David E. 2003. Some preliminary observations on the relationship between Kham, Magar, (and Chepang). SIL International Language and Culture Archives.