German School of Tokyo Yokohama

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The German School of Tokyo Yokohama, Japanese: 東京横浜独逸学園, romanizedTōkyō Yokohama Doitsu Gakuen, German: Deutsche Schule Tokyo Yokohama, DSTY is an officially approved German school in Tsuzuki-ku, Yokohama, Japan.[1] It is the oldest German school in East Asia still in existence today.

German School of Tokyo Yokohama
Deutsche Schule Tokyo Yokohama
東京横浜独逸学園
DSTY logo 2C.med.png
Sg-05-eingang.jpg
School entrance
Address
2-4-1 Chigasaki-Minami, Tsuzuki-ku
〒224-0037 横浜市都筑区茅ヶ崎南2-4-1

, ,
224-0037

Japan
Coordinates35.5384° N 139.5816° E Coordinates: 35°32′19″N 139°34′54″E / 35.538595°N 139.581582°E / 35.538595; 139.581582
Information
Other names
  • DSTY
TypePrivate, co-educational
MottoGerman: Bildung, die verbindet
(Education, that connects)
Established20 September 1904 (1904-09-20)
PrincipalDr. Wolfram Schrimpf
GradesKindergarten - 12th grade
LanguageGerman
Websitewww.dsty.ac.jp
Exterior view

OverviewEdit

The school includes a kindergarten, a primary school, a middle school (Orientierungsstufe) and a secondary school, which ends with the Abitur graduation exam with the option to enter the university. Other possible graduations are available excluding the possibility to go to university. These are the technical secondary school certificate (Fachoberschulabschluss), the secondary school certificate (Realschulabschluss) and the secondary modern school qualification (Hauptschulabschluss). Classes are held in German. For foreign languages English, Japanese, French, Latin and Spanish (as a school club) are available.

The closest subway station is Nakamachidai Station (10 minutes by foot).

HistoryEdit

The German School of Tokyo Yokohama was established in 1904 in Yokohama.[2] After the 1923 Great Kantō earthquake many German families moved from Yokohama to Tokyo. The school opened its new building in Ōmori, Ōta, Tokyo, in 1934. The building suffered little damage during World War II, but was requisitioned by the American military government as enemy property following Germany's capitulation in May 1945, so school activity came to a standstill. American authorities returned the school's impounded property in 1951 and school activity finally could restart on December 1, 1953, with 17 students in total. In 1960 the first graduation students received their certificates.[citation needed]

At the time the school campus was in Ota, Tokyo.[3] On November 27, 1967, the school's old building was replaced with a modern structure. After 1970 the student numbers rose quickly and the school outgrew its space. It was decided to build a new, more spacious school building in Tsuzuki-ku, Yokohama. The school's activities started there in September 1991 with 450 students. After a temporary slump in the number of schoolchildren, the enrollment numbers rose significantly, requiring the addition of a third floor to the 1991 building in 2010. The school survived the triple disaster of 2011 without any structural damage, but the number of students initially fell sharply due to the departure of many families. Today the effects of the crisis can no longer be seen, with over 550 students now attending the school.[citation needed]

See alsoEdit

German schools in Japan:

Japanese international schools in Germany:

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Access Archived 2015-01-02 at the Wayback Machine." German School of Tokyo Yokohama. Retrieved on January 18, 2015. "2-4-1 Chigasaki-Minami, Tsuzuki-ku, Yokohama 224-0037, Japan" - Address in Japanese: "〒224-0037 横浜市都筑区茅ヶ崎南2-4-1"
  2. ^ Kudo, Akira (1998). Japanese-German Business Relations:Co-operation and Rivalry in the Inter-war Period. London: Routledge. p. 31. ISBN 0-415-14971-1.
  3. ^ "Deutscher Bundestag 4. Wahlperiode Drucksache IV/3672" (Archive). Bundestag (West Germany). 23 June 1965. Retrieved on 12 March 2016. p. 35/51. "Deutsche Schule Tokyo 1847 2-chome, Sanno Ota-ku"

Further readingEdit

  • Deutscher Schulverein Tokyo-Yokohama (ed.):20. Jahresbericht 1974. September 1973-August 1974.Tokyo, 1974.
  • Heinz Riesenhuber, Josef Kreiner (ed.):Japan ist offen. Chancen für deutsche Unternehmen.Heidelberg,1998.
  • Stiftung Deutsche Schule Tokyo Yokohama (ed.):Festschrift Deutsche Schule Tokyo Yokohama.[1904-2005].Tokyo,2005.
  • (in Japanese) 井本 美穂. "Kindergarten Education in Deutsche Schule Tokyo Yokohama : With a Focus on the Cooperation between Kindergarten and Elementary School" (東京横浜独逸学園の幼稚園教育 : 幼小連携を中心に). 音楽文化教育学研究紀要 (25), 215-222, 2013. Hiroshima University教育学部音楽文化教育学講座. See profile at CiNii.

External linksEdit