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The Grammy Award for Best Rock Album is an award presented at the Grammy Awards, a ceremony that was established in 1958 and originally called the Gramophone Awards,[1] to recording artists for quality albums in the rock music genre. Honors in several categories are presented at the ceremony annually by The Recording Academy of the United States to "honor artistic achievement, technical proficiency and overall excellence in the recording industry, without regard to album sales or chart position".[2]

Grammy Award for Best Rock Album
Awarded forQuality albums in the rock music genre
CountryUnited States
Presented byThe Recording Academy
First awarded1995
Currently held byGreta Van Fleet, From the Fires (2019)
Websitegrammy.com

The award for Best Rock Album was first presented to the band The Rolling Stones in 1995, and the name of the category has remained unchanged since then. According to the category description guide for the 52nd Grammy Awards, the award is presented to "vocal or instrumental rock, hard rock or metal albums containing at least 51% playing time of newly recorded material".[3] Since 1996, award recipients have often included the producers, engineers, and/or mixers associated with the nominated work in addition to the recording artists.

The band Foo Fighters holds the record for the most wins in this category, with four. Two-time winners include Sheryl Crow, Green Day, U2, and Muse. Foo Fighters and Neil Young hold the record for the most nominations, with six. Young also holds the record for the most nominations without a win.

Contents

RecipientsEdit

 
Two-time award-winning band Muse
 
Two-time award winner Sheryl Crow
 
Carlos Santana of the 2000 award-winning band Santana
 
Four-time award-winning band Foo Fighters
 
Two-time award-winning band U2, performing during the Joshua Tree Tour 2017
 
2003 award winner Bruce Springsteen, performing in 2008
 
Chris Martin of the 2009 award-winning band Coldplay
Year[I] Performing artist(s) Work Nominees Ref.
1995 The Rolling Stones Voodoo Lounge [4]
1996 Alanis Morissette Jagged Little Pill [5]
1997 Sheryl Crow Sheryl Crow [6]
1998 John Fogerty Blue Moon Swamp [7]
1999 Sheryl Crow The Globe Sessions [8]
2000 Santana Supernatural [9]
2001 Foo Fighters There Is Nothing Left to Lose [10]
2002 U2 All That You Can't Leave Behind [11]
2003 Bruce Springsteen The Rising [12]
2004 Foo Fighters One by One [13]
2005 Green Day American Idiot [14]
2006 U2 How to Dismantle an Atomic Bomb [15]
2007 Red Hot Chili Peppers Stadium Arcadium [16]
2008 Foo Fighters Echoes, Silence, Patience & Grace [17]
2009 Coldplay Viva la Vida or Death and All His Friends [18]
2010 Green Day 21st Century Breakdown [19]
2011 Muse The Resistance [20]
2012 Foo Fighters Wasting Light [21]
2013 The Black Keys El Camino [22]
2014 Led Zeppelin Celebration Day [23]

2015 Beck Morning Phase [24]

2016 Muse Drones [24]

2017 Cage the Elephant Tell Me I'm Pretty [25]
2018 The War on Drugs A Deeper Understanding [26]
2019 Greta Van Fleet From the Fires

[27]

^[I] Each year is linked to the article about the Grammy Awards held that year.

Artists with multiple winsEdit

Artists with multiple nominationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

General

  • "Past Winners Search". National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences. Retrieved March 4, 2011. Note: User must select the "Rock" category as the genre under the search feature.
  • "Grammy Awards: Best Rock Album". Rock on the Net. Retrieved July 12, 2010.

Specific

  1. ^ "Grammy Awards at a Glance". Los Angeles Times. Tribune Company. Archived from the original on March 9, 2012. Retrieved April 24, 2010.
  2. ^ "Overview". National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences. Archived from the original on October 27, 2009. Retrieved April 24, 2010.
  3. ^ "52nd OEP Category Description Guide" (PDF). National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences. p. 2. Archived from the original (PDF) on October 27, 2009. Retrieved July 12, 2010.
  4. ^ "The 37th Grammy Nominations". Los Angeles Times. Tribune Company. January 6, 1995. p. 3. Archived from the original on October 28, 2014. Retrieved July 12, 2010.
  5. ^ "List of Grammy nominees". CNN. January 4, 1996. Archived from the original on December 7, 2012. Retrieved July 12, 2010.
  6. ^ Campbell, Mary (January 8, 1997). "Babyface is up for 12 Grammy awards". Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. Retrieved July 12, 2010.[permanent dead link]
  7. ^ Campbell, Mary (January 7, 1998). "Rock veterans Dylan, McCartney face off for album of year". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Block Communications. Archived from the original on December 5, 2012. Retrieved July 12, 2010.
  8. ^ "1999 Grammy Nominees". NME. IPC Media. November 27, 1998. Archived from the original on October 11, 2012. Retrieved July 12, 2010.
  9. ^ "42nd Annual Grammy Awards nominations". CNN. January 4, 2000. Archived from the original on July 22, 2012. Retrieved July 12, 2010.
  10. ^ "43rd Grammy Awards". CNN. February 21, 2001. Archived from the original on November 6, 2008. Retrieved July 12, 2010.
  11. ^ "Complete List Of Grammy Nominees". CBS News. January 4, 2002. Archived from the original on October 10, 2003. Retrieved July 12, 2010.
  12. ^ "Grammy nominees and winners". CNN. 24 February 2003. Retrieved 4 July 2019.
  13. ^ "They're All Contenders". The New York Times. The New York Times Company. December 5, 2003. Archived from the original on March 5, 2016. Retrieved July 12, 2010.
  14. ^ "Grammy Award nominees in top categories". USA Today. Gannett Company. February 7, 2005. Archived from the original on June 28, 2011. Retrieved July 12, 2010.
  15. ^ "The Complete List of Grammy Nominations". The New York Times. The New York Times Company. December 8, 2005. p. 1. Archived from the original on May 3, 2015. Retrieved July 12, 2010.
  16. ^ "49th Annual Grammy Awards Winners List". National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences. Archived from the original on December 20, 2006. Retrieved July 12, 2010.
  17. ^ "Grammy 2008 Winners List". MTV. February 10, 2008. Archived from the original on June 5, 2009. Retrieved July 12, 2010.
  18. ^ "Grammy 2009 Winners List". MTV. February 8, 2009. Archived from the original on October 1, 2010. Retrieved July 12, 2010.
  19. ^ "The 52nd Annual Grammy Awards Nominees List". National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences. Archived from the original on June 18, 2010. Retrieved July 12, 2010.
  20. ^ "53rd Annual Grammy Awards nominees list". Los Angeles Times. Tribune Company. Archived from the original on July 13, 2011. Retrieved December 2, 2010.
  21. ^ "2011 – 54th Annual GRAMMY Awards Nominees And Winners: Pop Field". The Recording Academy. November 30, 2011. Archived from the original on December 3, 2011. Retrieved April 26, 2017.
  22. ^ "Grammys 2013: Winners List". Billboard. Archived from the original on June 29, 2013. Retrieved April 26, 2017.
  23. ^ "56th Annual GRAMMY Awards Nominees". Grammy Awards. Archived from the original on November 9, 2016. Retrieved December 7, 2013.
  24. ^ a b "57th Grammy Nominees". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on November 13, 2015. Retrieved December 5, 2014.
  25. ^ "59th Grammy Nominees". Grammy. Archived from the original on February 1, 2012. Retrieved December 6, 2016.
  26. ^ "60th Grammy Nominees". Grammy.com. Archived from the original on 28 November 2017. Retrieved 28 November 2017.
  27. ^ "Grammy.com, 7 December 2018". Archived from the original on 7 December 2018. Retrieved 14 December 2018.

External linksEdit