Open main menu

Australian Sevens

  (Redirected from Gold Coast Sevens)

The Australia Sevens is an international rugby sevens tournament that was first played in 1986. Currently hosted as the Sydney Sevens, the event is part of the Sevens World Series.[1] The tournament was held in Brisbane, in Adelaide, and on the Gold Coast in previous seasons.

Australian Sevens
Sydney Sevens logo.png
Sydney Sevens logo for 2016
SportRugby sevens
Inaugural season1986  (Sydney)
No. of teams16
Most recent
champion(s)
 Australia
Most titles New Zealand  (6 times)

Contents

HistoryEdit

The NSW Rugby Union hosted an international sevens tournament at Concord Oval in Sydney from 1986 to 1988, as part of Australia's Bicentennial celebrations. The Australian Rugby Union continued the event for a further year in 1989.[2]

The 2000 Brisbane Sevens was the first Australian Sevens tournament in the World Sevens Series run by the International Rugby Board (IRB). It was the 7th tournament of the series in the inaugural 1999-2000 season and was hosted at Lang Park. Fiji played Australia in the final, and won the match in the dying seconds, thanks to a brilliant try to Waisale Serevi.[3] Brisbane's hosting rights for 2001 were withdrawn by the IRB because of the Australian Federal Government's sporting boycott of Fiji,[4] imposed after the 2000 Fijian coup d'état.[5] After sanctions were lifted later in 2001,[6] the remaining two tournaments of Brisbane's four year hosting agreement were played and won by Australia and England in 2002 and 2003 respectively.[7][8] Australia was not awarded a World Sevens tournament for the next three years.

Adelaide secured the hosting rights for the 2006/07 season. The 2007 Adelaide Sevens took place in April of that year, replacing the Singapore Sevens in the calendar.[9] The tournament was hosted at Adelaide Oval for five seasons, with the last edition of the Adelaide Sevens being held in 2011.

 
Logo of the
Gold Coast 7s

In April 2011, the Australian Rugby Union announced that the Australian leg of the Sevens World Series would be played at Skilled Park on the Gold Coast for at least the next four years.[10] The tournament was scheduled for the early part of the 2011/12 season, which meant that two World Sevens events were played in Australia in 2011. The Gold Coast tournament was initially named the "International Rugby Sevens Gold Coast",[10] but was later rebranded as the Gold Coast Sevens.[11]

The Gold Coast attendances for the 2013 and 2014 events were lower than expected,[12][13] and in March 2015 the ARU announced that Sydney would host the event for the next four years from the 2015–16 season.[13][14]

ResultsEdit

  A blue box around the year indicates tournaments included in the World Rugby Sevens Series.

SydneyEdit

Year  Venue  Cup final Placings Refs
Winner Score Runner-up Plate Bowl Shield
1986
Concord Oval  
New Zealand
32–0  
Australia
  
Argentina
 
Wales
n/a [15][16]
1987
Concord Oval  
Australia
22–10  
New Zealand
 
South Korea
 
Fiji
 
Western Samoa
[17]
1988
Concord Oval  
New Zealand
22–12  
Scotland
 
Fiji
 
Australia
 
Spain
[18]
1989
Concord Oval  
New Zealand
26–16  
Western Samoa
 
Australia
 
Fiji
n/a [19][20]

Brisbane SevensEdit

Year  Venue  Cup final Placings Refs
Winner Score Runner-up Plate Bowl Shield
1999/00
Details
Lang Park  
Fiji
24–21  
Australia
 
Argentina
 
Tonga
n/a [21]
2000/01
Details
Tournament cancelled by IRB in response to the Australian Government's sporting sanctions against Fiji. [4]
2001/02
Details
Ballymore  
Australia
28–0  
New Zealand
 
Fiji
 
Cook Islands
 
Canada
2002/03
Details
Ballymore  
England
28–14  
Fiji
 
Australia
 
Tonga
 
Cook Islands

Adelaide SevensEdit

Year  Venue  Cup final Placings Refs
Winner Score Runner-up Plate Bowl Shield
2006/07
Details
Adelaide Oval  
Fiji
21–7  
Samoa
 
Australia
 
Wales
 
Canada
2007/08
Details
Adelaide Oval  
South Africa
15–7  
New Zealand
 
Tonga
 
Argentina
 
Wales
2008/09
Details
Adelaide Oval  
South Africa
26–7  
Kenya
 
England
 
Samoa
 
United States
2009/10
Details
Adelaide Oval  
Samoa
38–10  
United States
 
New Zealand
 
England
 
Japan
2010/11
Details
Adelaide Oval  
New Zealand
28–20  
South Africa
 
Wales
 
United States
 
Japan

Gold Coast SevensEdit

Year  Venue  Cup final Placings Refs
Winner Score Runner-up Plate Bowl Shield
2011/12
Details
Robina Stadium  
Fiji
26–12  
New Zealand
 
Wales
 
Argentina
 
Papua New Guinea
2012/13
Details
Robina Stadium  
Fiji
32–14  
New Zealand
 
Argentina
 
Spain
 
Scotland
2013/14
Details
Robina Stadium  
New Zealand
40–19  
Australia
 
Fiji
 
France
 
United States
2014/15
Details
Robina Stadium  
Fiji
31–24  
Samoa
 
New Zealand
 
France
 
Canada

Sydney SevensEdit

Year  Venue  Cup final Placings Refs
Winner Score Runner-up Plate Bowl Shield
2015/16
Details
Sydney Football Stadium  
New Zealand
27–24  
Australia
 
Argentina
 
Canada
 
Wales
Winner Score Runner-up Third Fourth Challenge Trophy
2016/17
Details
Sydney Football Stadium  
South Africa
29–14  
England
 
New Zealand
 
Australia
 
Russia
2017/18
Details
Sydney Football Stadium  
Australia
29–0  
South Africa
 
Argentina
 
United States
 
France

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Sydney takes over from Gold Coast as Sevens host". The Roar. Retrieved 9 March 2015.
  2. ^ Sydney 1986–. Rugby 7.
  3. ^ "Brisbane Sevens draw". espnscrum.com. 16 January 2002. Archived from the original on 8 December 2013. Retrieved 7 December 2013.
  4. ^ a b Funnell, Camille (15 January 2001). "Australia misses out on hosting World Rugby Sevens tournament". abc.net.au. Archived from the original on 7 December 2013. Retrieved 7 December 2013.
  5. ^ Bormann, Trevor (18 July 2000). "Australia places 'smart' sanctions on Fiji". abc.net.au. Archived from the original on 29 September 2004. Retrieved 7 December 2013.
  6. ^ Downer, Alexander (5 October 2001). "Sanctions Against Fiji are Lifted" (Press release). Australian Minister for Foreign Affairs. Archived from the original on 11 October 2014. Retrieved 7 December 2013.
  7. ^ "IRB Sevens III - Brisbane, Australia. 3/2/2002 - 3/3/2002". rugby7.com. 2002. Archived from the original on 12 December 2013. Retrieved 12 December 2013.
  8. ^ "IRB Sevens IV - Brisbane, Australia. 2/1/2003 - 3/1/2003". rugby7.com. 2003. Archived from the original on 12 December 2013. Retrieved 12 December 2013.
  9. ^ "Adelaide Sevens" (Press release). rugby.com.au. Archived from the original on 29 April 2007. Retrieved 2007-04-07.
  10. ^ a b "Gold Coast to Become New Home for Australian Sevens" (Press release). Australian Rugby Union. 13 April 2011. Archived from the original on 11 October 2011. Retrieved 27 April 2011.
  11. ^ "Gold Coast Sevens". Australian Rugby Union. Archived from the original on 6 August 2011. Retrieved 29 August 2011.
  12. ^ Tucker, Jim (13 October 2013). "ARU boss Bill Pulver considers switching Gold Coast Sevens to Brisbane or Sydney after poor crowds". The Courier Mail. Archived from the original on 7 December 2013. Retrieved 7 December 2013.
  13. ^ a b "Sevens World Series moves to Sydney in 2015-16 season". The Sydney Morning Herald. 9 March 2015. Archived from the original on 9 March 2015. Retrieved 9 March 2015.
  14. ^ "HSBC partners with World Rugby for record-breaking sevens properties". Australian Rugby. 30 June 2015. Archived from the original on 30 June 2015. Retrieved 30 June 2015.
  15. ^ Hagerty, Ed (April 1986). "All Blacks: World 7s Champs" (PDF). Rugby. New York. pp. 6–10. Archived (PDF) from the original on 26 May 2017. Retrieved 26 May 2017.
  16. ^ "Annual Report" (PDF 2.3 MB). Australian Rugby. 1986. pp. 7–8. Archived (PDF) from the original on 30 March 2016. Retrieved 6 August 2016.
  17. ^ "Annual Report" (PDF). Australian Rugby. 1987. p. 7. Archived from the original on 30 March 2016. Retrieved 6 August 2016.
  18. ^ "Annual Report" (PDF 2.3 MB). Australian Rugby. 1988. p. 7. Archived (PDF) from the original on 30 March 2016. Retrieved 6 August 2016.
  19. ^ "Gardner comeback in Sevens". The Sydney Morning Herald. 15 March 1989. Archived from the original on 9 July 2016. Retrieved 9 July 2016.
  20. ^ "Annual Report" (PDF 2.9 MB). Australian Rugby. 1989. p. 12. Archived (PDF) from the original on 30 March 2016. Retrieved 6 August 2016.
  21. ^ "Sevens loss no disgrace". Illawarra Mercury. Fairfax. 21 February 2000. p. 34. Archived from the original on 27 May 2016. Retrieved 27 May 2016.

External linksEdit