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George Cabot Lodge

George Cabot "Bay" Lodge (October 10, 1873 – August 21, 1909)[1] was an American poet of the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

George Cabot Lodge
Born(1873-10-10)October 10, 1873
DiedAugust 21, 1909(1909-08-21) (aged 35)
EducationHarvard University
University of Paris
OccupationPoet
Spouse(s)
Mathilda Frelinghuysen Davis
(m. 1900; his death 1909)
ChildrenHenry Cabot Lodge, Jr.
John Davis Lodge
Helena Constance Lodge
Parent(s)Henry Cabot Lodge
Anna Cabot Mills Davis
RelativesSee Lodge family

Early lifeEdit

Lodge was born in Boston on October 10, 1873 and grew up at his parents home in Nahant, Massachusetts. A descendant of several Boston Brahmin families, he was the son of Anna Cabot Mills "Nannie" (née Davis) Lodge (1851–1915) and Henry Cabot Lodge (1850–1924), a Republican politician who eventually represented Massachusetts in the U.S. Senate.[2] His siblings were Constance Davis Lodge (wife of Augustus Peabody Gardner and, after his death, Clarence Charles Williams) and art curator John Ellerton Lodge.

His maternal grandparents were Rear admiral Charles Henry Davis and Harriette Blake (née Mills) Davis (a daughter of U.S. Senator Elijah Hunt Mills). His paternal grandparents were John Ellerton Lodge and Anna (née Cabot) Lodge, a granddaughter of U.S. Senator George Cabot, Bay's namesake and great-great-grandfather.[3]

Lodge began studies at Harvard College, and continued them in France, at the University of Paris, and Berlin into his mid-twenties. At Harvard, he was a member of the Harvard Polo Club.[4]

CareerEdit

In 1897, Lodge began work as a secretary to both his father and a U.S. Senate committee in Washington. He later served successfully in the Spanish–American War as a naval cadet. Lodge was a close friend of Theodore Roosevelt, who penned a fond introduction for the posthumous 1911 collection Poems and Dramas of George Cabot Lodge.[5] He was best known for his delicate sonnets, such as the Song of the Wave, Essex, and Trumbull Stickney (Stickney was a friend and admirer), several of which were anthologized. His style and artistic outlook were deeply affected by the pessimism of Schopenhauer and Giacomo Leopardi, as well as French influences including Baudelaire and Leconte de Lisle.

After his death, his collected poems and dramas, in two volumes, were published in 1911 by Houghton Mifflin Company.[6]

Personal lifeEdit

On August 19, 1900, he married Mathilda Elizabeth Frelinghuysen Davis (1876–1960)[7] at the Church of the Advent in Boston.[8] She was the daughter of Judge John J. Davis and Sarah Helen (née Frelinghuysen).[8] After her father's death in 1902, her mother remarried to Brig. Gen. Charles L. McCawley. Her maternal grandfather was Secretary of State Frederick Theodore Frelinghuysen and her great-grandfather was Massachusetts governor John Davis.[7] Together Mathilda and George were the parents of three children,[9] including two sons who both became prominent politicians:

Lodge died, aged 35, of heart failure while vacationing on Tuckernuck Island, near Nantucket, on August 21, 1909.[19] He was buried at Mount Auburn Cemetery in Cambridge, Massachusetts.[1] His widow died in 1960.[7]

DescendantsEdit

Through his eldest son Henry, he was posthumously the grandfather of two grandsons, George Cabot Lodge II (a professor at Harvard Business School,[20] who unsuccessfully ran against Ted Kennedy for the U.S. Senate)[21] and Henry S. Lodge.[10] Through his second son John, he was posthumously the grandfather of two granddaughters, Lily Lodge of Manhattan (co-founder of Actors Conservatory), and Beatrice Anna Cabot Lodge (wife of Antonio de Oyarzabal, who later became the Spanish Ambassador to the United States).[12][22]

Through his daughter Helena, Baroness de Streel, he was posthumously the grandfather of three, Jacqueline de Streel (who married a Belgian banker); Quentin de Streel (d. 1998),[23] and Elisabeth (née de Streel) de Wasseige.[24]

LegacyEdit

A biography, The Life of George Cabot Lodge (1911), was written by his friend and confidant Henry Adams.[25][26]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b "SENATOR LODGE'S SON DIES.; Heart Failure Due to Indigestion Proves Fatal to George Cabot Lodge" (PDF). The New York Times. 23 August 1909. Retrieved 18 May 2019.
  2. ^ "LODGE, Henry Cabot - Biographical Information". bioguide.congress.gov. Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved 18 May 2019.
  3. ^ Lodge, Henry Cabot (1878). Life and Letters of George Cabot. Little, Brown and Company. Retrieved January 11, 2012. pp. 8, 323, 568
  4. ^ The constitution and by-laws of the Harvard Polo Club with the list of officers and members, 1883-1905
  5. ^ "" A New England Swinburne" Describes the Poet Best; POEMS AND DRAMAS OF GEORGE CABOT Lodge, Houghton Mifflin & Co. $2.50. - The New York Times" (PDF). The New York Times. 24 March 1912. Retrieved 18 May 2019.
  6. ^ Lodge, George Cabot (1902). Poems (1899-1902). Cameron, Blake. Retrieved 18 May 2019.
  7. ^ a b c "Mrs. George Lodge, Mother of Envoys" (PDF). The New York Times. 2 July 1960. Retrieved 18 May 2019.
  8. ^ a b "Lodge -- Davis" (PDF). The New York Times. 20 August 1900. Retrieved 18 May 2019.
  9. ^ Dictionary of American Biography. Page 346. Scribner, 1959.
  10. ^ a b Pace, Eric (28 February 1985). "Henry Cabot Lodge, 82, Is Dead". The New York Times. Retrieved 18 May 2019.
  11. ^ "LODGE, Henry Cabot, Jr. - Biographical Information". bioguide.congress.gov. Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved 18 May 2019.
  12. ^ a b "John Davis Lodge, 82, Ex-Envoy and Connecticut Governor, Dies". The New York Times. 31 October 1985. Retrieved 18 May 2019.
  13. ^ The Political Graveyard accessed 2007-07-06
  14. ^ Press, The Associated (8 March 1998). "Francesca Lodge, 95, a Patron of the Arts". The New York Times. Retrieved 18 May 2019.
  15. ^ Gronnerud, Kathleen A.; Spitzer, Scott J. (2018). Modern American Political Dynasties: A Study of Power, Family, and Political Influence. ABC-CLIO. p. 28. ISBN 9781440854439. Retrieved 18 May 2019.
  16. ^ Times, Special to The New York (2 August 1929). "MISS HELENA LODGE TO WED DIPLOMAT; Granddaughter of Late U.S. Senator to Marry Edouard de Streel of Belgium". The New York Times. Retrieved 18 May 2019.
  17. ^ Times, Special to The New York (15 September 1929). "HELENA LODGE WED TO EDOUARD DE STREEL; Prince de Ligne, Belgian Envoy, Is Best Man at Marriage of Late Senator's Granddaughter". The New York Times. Retrieved 18 May 2019.
  18. ^ Adams, Henry; Levenson, Jacob C.; Samuels, Ernest (1982). The Letters of Henry Adams. Harvard University Press. p. 36. ISBN 9780674526860. Retrieved 18 May 2019.
  19. ^ The Harvard Graduates' Magazine, Volume XVIII, 1909-1910, page 337.
  20. ^ "George C. Lodge Jaime and Josefina Chua Tiampo Professor of Business Administration, Emeritus". www.hbs.edu. Harvard Business School. Retrieved 18 May 2019.
  21. ^ Kann, Peter R. (October 16, 1962). "George Cabot Lodge | Profile". Harvard Crimson. Retrieved 18 May 2019.
  22. ^ "Beatrice Lodge, '56 Debutante, To Wed in July; Daughter of Envoy to Spain Is Betrothed to Antonio de Oyarzabal" (PDF). The New York Times. 9 December 1960. Retrieved 18 May 2019.
  23. ^ "QUENTIN DE STREEL, 64, EX-EASTON LIBRARY DIRECTOR". The Morning Call. April 23, 1998. Retrieved 18 May 2019.
  24. ^ Hess, Stephen (2017). America's Political Dynasties. Routledge. p. 462. ISBN 9781351532150. Retrieved 18 May 2019.
  25. ^ Adams, Henry (1911). The Life of George Cabot Lodge. Houghton Mifflin. Retrieved 18 May 2019.
  26. ^ "BIOGRAPHY IN YANKEE STYLE; George Cabot Lodge Described After the Fashion of" (PDF). The New York Times. 25 February 1912. Retrieved 18 May 2019.

External linksEdit