MacMillan Center for International and Area Studies

The Whitney and Betty MacMillan Center for International and Area Studies at Yale, commonly known as the MacMillan Center, is a research and educational center for international affairs and area studies at Yale University.

Luce Hall, the MacMillan Center's main building.

AcademicsEdit

As of 2021, the Macmillan Center currently offers degrees for both undergraduate and graduate levels. Undergraduate degrees include African Studies, East Asian Studies, Latin American Studies, Modern Middle East Studies, Russian and East European Studies, and South Asian Studies. Graduate degrees offered at the center include African Studies, East Asian Studies, and European and Russian Studies.[1]

Similarly, it is possible for graduating students to partake in a joint-degree program, where they can receive a master's. and an equivalent professional degree from one of four partnered Yale professional schools, with those being the Law School, the School of Management, the School of Public Health, and the School of the Environment.[2]

It is also possible for those to pursue a graduate certificate of concentration through the Councils on African, European, Latin American and Iberian, or Middle East Studies in conjunction with graduate-degree programs at the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences or the professional schools.[3]

HistoryEdit

The MacMillan Center was created in the 1960s as the Concilium on International and Area Studies and later renamed in the 1980s as the Yale Center for International and Area Studies (YCIAS).[4] In April 2006, YCIAS was renamed as The Whitney and Betty MacMillan Center for International and Area Studies at Yale.[5][6][dead link] As of 2021, the center is currently chaired by Dirk Bergemann, Douglass and Marion Campbell Professor of Economics at Yale University.[7]

Jackson Institute for Global AffairsEdit

In April 2009, Yale announced it had received a $50 million gift to create the Jackson Institute for Global Affairs as a part of the MacMillan Center.[8] The institute opened during the 2010 fall semester and, as of 2021, offers an undergraduate major in Global Affairs, a Master of Arts in Global Affairs, a one year Master of Advanced Studies in Global Affairs for mid-career professionals, and a Multidisciplinary Academic Program (MAP) for Global Health Studies.[9] The Jackson Institute began operating separately from the Macmillan Center in July 2015[10] and is planned to become a professional school by 2022.[11]

Affiliated centers and institutesEdit

Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance, and AbolitionEdit

The Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance and Abolition was founded in November 1998 by David Brion Davis and funded by Richard Gilder and Lewis Lehrman, founders of the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History.[12] Davis served as director till June 2004,[13] when historian David. W. Blight, Sterling Professor of American History at Yale University, succeeded him as current director as of 2021.[14]

The center's mission is to promote the study of all aspects of slavery and its legacy, with focus on the chattel slave system and its destruction. The center seeks to foster an improved understanding of the role of slavery, slave resistance, and abolition in the Western world by promoting interaction and exchange between scholars, teachers, and public historians through publications, educational outreach, and other programs and events.[15] In addition, the center offers postdoctoral and faculty fellowships and summer graduate research fellowships, and also sponsors the Frederick Douglass Book prize, an award for most outstanding non-fiction book in English on the subject of slavery, resistance, and/or abolition for the year it is given.[16][17]

Center for Historical Enquiry & the Social SciencesEdit

The Center for Historical Enquiry & the Social Sciences provides insight on the interplay between history and the present, focusing on large-scale social transformations and solutions to difficult social crises and problems. The center serves as a bridge between the humanities and social sciences in order to "better understand the world we live in."[18]

Center for the Study of GlobalizationEdit

Founded in 2001, the Center for the Study of Globalization concentrates on issues of global development, financial globalization, multilateral trade, and global public goods, with priority for issues relating to global coordination and cooperation on climate change mitigation and global peace and security.[19]

Center for the Study of Representative InstitutionsEdit

The Yale Center for the Study of Representative Institutions serves as an interdisciplinary pilot program with the intention of developing the study of the theory and practice of representative government in the Anglo-American tradition. It is supported by the Thomas W. Smith fund and the Jack Miller Center's Commercial Republic Initiative, sponsored by the John Templeton Foundation.[20]

Notable alumniEdit

The following alumni received either a B.A., M.A. or a Ph.D. in International Relations. It is to note that the degree has been phased out and replaced by the Masters in Global Affairs in 2013, which is also now provided by the Jackson Institute.[21]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Academic Programs". The MacMillan Center. Yale University. May 20, 2015. Archived from the original on September 28, 2020. Retrieved February 15, 2021.
  2. ^ "Joint Degree Programs". The MacMillan Center. Yale University. June 18, 2015. Archived from the original on September 28, 2020. Retrieved February 15, 2021.
  3. ^ "Graduate Certificate of Concentration". The MacMillan Center. Yale University. June 18, 2015. Archived from the original on September 28, 2020. Retrieved February 15, 2021.
  4. ^ "History of International and Area Studies at Yale | Bulletin of Yale University". bulletin.yale.edu. Retrieved February 15, 2021.
  5. ^ "Yale Center for International and Area Studies Receives New Name". YaleNews. Yale University. April 27, 2006. Retrieved February 15, 2021.
  6. ^ "Yale Center for International and Area Studies receives new name: The Whitney and Betty MacMillan Center for International and Area Studies at Yale". M2 Presswire. April 28, 2006.
  7. ^ "Executive Committee, 2019-2020". The MacMillan Center. Yale University. December 9, 2015. Archived from the original on September 28, 2020. Retrieved February 15, 2021.
  8. ^ Needham, Paul; Zuckerman, Esther (6 April 2009). "Global affairs center created". Yale Daily News. The Yale Daily News Publishing Company. Archived from the original on 16 March 2011. Retrieved 26 August 2011.
  9. ^ "The History". Yale Jackson Institute for Global Affairs. Yale University. Archived from the original on October 28, 2020. Retrieved 2021-02-15.
  10. ^ "History of International and Area Studies at Yale". Bulletin of Yale University. Yale University. Retrieved February 17, 2021.
  11. ^ "The Future of Jackson". Yale Jackson Institute for Global Affairs. Yale University. Archived from the original on November 19, 2020. Retrieved February 15, 2021.
  12. ^ "Gilder Lehrman Center History | The Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance, and Abolition". glc.yale.edu. Yale University. Archived from the original on October 19, 2020. Retrieved February 15, 2021.
  13. ^ "David Blight | Department of African American Studies". afamstudies.yale.edu. Yale University. Archived from the original on December 2, 2020. Retrieved February 15, 2021.
  14. ^ "People | The Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance, and Abolition". glc.yale.edu. Yale University. Archived from the original on February 9, 2021. Retrieved February 15, 2021.
  15. ^ "About Us | The Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance, and Abolition". glc.yale.edu. Yale University. Archived from the original on February 11, 2021. Retrieved February 15, 2021.
  16. ^ "To Apply for the GLC 2020-2021 Fellowships". glc.yale.edu. Yale University. Archived from the original on February 11, 2021. Retrieved February 15, 2021.
  17. ^ "Frederick Douglass Book Prize Submissions". glc.yale.edu. Yale University. Archived from the original on February 11, 2021. Retrieved 2021-02-15.
  18. ^ "Welcome | The Center for Historical Enquiry and the Social Sciences". yalechess.yale.edu. Yale University. Archived from the original on January 28, 2021. Retrieved February 15, 2021.
  19. ^ "About the Center | Yale Center for the Study of Globalization". ycsg.yale.edu. Yale University. Archived from the original on December 6, 2020. Retrieved February 15, 2021.
  20. ^ "Welcome | Yale MacMillan Center - Center for the Study of Representative Institutions". ycri.yale.edu. Yale University. Archived from the original on October 7, 2020. Retrieved February 15, 2021.
  21. ^ "International Relations | Yale University Library". Yale University Library. Archived from the original on October 25, 2020. Retrieved February 15, 2020.
  22. ^ "Eric Alterman". Center for American Progress. Archived from the original on February 26, 2009. Retrieved April 16, 2010.
  23. ^ "A. Doak Barnett". Notable Names Database. Archived from the original on May 10, 2020. Retrieved 2009-10-24.
  24. ^ "The Coca-Cola World Fund at Yale". The MacMillan Center. Archived from the original on March 3, 2016. Retrieved 2009-10-22.
  25. ^ "Staff Biographies". Association for Diplomatic Studies and Training. Archived from the original on 2002-06-17. Retrieved 2010-04-16.
  26. ^ "Randy Charles Epping | Penguin Random House". Penguin Random House. Archived from the original on October 2, 2020. Retrieved February 15, 2021.
  27. ^ "John Simon Guggenheim Foundation | James H. Fowler". John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation. Archived from the original on October 24, 2020. Retrieved 2021-02-15.
  28. ^ "Biography: Morton Halperin". U.S. Department of State. Archived from the original on June 13, 2020. Retrieved February 15, 2020.
  29. ^ "President's Report 2003 | The People | New Faculty | Dr. Peter Hart". Memorial University of Newfoundland. Archived from the original on November 17, 2004. Retrieved February 15, 2020.
  30. ^ Hevesi, Dennis (June 23, 2009). "Heyward Isham, a Negotiator With Hanoi, Dies at 82 (Published 2009)". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on January 27, 2018. Retrieved February 15, 2021.
  31. ^ "Scott Kleeb: Yale history PhD is running for the Senate in Nebraska | History News Network". History News Network. Columbian College of Arts and Sciences. May 15, 2008. Retrieved February 15, 2021.
  32. ^ "Lind, Michael | LBJ School of Public Affairs | The University of Texas at Austin". LBJ School of Public Affairs. Archived from the original on January 7, 2021. Retrieved February 15, 2021.
  33. ^ "Barry Naughton". University of California San Diego. Archived from the original on December 22, 2020. Retrieved February 15, 2021.
  34. ^ Hevesi, Dennis (December 10, 2007). "Richard Nolte, Diplomat Who Got Caught Up in Mideast War, Dies at 86 (Published 2007)". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on April 3, 2019. Retrieved February 15, 2021.
  35. ^ Silver, James (April 1, 2009). "Matthew Parris: Lonely prophet of shampoo Toryism". The Independent. Retrieved February 15, 2021.
  36. ^ "Thomas Palley | The Federalist Society". The Federalist Society. Archived from the original on September 5, 2018. Retrieved February 15, 2021.
  37. ^ "Michael Rothschild | Dean of the Faculty". Princeton University. Archived from the original on December 18, 2020. Retrieved February 15, 2021.
  38. ^ "Pedro Moreira Salles - Creating Emerging Markets - Harvard Business School". Harvard Business School. Archived from the original on October 30, 2020. Retrieved February 15, 2021.
  39. ^ Jordan, Justin (September 30, 2017). "Marcel Theroux: 'Keep the life normal, and keep the work weird'". The Guardian. Archived from the original on November 12, 2020. Retrieved February 15, 2021.
  40. ^ "USC International Relations". University of Southern California. Archived from the original on 2009-11-29. Retrieved 2009-10-22.
  41. ^ "Profile - Sergio Troncoso - The Authors Guild". The Authors Guild. Archived from the original on October 30, 2020. Retrieved 2021-02-15.
  42. ^ "William C. Wohlforth". Dartmouth College. Archived from the original on August 3, 2020. Retrieved February 15, 2021.

External linksEdit

See alsoEdit

Coordinates: 41°18′52″N 72°55′27″W / 41.31437°N 72.92414°W / 41.31437; -72.92414